Pontrieux: Village By Trieux River

Pontrieux, a town of historical interests, is situated along the banks of Trieux River in the Côtes-d’Armor in Bretagne, north-western France. Designated as a “Little City of Character” and “Town of Art”, the town shows off streets full of pretty flowers and attractive small harbor at the end of the estuary. “Petite Cité de Charactère” dates back in the medieval times – the 15th century and the habitants are called Pontriviens. Pontrieux develops through history as a prosperous and thriving inland town.

 

The distinctive feature of this town is many fine bourgeois houses which are built from the 15th century medieval wood and timber called communal lavoir. Pontrieux has 50 lavoirs along the banks of the river which owns beautifully planted up and attractive flower displays. Thanks to the indeed beauty, the town has been awarded the “Ville Fleurie” competition four times.

The restaurants and shops are situated in the center of charming Breton port town of Pontrieux. Needless to say, all rooms are non-smoking.

Pontrieux is the pretty Brittany village which is situated in the coast of northern Brittany.

In Pontrieux, tourists can find the Richel watermill (Moulin de Richel) and the grand “Hotel de Keruzec”.

Coming to Pontrieux, visitors also have chance to explore the Breton countryside as well as numerous beautiful and historic villages, towns, castles, dolmens and harbors.

The town is featured with charming timbered buildings.

Each house has a special sink area by the river which is used for family’s washing and daily routine.

Trieux River is regarded as the soul of the village with fine bourgeois houses.

The tourism is currently the main industry of Pontrieux.

If possible, the best time to visit Pontrieux is in the evening. Boat trip is an ideal way to wander around the charming town to see the lavoirs and bridges in colored light.

Pontrieux is famous for a Monday market, Friday night free entertainment and “live” painting competition in August.

The steam trains at seaport bring tourists from Paimpol to Pontrieux along the river.

People in Pontrieux always welcome tourists to the village hospitably.

 

Related links:

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My favourite is traveling, especially going abroad. I love to write about beautiful destinations,tourism events, local people, along with the customs.

Carpenter st - Queen's Village

Fabulous end row, rich in 200 yrs of history. Walk to the Italian market, washington st., and live the downtown lifestyle you’ve always dreamed of. Original …

More History Of Queen Village Articles

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Cool Philadelphia Traffic images

Some cool philadelphia traffic images:

NYC: Columbus Circle
philadelphia traffic

Image by wallyg
Columbus Circle, located at the intersection of Broadway, Central Park West, Central Park South (59th Street), and 8th Avenue, on the southwest corner of Central Park is the official point at which distances to and from New York City are measured. The traffic circle was designed by William P. Eno, a businessman who pioneered many early innovations in road safety and traffic control, as part of Frederick Law Olmsted’s vision for the park, which included a circle at its Eighth Avenue entrance. Construction was completed in 1905.

About ten thousand people, including Italian, Spanish, and American dignitaries, gathered in Columbus Circle on October 12, 1892, the 400th anniversary of the arrival of Columbus in the “New World.” Together they dedicated the Columbus Monument, designed by Sicilian sculptor Gaetano Russo and donated to the City of New York by the Italian-American community. Gen. L.P. di Cesnola, the Director of the Metropolitan Museum of Art, spoke at the event, telling the audience that Columbus’s “true monument is this great land, its institutions, its prosperity, its blessing, its lessons of advance for all humanity.”

The monument consists of a statue of Columbus posed on a column mounted on a base surrounded by fountains; an allegorical figure depicting the Genius of Discovery stands on the base. Both Columbus and the latter figure are carved of Carrara marble. Bronze elements include two bas-reliefs (1,2) portraying Columbus’s journey, as well as an American bald eagle and lotus-shaped cresting. In addition, bronze ships’ prows and anchors adorn the granite column. The total height of the plinth, pedestal, column and sculpture is 77 feet, enabling passerby to see the monument from miles away on a clear day.

Early in the 20th century, the monument was fortified with complex supports engineered for the new subway system to be tunneled beneath it. A lavish wrought-iron fence was installed encircling the monument. In 1965, the installation of fountains and illumination with funds from book publisher and philanthropist George T. Delacorte enhanced the site. The fountains, designed by Douglas Leigh, were inspired by water displays in Rome. In 1990 and 1991, the monument underwent an extensive renovation funded by the Columbus Citizens Foundation, under the auspices of the Adopt-A-Monument Program, a joint venture of Parks, the Municipal Art Society, and the New York City Art Commission. George Delacorte and Arthur Ross donated additional funds for the restoration of the decorative fence. The Central Park Conservancy, through an endowment established by Mr. Delacorte’s heirs, will continue to maintain the monument in the future.

Renovations to the circle completed in 2005 included the addition of water fountains, wooden benches, and plantings encircling the monument. The inner circle measures approximately 36,000 square feet, and the outer circle is approximately 148,000 square feet. The redesign, by Olin Partnership, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, was the recipient of the 2006 American Society of Landscape Architects’ General Design Award Of Honor.

Columbus Circle, located at the intersection of Broadway, Central Park West, Central Park South (59th Street), and 8th Avenue, on the southwest corner of Central Park is the official point at which distances to and from New York City are measured. The traffic circle was designed by William P. Eno, a businessman who pioneered many early innovations in road safety and traffic control, as part of Frederick Law Olmsted’s vision for the park, which included a circle at its Eighth Avenue entrance. Construction was completed in 1905.

About ten thousand people, including Italian, Spanish, and American dignitaries, gathered in Columbus Circle on October 12, 1892, the 400th anniversary of the arrival of Columbus in the “New World.” Together they dedicated the Columbus Monument, designed by Sicilian sculptor Gaetano Russo and donated to the City of New York by the Italian-American community. Gen. L.P. di Cesnola, the Director of the Metropolitan Museum of Art, spoke at the event, telling the audience that Columbus’s “true monument is this great land, its institutions, its prosperity, its blessing, its lessons of advance for all humanity.”

The monument consists of a statue of Columbus posed on a column mounted on a base surrounded by fountains; an allegorical figure depicting the Genius of Discovery stands on the base. Both Columbus and the latter figure are carved of Carrara marble. Bronze elements include two bas-reliefs (1,2) portraying Columbus’s journey, as well as an American bald eagle and lotus-shaped cresting. In addition, bronze ships’ prows and anchors adorn the granite column. The total height of the plinth, pedestal, column and sculpture is 77 feet, enabling passerby to see the monument from miles away on a clear day.

Early in the 20th century, the monument was fortified with complex supports engineered for the new subway system to be tunneled beneath it. A lavish wrought-iron fence was installed encircling the monument. In 1965, the installation of fountains and illumination with funds from book publisher and philanthropist George T. Delacorte enhanced the site. The fountains, designed by Douglas Leigh, were inspired by water displays in Rome. In 1990 and 1991, the monument underwent an extensive renovation funded by the Columbus Citizens Foundation, under the auspices of the Adopt-A-Monument Program, a joint venture of Parks, the Municipal Art Society, and the New York City Art Commission. George Delacorte and Arthur Ross donated additional funds for the restoration of the decorative fence. The Central Park Conservancy, through an endowment established by Mr. Delacorte’s heirs, will continue to maintain the monument in the future.

Renovations to the circle completed in 2005 included the addition of water fountains, wooden benches, and plantings encircling the monument. The inner circle measures approximately 36,000 square feet, and the outer circle is approximately 148,000 square feet. The redesign, by Olin Partnership, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, was the recipient of the 2006 American Society of Landscape Architects’ General Design Award Of Honor.

In 2007, the Time Warner Center was ranked #105 on the AIA 150 America’s Favorite Architecture list. For more information on the Time Warner Center, see this picture.

En route to Cafe Spice
philadelphia traffic

Image by lsc21
I shot this about an hour after taking After Hours on 11th Street. My wife picked me up from the office, and we were driving over to Cafe Spice (Second Street between Market and Chestnut). This is my attempt at abstraction by shooting wide open and out of focus.


philadelphia traffic

Image by John Donges

gI_65769_wyplay_play_the_diff-011

Play the Difference with Wyplay at IBC 2014


Marseille, France (PRWEB) September 10, 2014

At the eve of the IBC 2014 show, Wyplay, creator of software solutions for leading pay-TV operators, reflects on one year of progress since the announcement of its Frog initiative and highlights the key themes it will showcase on the exhibition’s floor at the RAI Amsterdam (Hall 5.A11).

“From the viewers’ point of view, we are witnessing major changes in the TV industry landscape with the rise of new ways of consuming media and entertainment on new connected devices through increasingly diverse and competing service offerings. Unfortunately, a lot of operators are locked-in with proprietary solutions to address these growing challenges.” says Wyplay CEO Jacques Bourgninaud. He adds: “In this context, the leaders of tomorrow will have opted for boldness and freedom. This is what Wyplay brings to the table with our remarkable track record with operators. Thanks to Frog, our open source initiative opened to all actors of the industry, Wyplay is now on a growth trajectory to become the market standard for convergent TV middleware solutions.”

Highlights of Wyplay’s showcase at IBC 2014 include:

Remarkable Track Record – new Tier 1 customers in Europe and Latin America

Wyplay today announces that it has gained three more operator customers, including a major European broadcaster, a Nordic IPTV operator and a wholesale IPTV service provider in Brazil.

All these projects are opportunities for our Frog System Integrators to provide significant professional services activities to customise the Frog middleware for Set-Top Boxes and its backend counterpart for multiscreen personal TV user experiences.

Details on these new customers will be made public in the future.

Wyplay’s software solutions have previously been chosen by operators like Canal+, Belgacom and SFR, for committed deployments totalling more than 9 million devices.

Frog – 60 Licensees in 8 months

Announced one year ago at the IBC 2013, the Frog by Wyplay initiative is built around Wyplay’s software solutions made available to Frog Licensees under a open source model and aims to free all actors in the TV ecosystem from being locked into proprietary solutions.

In just eight months after its launch early 2014, Frog is now bringing together a growing community of companies across the entire digital TV technology value chain: chipset vendors, device manufacturers, independent software vendors, software services providers and operators.

The full source code and technical documentation of the Frog middleware are available to licensees on the Frog Community Portal at http://portal.frogbywyplay.com

In addition, Frog Licensees benefit from support and training services, turnkey reference implementations for select chipset platforms, as well as a range of pre-integrated solutions from our Marketplace Partners.

With 60 Licensees and counting, Frog is becoming a market standard for convergent TV middleware.

Frog – the market standard for convergent middleware

In July this year, Wyplay released “Bull Frog” v2.0, the second increment of its open source middleware for Set-Top Boxes. That release included fully-integrated support of satellite, cable and terrestrial broadcast services using the DVB standard, with full handling of DVB System Information metadata. Reference implementations of “Bull Frog” are available for STMicroelectronics and Broadcom System on Chips, with a reference implementation for Sigma Designs silicon announced at the occasion of IBC 2014.

Today, Wyplay announces the availability to all Frog Licensees in Q1 2015 of its backend solutions for multiscreen personal TV user experiences. This toolbox of middleware components and big data technologies is currently being developed as part of ongoing customer engagements and will be shared once it has gone into production, ensuring Frog Licensees and Scaling Partners can confidently adopt it to deploy convergent TV services with accelerated speed to market.

Showcase by 20 Frog Licensees and Early Adopters at IBC 2014

At the IBC 2014 exhibition opening Sept 12th at the RAI Amsterdam, Wyplay’s Frog solutions will be showcased by the following exhibitors:

Wyplay – 5.A11

Frog Licensees

o    4Mod Technology – 14.F11

o    Airties – 5.B33

o    Coship – 1.F50

o    Hwacom – 4.C50

o    Jiuzhou – 3.C56

o    KaonMedia – 1B16

o    Mathembedded – 14.A12

o    Opentech – 5.C34

o    Quadrille – 2.B39b

o    Sagemcom – 1.D41

o    Sigma Designs – 2.C37 / BM7

o    STMicroelectronics – 1.F40

o    Wildmoka – 2.B39i

o    WizTiVi – 14.L01

Frog early adopters

o    Broadcom – 2.C25

o    Envivio – 1.D73

o    Philips – 1.A81

o    Rovi – 5.A30

o    ViXS – 3.A12

# # #

About Wyplay

Independent and internationally recognized, Wyplay develops open, modular and innovative software solutions for IPTV, cable, satellite and terrestrial TV operators and broadcasters around the world.

Wyplay’s technology enables operators to select, configure, and deploy solutions easily from the richest list of preconfigured functionality available in a modular online TV solution, including an electronic program guide; video recorder; multiscreen and multiroom connectivity, an application store; and more.

Wyplay’s professional services team creates user experiences that exactly match and complement an operator’s or broadcaster’s product and market strategies. Wyplay is now a strategic partner for such leading brands as as SFR, Vodafone, Belgacom and now Canal+.

To learn more about Wyplay and its Frog by Wyplay offer, visit http://www.wyplay.com.







More Independence Hall Press Releases

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The Role of Physics in Society

If we could get into one of those wonderful Wellsian time machines, all shining oak and glass, with polished brass handles and instruments, and ride it back to some time in the latter half of the nineteenth century, we would encounter a very different world from the one of today. Especially for Americans, it is difficult to conceive of a world where the United States counted for relatively little on the world stage. The same applied even more to all the other countries of the Americas. Except for Canada and Cuba, the whole continent had won political independence from Europe during that century, but it was still perceived as an extension of European cultures, with limited input in world affairs.

The whole world was run, in effect, from a handful of Western European countries, led by Britain which, even without the United States, had an empire that covered about one quarter of the globe. Furthermore, it was by far the leading manufacturer of machinery, armaments and textiles in the world, with the Bank of England holding most of the gold used in world trade. France also had a very large empire and so did some very small European countries, like Holland, Belgium and Portugal. Germany and Italy were occupied for many years during this period with unifying their countries under one central authority and therefore missed out on most of the empire building activity, but Germany especially was rapidly catching up with Britain as a leading manufacturing nation by the end of that century.

Looking at the size of all these European countires on the map, one can only wonder how it came about that they were running most of the world at that time. What made their influence so overwhelming when, only a few centuries before, they had seemed on the verge of extinction from the black death? The answer to this question leads into the subject of this article.

What made the small Western European nations invincible at that time were the practical applications of natural laws, contained in Newton’s monumental synthesis, the Principia Mathematica, published in 1687. Only four years before that date, Western Europe had been very nearly overrun by the Ottoman Turks and was only saved by the opportune arrival of the king of Poland, Jan Sobieski, who rode his cavalry to the aid of the beleagured Duke of Lorraine and his Christian coalition, fighting a desperate battle bfore the gates of Vienna. And a scant two hundred years later, the flood of inventions derived from applying the basic laws of physics enabled these same endangered little countries to rule the world.

Was that all there was to the story? If we had made our time machine land somewhere in England during this period, the latter half of the nineteenth century, we would have encountered some appalling and, to us today, totally unacceptable social conditions. But there would have been something else. English society at that time exuded an underlying confidence and certainty that we can only envy today. They were looking to science to solve all their problems by simply continuing along the same path they had been following for over a hundred years. And by science they meant the scientific way of looking at things, which meant not only building better steam engines, roads, railroads and ships, but also better social systems and laws, founded not on hereditary privilege but on usefulness to the community. They knew they still had plenty of work left but they felt they were on the right path and the coming twentieth century would bring very great benefits and solutions to problems.

Where did this “scientific way of looking at things” come from and why did it suddenly provide such an impetus to a few Western European nations? The answer lies not with Newton but beyond him, to Galileo. Galileo founded modern physics by providing the axiomatic postulates that defined this “scientific way” for the future. He first of all secularized science by removing God from the picture and installing nature and her laws in His place. Nature was all that was needed to explain the physical world in mathematical (scientific) terms. Then he concentrated the focus of his new physics on just matter and motion. What causes a change in motion is a physical force and these are the realities dealt with by Newton.

Galileo was a revolutionary innovator when it came to viewing the world. He looked at it analytically, without feeling any personal connection with the objects he was analyzing. This change from the medieval, participatory, experience of the world enabled Galileo and later thinkers like Newton to express natural phenomena and natural laws in mathematical, logical terms. The previously impenetrable laws of nature were explained in simple, rational ways that ordinary people could understand. They could see that, if you confined God and the upper world to a realm of belief only, the only reality you had to deal with in nature consisted of the physical objects that, in Lord Kelvin’s phrase, were “quantifiable” and “measurable”.

By the end of the nineteenth century, the whole of nature was becoming a well-lighted room, with every new advance in science adding to the brightness of the illumination. It was fully expected that physics would finish its theoretical work very soon. As the same Lord Kelin said in the 1880s: “There is nothing new to be discovered in physics now; all that remains is more and more precise measurement”.

Here, then, is the origin of that confidence and certainty which was such a feature of Victorian society, which could be seen in any portrait of the plump and prosperous persons of the new moneyed classes of the time. There was complete harmony between the way people experienced the world as the only solid reality and the way science explained this world in laws that were predictable and logical, with causes leading to their calculable effects as certainly as billiard balls colliding on a table.

Then came the twentieth century and physics breached the atomic barrier. The solid reality of physical objects (which Newton dealt with) disintegrated in the subatomic world of particles. It became obvious that these particles were not just very small bits of the same matter that people were familiar with. As time went on and quantum mechanics kept gaining ground, the very reality of the existence of such particles as separate entities became doubful. One of the greatest physicists of the twentieth century, Werner Heisenberg, put it this way:

“In the experiments about atomic events we have to do with things and facts, the phenomena that are just as real as any phenomena in daily life. But the atoms or elementary particles themselves are not real; they form a world of potentialities or possibilities rather than of things or facts”.

But any object in nature that Newton dealt with is simply composed of a very large number of these “atoms or elementary particles”. If these are not real and the objects themselves are real, where does reality begin? Is reality merely a function of the number of atoms you can put together? We can begin to see why we no longer enjoy that feeling of certainty and confidence in having the right answers which our Victorian ancestors laid claim to.

We still, or at least most of us do, feel the world as Galileo did. We still feel that the physical objects of nature are the only solid reality, and this includes gases, which may not be visible but which we know consist of just those same “atoms and elementary particles” whose reality can, apparently, no longer be taken for granted. Our science today no longer reflects the way we feel about the world. The old harmony is gone. However, most of us still have faith in science’s ability to explain the world to us. In Newton’s time, science was readily understood by educated people. His laws could be taught to schoolchildren. Even if he could not really explain what gravity actually was, Newton proved mathematically that its operation could be explained successfully by saying that it worked in direct proportion to the masses of the bodies involved and in inverse proportion to the square of the distance between them. Today, the mathematics of physics has become so difficult that only a small group of specialists can understand it. Ordinary people, even if they are reasonably well acquainted with science, can no longer contribute to the debate in terms of the mathematical work involved.

However, physics has now reached the point where in both theory and practice in, for instance quantum mechanics, the consequences and implications of the work done are philosophical as well as mathematical. This may have the effect of bringing this very remote and difficult science once more into an area of more public debate. The mathematics would, of course, remain off-limits to ordinary mortals, but the conceptual structure that Galileo bequeathed to later thinkers, especially with regard to reality, might need revision and others besides theoretical physicists might usefully be brought into the picture. Galileo, like most educated people of his time, was well versed in the Platonic concepts of reality. To Plato, the knowledge to be gained from the physical world was fleeting and unreliable, being merely the subjective result of our sense perceptions. Real, true knowledge, which did not depend on human senses and was therefore objective, was to him a property only of the upper, divine world. However, when Galileo came to stating his axiomatic postulates regarding future scientific methods, he felt that matter and motion – and only matter and motion – were suitable for science because they did not depend on any human presence or any human senses. He felt that these two “qualities” were independently (and therefore objectively) real. His thinking in this regard affected the course of the entire future of physics, though in time, not just matter and motion but all physical phenomena came to be regarded as independently (and therefore objectively) real, as we have seen.

However, physics, in its own, normal development in the last hundred years, has come to realize that all physical phenomena, perceived through the senses, must be subjective in nature. Even matter and motion involve the sense of sight and Galileo erred in thinking that these two qualities of the physical world could somehow be considered objective, or independent of man’s senses. But if everything we perceive in nature has, by definition, to be subjective, then no physical phenomena can have an independent identity or history of their own, which would cause very serious rethinking about the early periods of this earth, before the appearance of man. For these reasons, it seems reasonable to suppose that our concepts of reality in modern physics are the ones that most need new thinking, so that a revised framework of concepts might be worked out, within which the physics of the future can operate.

Werner Thurau was born in December 1927, in Havana, Cuba. In 1929, his family returned to his father’s native Germany. He spent the entire 1930s in Berlin, but came to England in 1939 and was then further educated in that country, ending with an engineering degree from London University. His further career took him all over the world on technical projects, moving first to Mexico and then to the United States, where he lives now. At school in England, he was exposed early in life to the world of ideas. Some of his teachers were friends of C.S. Lewis and Lewis’s Oxford group, the Inklings, and his father was a philosophical bookworm. Werner combined this background with a lifelong interest in physics, especially modern physics after it breached the atomic barrier. This interest extended to Galileo, the founder of our age, and what made him so different from others of his time, as well as to the effect physics has had on other related sciences, such as evolutionary theory (and its polar opposite, creationism). He came to see that the latest developments in physics bring in subjects not normally associated with a book on that science, such as consciousness, reality concepts and even ethics. It is the reality concepts of Galileo that have most haunted physics ever since and need revision.
For further thoughts on such a revision, visit: http://www.galileoshadow.com

14765287781_356b9543491

Nice Philadelphia Travel Guide photos

Some cool philadelphia travel guide images:

Image from page 144 of “The prospector’s field-book and guide in the search for and the easy determination of ores and other useful minerals” (1903)
philadelphia travel guide

Image by Internet Archive Book Images
Identifier: prospectorsfield00osbo
Title: The prospector’s field-book and guide in the search for and the easy determination of ores and other useful minerals
Year: 1903 (1900s)
Authors: Osborn, H. S. (Henry Stafford), 1823-1894
Subjects: Prospecting Mineralogy, Determinative
Publisher: Philadelphia, H.C. Baird & co.

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For this purpose the mass of gold dustand iron sand is allowed to become perfectly dry,and small quantities of it at a time are placed in aninstrument called a blower—a sort of a shallowscoop, made of tin and open at one end. Holdingthe blower with its mouth pointed away from him,and gently shaking it so as constantly to change theposition of the particles, the operator blows gentlyalong the surface of the contents, regulating theforce and direction of his breath so as to remove thesand without disturbing the gold. Where water GOLD. Ill can be had, a pan is the most efficient instrument aman can travel with in his gold-seeking journeys. A crude apparatus formerly much used in Cali-fornia and Australia is called the cradle or rocker.This, as shown on Fig. 41, is a trough of some 7feet in length and 2 broad. Across the bottomof this several bars are nailed at equal distances,and at the upper end a kind of sieve is fixed at abouta foot above the bottom. This whole arrangement Fig. 41.

Text Appearing After Image:
is mounted upon rollers. To operate the apparatusfour men are required. One man digs out theearth from the hole, a second supplies the cradlesieve with this auriferous earth, a third keeps up asupply of water which he pours upon the earth inthe sieve, while a fourth keeps the machine contin-ually moving upon the rollers. The large stoneswashed out are removed by hand from the sieve, 112 PROSPECTOR S FIELD-BOOK AND GUIDE. and the water at the same time washes the smallersubstance through, which is slowly carried towardsthe lower end of the trough by a slight inclinationgiven to the whole. Thus the flow of water tendsto keep the earthy particles in suspension so as toallow of their washing off, while the heavier por-tions of gold are obstructed in their flow, and re-tained against the cross bars fixed to the cradlebottom. These are removed from time to time anddried in the sun, when, after blowing away lighterparticles, the metal only further requires to bemelted. A more efficient appar

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Image from page 12 of “Smith’s hand-book and guide in Philadelphia : containing a general view of the city, its government, public buildings, educational, literary, ecclesiastical, scientific, and benevolent institutions, places of public amusements, rail
philadelphia travel guide

Image by Internet Archive Book Images
Identifier: smithshandbookgu00phil
Title: Smith’s hand-book and guide in Philadelphia : containing a general view of the city, its government, public buildings, educational, literary, ecclesiastical, scientific, and benevolent institutions, places of public amusements, railroads, and routes from, and in the city, hotels, public parks, and cemeteries, and a new map
Year: 1871 (1870s)
Authors:
Subjects:
Publisher: Philadelphia : G. Delp

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so c LCeOi rd J-U. HALF-A-MIIXXON ^ OF WHEELER &. WILSON LOCKSTITCH winq i jsro-w IlsT USE. Any one desiring to purchase one of these inimitable Machines can heaccommodated by making application to ONE OF OUR TRAVELING SALESMEN;

Text Appearing After Image:
Or, by addressing us or calling at our Salesroom,914 Chestnut Street, Philadelphia. PETERSON & CARPENTER, GENERAL AGENTS. CHAS. F. HASELTINFS Galleries of ike Arts, 4 No. 1125 Chestnut Street, PHILADELPHIA. Finest Specimens of Foreign and American Artalways on Free Exhibition. ON HAND AND FOR SALE,The Largest and most Complete Assortment oi OIL IFJ^IlTTIICsra-S,Water Color Drawings, ENGRAVINGS, CHROMOS, LOOKING CLASSES, French Photographs and Artists Materials. Everything pertaining to Art matters kept or attended to. CHAS. F. HASELTINE, 1125 Chestnut Street. in mmmi&mtju /I uso AYERILL BAPLOW, Manufacturer, Wholesale and Retail Dealer in Cabinet Furniture. PAOTOBY,1126 and 1128 Charlotte Street. WABBBOOMS, 45 South Second Street, PHILADELPHIA. ..*»•»»»*• N**».w – HE MAKES HIS OWN FURNITUEE From, Thoroughly Seasoned Lumber, Sells it twenty per cent, less than any other house in Philadelphia of the same quality of goods, and warrants it five years. CALL AND EXAMINE HIS

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Image from page 110 of “The prospector’s field-book and guide in the search for and the easy determination of ores and other useful minerals” (1903)
philadelphia travel guide

Image by Internet Archive Book Images
Identifier: prospectorsfield00osbo
Title: The prospector’s field-book and guide in the search for and the easy determination of ores and other useful minerals
Year: 1903 (1900s)
Authors: Osborn, H. S. (Henry Stafford), 1823-1894
Subjects: Prospecting Mineralogy, Determinative
Publisher: Philadelphia, H.C. Baird & co.

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About This Book: Catalog Entry
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angles at A and E are equal, and the triangles areproportional, and the proportion is— C D : D E : : C B : A B. Then, if C D = 40 ft., D E = 45 ft., and C B = 60,we know that 45 x 60 = 2700 divided by (C D) 40ft. = 67J ft.; this is for A B, or the distance acrossthe river. The only difficulty is in measuring your anglesas true right angles, and this may be done bymeasuring the perpendicular, thus— Extend the line A B, Fig. 32, to F, Fig. 33, andlikewise the line D E, Fig. 32, to C, as in Fig. 33.Now measure equal distances on the line B D, forthe lines or offsets, B C and B H; also from D C, SURVEYING. 77 the offsets D I and D K; drive sticks in at G, H, I,and K. See that the distances represented by thedotted lines are equal, and if so, the lines A B Fand D C are perpendicular to the line G K, and Fig. 33.

Text Appearing After Image:
H your work will be well done and very nearly ac-curate. It is, however, well for the prospector to use aprism compass which will read to one-quarter de-gree. Such a compass may be had at very lowrate, not more than three inches diameter, of lightweight and of sufficient accuracy. The author hasused one for many years, and traveled with it manythousands of miles in Asia and Africa, and cantestify to the fact that by customary use it may behandled to a great degree of accuracy for horizontalangles. The needle is attached to the under sideof a cord with steel engraved degrees and fractions,and read by a magnifying prism. In almost every conceivable surveying project,especially in running adits and sinking shafts to 78 pkospectors field-book and guide. strike adits and galleries, only the best instrumentsshould be used. Everything depends upon themost accurate measurements, and this departmentof engineering is not one that can be treated ap-proximately, because any error in measure

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Thomas Addison (1793-1860) English Physician

ADDISON’S DISEASE (Addison’s Anaemia, Addison-Schilder Disease)

Addison’s disease is a rare endocrine or hormonal disorder resulting from primary adrenal insufficiency. The disease is characterized by weight loss, muscle weakness, fatigue, hypotension and increased skin pigmentation. It may occur after severe infection, massive adrenal bleeding, amyloidosis or surgical removal of the adrenal glands. Mostly the cause is unknown.

Thomas Addison was born in Long Beaton, near Newcastle in 1793, the same year that Marie Antoinette was found guilty of treason and was beheaded on the guillotine. He chose a remarkably similar career path to Hodgkins (Hodgkin’s Disease) and Bright (Bright’s Disease), graduating from Edinburgh University (1815), and then moving back to London to pursue a medical career at Guy’s Hospital for the Incurables (1820). This hospital was founded in 1726, mainly as an overflow hospital for the neighbouring St Thomas’s, which was working beyond its capacity. It maintained an emphasis on materia medica and medical treatment rather than on surgery, which remained the St Thomas’s speciality. Addison was appointed assistant physician to the hospital in 1824, and lecturer in charge of materia medica three years later. It was 1827, the same year that Ludwig Beethoven died in Vienna following complications of pneumonia and dropsy.

Of passing interest is the fact that Addison like Beethoven, suffered from severe depression, developed deafness and was a brilliant teacher. But the similarity ends there. In 1802, Beethoven wrote the famous “Heiligenstädter Testament” to his two brothers, in which he confessed his misery and his wish to commit suicide. He of course recovered, but Addison’s depression deteriorated and it is less known that he eventually committed suicide by jumping out of an upstairs window and fracturing his skull. Addison remained shy and introspective and consequently built up a poor practice. He pioneered worked on the adrenal glands and in 1849, noted that tuberculosis was found at autopsy in 70 to 90 percent of cases of adrenal insufficiency. In 1855, he published a controversial paper on ‘the constitutional and local effects of the suprarenal capsule’, to which many Scottish physicians, particularly Bennett disagreed with the findings.

It was largely because of Trousseau (Trousseau’s Sign) that the paper was eventually validated and this physician is remembered for calling the disease of adrenal insufficiency after Thomas Addison. He is also accredited for giving medical eponyms to both Graves and Hodgkin’s disease. Addison worked with many famous physicians during his period in Guy’s, including William Gull (Gull’s disease), with whom he first described the condition xanthoma diabeticorum. We remember Gull for describing the condition of hypothyroidism and for unsuccessfully treating Prince Albert after he contracted typhoid in 1861.Queen Victoria never recovered from her grief after his death and withdrew from social activities and dressed in black for many years thereafter. He also worked with Bright (Bright’s disease), with whom he tried to publish a medical text and is remembered for having contributed to most of the work on the volume.

He was the first doctor to describe circumscribed scleroderma, which is still known as Addison’s keloid in some parts of the world. He was also the first doctor to show that pneumonia occurred in the alveolar tissue and not in the interstitial cells. He described the progressive dysfunction of the adrenal gland associated with changes in brain tissue. This condition was later researched by the Austrian neurologist Schilder who noted loss of the myelin sheath surrounding nerve cells in the brain and the condition became known as Adrenoleukodystrophy or Addison -Schilder Disease.

Addison jumped to his death in 1860, the same year that Senator William Gwin of California and William H. Russell, of Missouri businessman bought 400 fast horses, hired 80 riders, and established the Pony Express Service.

Who am I?

South African Physician who graduated from Edinburgh and served with the RAMC in Africa during the First World War. In 1937 he became Professor of Medicine in Cairo on the advice of Sir Alexander Fleming. He died in London in 1959 and is remembered for giving his name to an autosomal nephritis associated with nerve deafness.

A.C. Alport

Dr. Treacy is on the Specialist Register in Ireland and holds a H.Dip in Dermatology and a BTEC in Laser technology and skin resurfacing. He is Irish Regional Representative of the British Association of Cosmetic Doctors and practices cosmetic medicine in his clinics in Dublin, Cork, London and the Middle East. He was amongst the first doctors worldwide to use the permanent facial endoprosthesis BioAlcamid for HIV Lipodystrophy patients. He was also the first person to introduce many techniques such as Radiofrequency assisted lasers, Fibroblast transplant and Contour Threads to Irish patients.

WPVI-TV, 6ABC Philadelphia Presents “Fever – 1793″ —- With a population of approximately 55000 in 1793, Philadelphia was America’s largest city, its capit…
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Risky Cosmetic Surgery Vacations on the Rise

(PRWEB) August 11, 2004

Interest in cosmetic surgery in the U.S. is just about over the moon.

Not only do we spend our spare time watching television reality and drama shows about facial and body rejuvenations, but millions of us pony up and present our not-so-perfect countenances to cosmetic surgeons in record numbers. We may even be in the middle of a cosmetic surgery bubble.

But vacation facelifts? Overseas cosmetic surgery has become a trend, and like every other fad, there are pros and cons. Sure, offshore procedures are cheaper. But danger and complications may lurk.

Ads for cosmetic surgery in exotic places around the globe are popping up just about everywhere. Some suggest you to have your surgery in the U.S. and then recover in the dream vacation of a lifetime.

However, many other ads ask you to travel to distant locales to undergo a facial rejuvenation. For instance, Xinhua, China, is currently popular with its 100 cosmetic surgery centers while Malaysia targets breast surgery tourists. Airlines are also getting in on the trend. For instance, Valuair, Singapore’s first budget airline, is launching a series of regional tours that combine short holidays with stops for cosmetic surgery. The airline’s Meditour to Bangkok runs $ 2200 from California. Internet surfers are bringing up Beautiful Vacations, a website written in English, French, Dutch, German and Arabic. The site arranges cosmetic, plastic and reconstructive tours to Indonesia. Costa Rica advertises itself as “the Beverly Hills of the South” because it has so many cosmetic surgeons.

Of course, a cosmetic surgery vacation is not without risk. For instance, so many women in the Eastern U.S. have been traveling to the Dominican Republic for fat removal procedures; the process has picked up its own moniker: Lipotourism.

“Something that cheap can be very costly — it can cost your life,” says New York City Councilman Miguel Martinez who is concerned because many New York City residents have been returning home after surgery and then complaining of boils, swelling and red splotches on their skin. Botches surgery returnees have also been reported in Massachusetts, North Carolina, Rhode Island and Puerto Rico.

In England, the British Association of Aesthetic Plastic Surgeons is seeing increasing numbers of patients seeking facelifts traveling to East Europe or Africa for low-cost surgery. One English plastic surgeon said he saw two patients who went to Eastern Europe for abdominoplasty (“tummy tuck”) whose wounds reopened following the surgery.

Before you sign on to any vacation destination, advises the American Society of Aesthetic Plastic Surgery, (ASAPS) you should think about your medical condition. Do you really want to sign up for water skiing, gymnastics or the fifty foot diving platform with fresh stitches?

“Suffice it to say, you won’t be ready for horseback riding or a round of golf,” advises the ASAPS. “Most cosmetic surgeries involve restrictions on normal activities, and particularly, on exercise.”

You can pretty well forget about catching some rays, too. It’s because many types of cosmetic surgery require you to stay out of the sun until you are fully healed. Moreover, some antibiotics react badly with sunlight.

Adds one London surgeon: “It’s not a good idea to have surgery and then go on a long-haul flight. The risk of deep vein thrombosis increases with a long flight.”

Further advises the ASAPS: “There are, of course, excellent surgeons in many countries, but it’s hard to evaluate training and credentials of surgeons outside the U.S. Unfortunately, there is no single international standard for quality in medicine.”

That also means an offshore facility may not offer the same safeguards for equipment, personnel and emergency procedures.

If your procedure runs into trouble when you get back home, a U.S.-based physician may not know what to do or how he can help because he usually will not know what specific techniques were used in the first operation.

http://www.cosmeticsurgery.com

EDITOR’S NOTE: If you need an expert source in your circulation area, call CosmeticSurgery.com’s media contact at 909-933-6750 ext 165 and we will survey our hundreds of physician associates in the U.S. for a spokesperson. We may also be able to locate actual tourists in your circulation area who have traveled on a cosmetic surgery vacation.

SOURCES:

The American Society of Plastic Surgeons -847-228-9900

The American Society of Aesthetic Plastic Surgery: 212-921-0500

Centers for Disease Control: 404-639-3286. Dominican Republic Infection report at New York City Department of Health: 212-788-5290







More Society Hill Flights Press Releases

NCCo sponsor heroin forum at William Penn HS

NCCo sponsor heroin forum at William Penn HS
The 6:30 p.m. program will be at William Penn High School, 713 E. Basin Road near New Castle, Sgt. Jacob Andrews said. Suitable for ages 12 and older, the program will be facilitated by Heroin Alert coordinator Marie Allen, who became an educator on …
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Kelly Anne Dolan Fund to host party at William Penn Inn
Kelly Anne Dolan Fund to host party at William Penn Inn. Angela Perez and Colleen Matijasick chat with Peggy Dolan, executive director of the Kelly Ann Dolan Memorial Fund, during the organization's 36th anniversary awards dinner Oct. 3. Photo by Phil …
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Route 15

A few nice philadelphia transportation images I found:

Route 15
philadelphia transportation

Image by rogerdupuis2
Eastbound car turning from Lancaster back onto Girard. Feb. 19, 2008.

SEPTA PCC 2743 at Altoff Siding
philadelphia transportation

Image by rogerdupuis2
SEPTA PCC 2743 is seen at the Rockhill Trolley Museum’s Altoff Siding during a photo op as part of the PCC Car Day event, July 21, 2012.

Last run from Blacklog
philadelphia transportation

Image by rogerdupuis2
It’s time to depart Blacklog Narrows for the last inbound runs of the day at the Rockhill Trolley Museum on July 21, 2012, PCC Car Day at the museum. York Railways 163, in the pocket track at right, is readied for its return whilst passengers wishing to ride back on Newark PCC 6 amble toward the 1946 streamliner, which already has its poles set for the inbound trip.

Stars of Critics Choice Awards Show Grace & Compassion – Celebrities Donate Gift Bags to Raise Funds for Tsunami Relief

Beverly Hills, CA; Cedar Knolls, NJ (PRWEB) January 12, 2005

The usual glitz and glamour of the 10th Annual Critics Choice Awards was outshined this year when Tinsel-Town’s brightest showed hearts of gold. As celebrities at the Wiltern Theatre in Los Angeles, CA recognized their peers and celebrated their cinematic achievement, the producers of the Critics Choice Awards show asked award winners and presenters to do the uncommon – to autograph, and then donate, their Celebrity Gift Bags – each valued well over $ 20,000 – to Operation USA for Tsunami relief in southeast Asia.    

The autographed Critics Choice Awards Gift Bags, sponsored by TRIMSPA and WINFUEL, will be auctioned on eBay with all proceeds going to Operation USA. Founded by Julie Andrews and Blake Edwards, Operation USA has garnered a reputation for innovation, care, and speed in sending relief flights, and sea and land shipments to countries that have experienced devastating events.

Alex Goen, founder and CEO of TRIMSPA, said, “These Gift Bags are highly valued. To give them up is one thing, but to autograph the bag in an effort to increase its value and the potential price fetched at auction, is remarkable. I am so pleased that we were a part of this event and could play a small role in the effort.” Goen was so moved by the celebrity generosity that, in appreciation, he had his company immediately issue each donator a personalized VIP Pit Pass to any NASCAR® Busch® Series race.

Among those who have contributed to the Tsunami relief fund are the Broadcast Critics’ Association and WINFUEL ®. Behind the scenes, honorees and guests visited the Winner’s Circle in the Gift Bag Showroom and autographed the hood of the #32 WINFUEL® / TRIMSPA Chevrolet. Signatures collected included: Eric McCormack, Tom Cruise, Maria Bello, Gerald Butler, David Duchovny, Tara Reid, George Lopez, Andy Garcia, Lauren Graham, Marcia Gay Harden, Regina King, Christina Lahti, William H. Macy, Virginia Madsen, Jamie Foxx, Chad Michael Murray, Tim Robbins, David Spade, Jon Voight, Treat Williams, and Emmy Rossum.    

The Broadcast Film Critics’ Association (BFCA) paid tribute to some of Hollywood’s finest talent, with awards presented to: “Sideways” for Best Picture, Jamie Fox for Best Actor, Hilary Swank for Best Actress, Thomas Haden Church for Best Supporting Actor, Virginia Madsen for Best Supporting Actress, and Tom Cruise recipient of the Distinguished Career Achievement in Performing Arts Award. For more information on the winners, go to http://www.thewb.com.

For exclusive backstage photos go to http://www.trimspapr.com/.

About WINFUEL Inc.

WINFUEL Inc., a Cedar Knolls, New Jersey company, is the maker of WINFUEL, an about-to-be released consumer product dedicated to those whose lives are committed to one thing – WINNING. WINFUEL® is a key sponsor in the NASCAR® racing circuit through Braun Racing.

About TRIMSPA Inc.

TRIMSPA® Inc., a Cedar Knolls, New Jersey company is the maker of TRIMSPA® X32, the leader in weight-loss supplements. TRIMSPA Inc. is a key sponsor in the NASCAR® racing circuit through Braun Racing, supporting various events and works with numerous charitable organizations including the Millennium Women’s Foundation, Susan G. Komen Breast Cancer Foundation®, American Cancer Society®, and Make-A-Wish Foundation®. TRIMSPA® Inc. has helped celebrities like Anna Nicole Smith and heavyweight boxer Shannon Briggs lose weight. For more information about TRIMSPA Inc. and its products visit http://www.trimspa.com or call 1-800-TRIMSPA.

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