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Image from page 824 of “The Saturday evening post” (1839)

Check out these philadelphia traffic images:

Image from page 824 of “The Saturday evening post” (1839)
philadelphia traffic

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Identifier: saturdayeveningp1933unse
Title: The Saturday evening post
Year: 1839 (1830s)
Authors:
Subjects:
Publisher: Philadelphia : G. Graham
Contributing Library: University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign
Digitizing Sponsor: University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign

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Published Weekly TKe Curtis PublishingCompany Cyrus H. K.Curtis, President OH. Ludington. Vice-President and TreasurerP. S. Collins. General Business ManagerWalter D. Fuller. SecretaryWilliam Boyd. Advertising Director Independence Square,Philadelphia London, CJ. Henrietta StreetCovent Garden.W.C. THE SATURDAYEVENING POST Founded A9D? 1728 by Benj.Franklin Copyright. 1920. by the Curtis Publishing Company in the United Slates and Great Britain George Horace Lorimer EDITOR Churchill Williams, F. S. Bigelow,A W. Neall. Arthur Mctteogh,E. Dinsmore,Associate Editors Entered as Second-Class Matter, November 1*.1*7*3. at the Post Office at Philadelphia.Unde r the Act of March S, 1879Additional Entry as Second-Class Matterat Columbus, Ohio Entered as Second-Class Matter at thePost-Offico Department. Ottawa, Canada Volume 193 £?n THE COPY *Jl 10c. in Canada PHILADELPHIA, PA., DECEMBER 11, 1920 «f O C?f THE YEJ1R*P ^.*JJ ^ Subscription Number 24

Text Appearing After Image:
TRUTH is stranger than fiction, but the illicitliquor traffic is stranger than both. Forty menwriting for forty days couldnt tell a tenth ofthe story of it. The tale ranges from theJrganized making of fortunes by juggling with per-mits to withdraw bonded whisky from warehousesand forging them to the taking of quarters for poi-sonous booze distilled in dirty cellars in the lowestslums. It comprises the daring speculation of keenfnaves who are out for the money, and who take the:hance because of the enormous profits, and the trans-itions of the bartender who will hand out a drinkof doctored stuff for seventy-five cents. It compre-hends lawbreaking in a hundred different ways, fromvast and organized smuggling by land and by sea toburglaries where one bottle is secured. It has to dowith murders, with debaucheries of officials, withcontemptuous defiances of the law by otherwisecorrect citizens, with evasions in restaurants and bydrug stores and doctors, with death from toxicmixtures, with

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Image from page 32 of “Winter journeys in the South; pen and camera impressions of men, manners, women, and things all the way from the blue Gulf and New Orleans through fashionable Florida palms to the pines of Virginia” (1916)
philadelphia traffic

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Identifier: winterjourneysin00hamm
Title: Winter journeys in the South; pen and camera impressions of men, manners, women, and things all the way from the blue Gulf and New Orleans through fashionable Florida palms to the pines of Virginia
Year: 1916 (1910s)
Authors: Hammond, John Martin, 1886-1939
Subjects:
Publisher: Philadelphia & London, J.B. Lippincott company
Contributing Library: The Library of Congress
Digitizing Sponsor: Sloan Foundation

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dining-room door andcame to the nerve center of the hotel. And therebehind the desk were the young men who dis-pensed the nerve of the establishment. I registered,giving my full name and previous condition of ser-vitude, and was shown to a small room on the fifthfloor. It took exactly ten minutes by my faithfulwatch, counting in stops for the elevator, to take onbaggage, and to obey the traffic block signals, to gofrom the desk to my room. The room was small,without a bath, and was rated at six dollars a day,but it was clean and comfortable. The only thing Ihad against the room was its shape. Never have Iseen a room of so unusual shape. The wall awayfrom the one window formed a right angle with thefloor; the wall in which the window was piercedformed a very acute angle with the floor and theother two walls had an angle which I have not beenable to calculate. I could stand up comfortablyagainst the wall away from the window, or I couldstand up comfortably in the dormer of the window.20

Text Appearing After Image:
PALMY PALM BEACH In the other parts of the room I crept like a villainfor my clothes, and when I washed I crouched as ifI were doing a dark and hideous deed, like LadyMacbeth trying to get rid of the spots. Everything about the Poinciana must be cal-culated in terms of pure bulk. The house, when itis full to capacity, and it very frequently is filled, canaccommodate fifteen hundred guests, and this figuredoes not include the number of the employees ofthe establishment. The dining-room is made in two parts with aconnection in the middle like the letter H andis big enough to house a regiment of soldiers. Themenu here is of the same high quality and widevariety as in the other houses of the Florida EastCoast Railway group. But the service is slow, nomatter how good the waiter, as might be expectedfrom the physical difficulties he has to contend within so huge an establishment. Actually a dish mayget cold in being brought from the kitchen to thetable. The popular dining hour at Palm Beach

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417388588_3d74cfc9cf

Nice Liberty Bell photos

A few nice liberty bell images I found:

Liberty Bell IMG_1066
liberty bell

Image by OZinOH
Replica of the Liberty Bell in front of Union Station, Washington, DC.

Replica Liberty Bell at a Firestation in Charlottesville, Va 04
liberty bell

Image by Talusss
203 Ridge Street Charlottesville, Va

Replica Liberty Bell at a Firestation in Charlottesville, Va 06
liberty bell

Image by Talusss
203 Ridge Street Charlottesville, Va

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Biography of Osho

Osho, initially known as Rajneesh Chandra Mohan Jain, arrived on this planet on December 11,1931, in a small village, Kuchwada in Central India. Being the eldest among the 11 kids of a cloth merchant, Osho was a rebellious child. He often asked questions and got into debate with those who used to address religious gatherings in his village. His parents used to tell him to keep his mouth shut before any such gathering, which he rarely did. Osho had a great attachment with rivers. His father used to take him to a river flowing close by his village. He used to spent hours in the waters and developed a relationship and gratitude towards it. He was a good swimmer.

Osho never liked to be spoonfed. Whether it was about learning to ride a bicycle or a car. In his discourses he often quotes that he used to watch others doing the act and learn by their mistakes. For instance, he learned that kids learning bicycle riding tend to fall in the beginning until they manage to balance it and that a certain speed is required to keep the bicycle in balance. And when it was time to take his first ride, he tried the trick and rode so fast that he did not fall once; however, to stop it he had to put the bicycle into a hollow tree, but he did not fall.

In the classroom, he was the biggest challenge for his teachers. He irritated them by repeatedly asking questions after questions. Interestingly, questions were genuine and they were there to be asked and clarified. He just wanted the teachers (one of the teacher) to accept the fact that they do not know if they do not know. That class never made to the second chapter in the mid session until the management had to intervene and Osho was suspended.

At the young age of 21, he became enlightened. He used to sit under a tree at a park in Jabalpur meditating for hours. He was Majoring in Philosophy at that time. He earned his Masters Degree from the University of Sagar with Honors in Philosophy. He was the All-India Debating Champion and Gold Medal winner.

In 1957, he started working as a professor at the Sanskrit College in Raipur. In 1958, he was appointed Professor of Philosophy at the University of Jabalpur, where he taught until 1966. He used to travel throughout the country addressing people and challenging priests and religious heads in public debates.

In 1966, he quit the job with the idea of devoting himself solely to the work of raising human consciousness and started addressing large audiences in the major cities of the country. He conducted meditation camps at least four times a year. Four years later, he introduced ‘Dynamic Meditation’ which was just opposite to the traditional sitting-posture meditation. He said that this form was more suited to a common man who was busy in keeping pace with the world.

He was now called as Bhagwan Shree Rajneesh. People from every corner of the world came to him and he accepted them as his disciples. For seven years, he spoke for more than one and a half hours every morning, alternating every month between Hindi and English. His discourses had been collected in over 600 volumes and translated into 50 languages. He spoke on Buddhism, Jainism, Taoism, Zen, Sufism, etc. He also spoke on Jesus, Islam, Judaism, and Tao and Zen Masters. He gave discourses of various saints and mystics of the world and on various mythological characters.

He used to answer the listeners’ queries after the discourses. They have been complied into diaries and 40 of them have been published.

He had developed a severe back condition and had to visit U.S. for a possible surgery. His followers in U.S. purchased a 64,000-acre land in Oregon and invited him to visit. Osho accepted and soon applied for a permanent residence in America. Thus came into existence, Rajneeshpuram, a commune in the Oregon desert that soon became one of the largest spiritual community in America.

In 1984, Osho’s personal secretary, Ma Anand Sheela and a few others suddenly disappeared from the commune, who were later found to have indulged in some illegal and criminal acts. In October 1985, Osho was arrested with a few others in Charlotte, North Carolina and had to spent 12 days in custody. It is said that it was probable that he was poisoned while in jail; however, it is not confirmed yet. Finally, he was fined heavily and deported from America.

After the Nepalese Government refused visas to his followers in Nepal, he went on to go on a world tour. While he was in Greece, the first country he visited on his world tour, he was arrested and deported. At that time, 17 European and American nations have either refused to grant him a visa or revoke his visa and forced him to leave. Strangely, he was granted permanent residence in Uruguay but only months later he was asked to leave Uruguay.

Next, he was deported from Jamaica and Portugal. Twenty-one countries had denied him entry or deported him after arrival. Yet, he continued his work. He had the most challenging path ever chosen by a mystic. His doors were open for all and whoever wanted to follow was welcomed by him.

On July 29,1986, he returned to Mumbai, India. First, he stopped using the name ‘Bhagwan’ and then dropped ‘Rajneesh’ too. From that moment, he was known as “Osho,” and the ashram renamed “Osho Commune International.”

In January 1990, while at the Osho International Commune, Pune, he became very weak and ill. On January 19, his pulse became irregular. Osho refused cardiac resuscitation. He said,”No, just let me go. Existence decides its timing.” He left his body at 5 p.m. His departure from this planet was celebrated in the auditorium with his body in the center. He was cremated and his ashes were placed in his Samadhi in Chuang Tzu Auditorium, Pune, with the inscription:

OSHO
Never Born
Never Died
Only Visited This Planet Earth Between
11 December 1931 – 19 January 1990

http://www.oshoworld.com/

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Nice Philadelphia Travel Guide photos

A few nice philadelphia travel guide images I found:

Image from page 245 of “The guide-board to health, peace, and competence ; or, the road to happy old age” (1872)
philadelphia travel guide

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Identifier: guideboardtoheal00hallrich
Title: The guide-board to health, peace, and competence ; or, the road to happy old age
Year: 1872 (1870s)
Authors: Hall, William Whitty, 1810-1876
Subjects: Medicine, Popular
Publisher: Springfield, Mass., D.E. Fisk and company Philadelphia, H. N. McKinney & Co
Contributing Library: University of California Libraries
Digitizing Sponsor: MSN

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ted to eat more on that day by its superiorexcellency, aided by idleness, there is of necessity a repletion,an over-supply of food, Avhich will be as certainly disastrousas the feeding of a locomotive with more fuel while she isstanding still than when she is going ahead with her longretinue of passengers and freight. But in a sober, religious point of view, those inviting Sun-day dinners are not judicious; the nervous energy is drawn*.o the stomach in extreme quantities, in order to dispose ofthe over-load, leaving the brain scantily supplied, causingdulness, drowsiness, and almost stupidity, Avholly unfitting themind for proper attention to the religious exercises of theafternoon, the palpable cause of wasted sermons, of wastedopportunities. This subject is worth a serious thought on thepart of pious people, especially those who have a growingfamily. Cold bread and meat, with pie or baked apples, anda single cup of good hot tea or coffee, make a good enoughSunday dinner for anybody.

Text Appearing After Image:
MEDICAL FANTASIES. 213 MEDICAL FANTASIES. One of the earliest Hydropathic prescripticns we read c»fwas recorded long before the days of Priessnitz ; it was giciiby an Ass to a brother Ass, was followed iwitantery to thedeath, and has been kept in the same style ever since. Thelegend goes in this wise : — Two donkeys were travelling one hot sumraers day, heav-ily laden, one with a sack of wool, the other with a sack ofyalt. Almost exhausted with heat and fatigue, they came atlength to a river; and, wiselj enough, it was concluded thatone should try the ford first. The one with the salt plungedin, and on reaching the opposite shore safely, found himselfso much refreshed by the cooling of the waters, and so invig-orated was he, that he felt all at once as if he had no load atall, — as if he could carry two or three sacks more; and,being naturally benevolent, he urged his companion to lose notime, and plunge into the stream, triumphantly pleading hisown delightful experience ; so As

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Image from page 103 of “The stranger’s illustrated pocket guide to Philadelphia, embracing a description of the principal objects of interest in and around the city, with directions how to reach them” (1876)
philadelphia travel guide

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Identifier: strangersillustr00phil
Title: The stranger’s illustrated pocket guide to Philadelphia, embracing a description of the principal objects of interest in and around the city, with directions how to reach them
Year: 1876 (1870s)
Authors:
Subjects: Centennial Exhibition (1876 : Philadelphia, Pa.)
Publisher: Philadelphia, J.B. Lippincott & co.
Contributing Library: The Library of Congress
Digitizing Sponsor: The Library of Congress

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ands Strawberry Mansion, now kept as a Park restau-rant. But chief among the attractions of the upper Schuylkill is thebeautiful Laurel Hill Cemetery, the most celebrated of all the ruralburial-places near the city. A short distance above Laurel Hill standsFalls Village,—the terminus of the steamboat route from Fairmount,—beyond which the Schuylkill is joined by its romantic affluent, theWissahickon (q. v.). 96 STREETS.—ARCH STREET.STREETS. Arch Street, though a wide and handsome avenue, has never foundits course obstructed by such a tide of travel and traffic as surgesthrough some of the other streets. It has always been eminentlyrespectable, and a certain air of old-time gentility still invests it; onefeels that, in passing from Market to Arch, he has unconsciously steppedback fifty years into the past; the roar and hurry of to-day have givenway to the steady-going, quiet ways of the earlier years of the century,and he would scarcely be surprised to see a gentleman in powdered

Text Appearing After Image:
franklins grave. wig, knee-breeches, and three-cornered hat descending from any one ofthe stately dwellings whose uniform brick fronts, green shutters, andmarble steps are the representatives of, if not the foundation for, themonotonous Philadelphia which satirical visitors are fond of depicting.The lower part of the street has, indeed, been invaded, to a certain ex-tent, by the bustling life of commerce ; but west of Eleventh Street allis quiet, and the street is lined with the dwellings of the merchantprinces of the city. STREETS.—BROAD STREET. 97 Consequently, we have few points of interest to note here. In ourwalk up-street, we stop, of course, to look through the iron railing setin the wall of Christ Church burying-ground, at Fifth and Arch, andpay our homage to the grave of Benjamin Franklin ; and we cannot failto notice, as we pass, the ancient Friends Meeting-House which standson the south side of the street, between Third and Fourth, surroundedby a yard whose dimensions sug

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6198383643_78f6445c64

St. Louis Cardinals vs. Philadelphia Phillies (MSA)

Check out these philadelphia tourism images:

St. Louis Cardinals vs. Philadelphia Phillies (MSA)
philadelphia tourism

Image by MissouriStateArchives
Collection Name: Division of Tourism Collection

Photographer/Studio: PC

Description: St. Louis Cardinals player Willie McGee tags second base during a game at Busch Stadium

Coverage: United States – Missouri – St. Louis – St. Louis City

Date: 1988

Rights: Copyright is in the public domain.

Credit: Courtesy of Missouri State Archives

Image Number: Tourism(B)_016-03210

Institution: Missouri State Archives

tourism
philadelphia tourism

Image by cliplet

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Alfred Angelo Bridal Gown History

Not all bridal designers have to design bridal gowns that cost an arm and a leg. Alfred Angelo Bridal is really an international vendor and retailer of affordable wedding dresses based in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, United States. Although the corporation is well known for Alfred Angelo wedding dress, they still designed bridesmaid gowns, trends for flower girl dresses, mother of the bride / groom dresses, together with other wedding accessories. Prom dress styles will also be fashioned under a number of brand lines.

Background

In the mid 1930’s, Alfred Angelo and his wife Edythe Piccione opened their first store in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. They started out wholesaling Alfred Angelo bridal gowns and attempting to provide inexpensive bridal gowns that everyone could buy. Edythe began designing the Alfred Angelo wedding dress in 1935 because the quality of gowns they were selling may let them down sometimes. They chose quality fabrics and designed by themselves. The happy couple insisted on basic white and ivory gowns until 1960s, their kids Vincent and Michele Piccione, took over gown design. By the end of the decade, they actually started handling the company. This company employed Michael Shettel as V.P. of Design in the 1990s and he added more intricate designs and diversity of colors. After turning into a business leader in the USA, the corporation began marketing worldwide to countries such as the Australia, UK, New Zealand and Canada.

Nowadays the enterprise remains possessed by the Piccione family. Alfred Angelo bridal gowns are available at company-possessed retail places, known as “Signature Stores” in America, as well as a large number of partner stores around the world.

Michael Shettel – Wedding Style Designer

At the moment, Michael Shettel manages the design group. Shettel studied fashion design in the Fashion Institute of Technology in NY. He’s been a lead designer for Alfred Angelo since 1999. Shettel and the design group choose fabrics manually for all those gowns designed in the 0-30 range but additionally in regular length, short and long lengths.

Well known inclusions in the Alfred Angelo fashion line under Shettel’s guidance are the designs in the Dream in Color collection that permit brides to choose from fifty-five various shades to increase a panel train, a trim on the neckline, or perhaps a sash. Alfred Angelo bridesmaid gowns will also be a touch to the fashion line under Shettel.

Signature Stores

Alfred Angelo Signature Stores can be found in eighteen US states having a lot of retail stores in Texas, Florida, Pennsylvania, and California. Other US locations for Signature Stores can be found in the following states: Alabama, Washington, Arkansas, Virginia, Arizona, Tennessee, Mississippi, Oklahoma, Maryland, Ohio, NY, Louisiana, Nevada, Nebraska, and New Mexico. They employ more than 3,000 people across the country. Alfred Angelo also sells bridal fashions at many of partner stores over the US and globally.

In the retail areas, gowns can be found from size 0-30 for wedding brides and bridesmaids. Prom dresses in the retail locations can also be found in the identical size range. The shops have a series of styles and lines in the Piccione Bridal, Alfred Angelo collection, Niki White collections, as well as the A.A. Sapphire.

In September 2010, by cooperation with Disney, this company announced the debut of the collection of princess-inspired wedding gowns from well-known Disney animated films like Aladdin, Sleeping Beauty, Snow White, The Little Mermaid, Cinderella, Beauty and the Beast.

Ask Meenouir Cheung, who is from www.DressesShop.com, for advice in areas of Wedding Dresses and Party Dresses. We write numerous articles providing information for the customers. We carry a fabulous collection of Wedding Dresses designed to complement your bridal outfit.

Raul Guerrero: Past & Present

San Diego, CA (PRWEB) July 25, 2006

L Street Gallery, in conjunction with SanDiegoArtist.com, is pleased to announce: Raul Guerrero: Past & Present: a comprehensive survey of Guerrero’s work since 1974. The online retrospective will be available for viewing from July 15 – September 30, 2006 at SanDiegoArtist.com and will highlight 30 years of work by Raul Guerrero. This survey includes over 50 works — ranging from his well-known Tijuana Nightlife paintings to earlier sculptures, installations and kinetic works — from each phase of the artist’s career.

The exhibition, Southern California: Recent Works by Raul Guerrero, will open on August 26 with an opening reception from 6pm – 9pm at the L Street Gallery and will be on view through November 31, 2006. Both the online and gallery exhibit have been organized by Ann Berchtold, curator of SanDiegoArtist.com and newly appointed gallery director for the L Street Gallery at the Omni Hotel in Downtown San Diego.

”Raul Guerrero has been an important presence on the Southern California art scene-particularly in the San Diego/Tijuana region– for more than thirty years. Making paintings, sculptures, prints, drawings, photographs, and videotapes, he has forged an expansive, ever-evolving vision-one that combines technical innovation with symbolic power. Although his style ranges from early conceptually based abstraction to recent narrative realism, Guerrero’s self-described “search for the poetry of life” is a constant in all of this work. Traveling and reading voraciously, Guerrero continually engages the histories of culture in the United States, Latin America, and Europe, culling images and ideas for his art.” Written by Toby Kamps, 1998, Assistant Curator Museum of Contemporary Art, San Diego.

Guerrero spent four years (1966 – 1970) at the Chouinard Art Institute studying with professors like Emerson Woelffer, Mike Kanemitsu, Don Graham, Ed Reep and Stephen Van Heune. At that time Chouinard students were witnessing the emergence of cutting edge artists such as Richard Serra, Andy Warhol, Frank Stella, Edward Ruscha, Edward Kienholz, Bruce Nauman and the Los Angeles art scene. Says Guerrero of that period, “In LA, I was embedded in an art culture that made a big difference in my life. Up to that time I felt alienated for some reason or another – and that scene was like finding my tribe.” Guerrero had his first celebrated solo exhibit at the Cirrus Gallery, LA in 1974 and followed with four more successful LA based exhibits. Guerrero left LA in January of 1980 and moved back to San Diego. Guerrero has since gradually and steadily assumed the characteristics of a successful career and has become one of our most outstanding artists. After countless solo and joint exhibits his first major retrospective was presented at the Museum of Contemporary Art, San Diego in 1998.

His latest body of work, Problems and Marvelous Secrets of the Indies, which has been fifteen years in the making, is a history of the American continent presented in three parts: Black Hills of Dakota, Latin America and Southern California. In describing the series, Guerrero imagines two travelers chronicling their respective journeys as they move through time and geography within the continent. “The first traveler is coming from the Eastern seaboard and traveling west, encountering defining moments in the evolving history of the United States, eventually arriving in Southern California. The second traveler leaves Peru, treks thru South America, Central America, Mexico, eventually arriving in Southern California.” Structuring research for the series in this manner allowed the artist to create a non-linear visual and poetic map of the territory, expressed in a variety of mediums, including painting, drawing, mosaic work, artist books, photography and bronze sculpture.

Guerrero continues: “Eventually the two travelers converge in Southern California, becoming witnesses of the hybrid culture from which they sprang, an infrastructure made up of Anglo-American, Indigenous and Latino influences. As one, they experience the strange surreal cultural phenomena that is Southern California with its ‘dive bars,’ take-out food culture, its highly industrialized consumer society and of course Hollywood, the ultimate surreal dream machine.”

In a painting titled, The Lovers; a French fry is seen lying on a beach towel, while an elongated splash of ketchup hovers over seductively. The “lovers” are surrounded by a sandy beach and blue sky, and represent Southern California’s most perfect and sought after couple. The composition, The Lovers, was inspired by Man Ray’s classic surrealistic painting, A l’heure de l’observatoire—Les Amoureux; (Observatory Time–The Lovers).

Raul Guerrero’s style and approach to art has been described in many ways, poetically by Michael McManus for ART WEEK in 1988. He states, “Guerrero is a dance photographer, an elitist, late of the school of Paris and a disciple of the dadaist Many Ray; he’s political, a Chicano activist excavating the Olmec roots of his consciousness; he’s the Prince of Oaxaca, a peripheral figure in the L.A. pop scene; he’s a conceptual artist, a California surrealist; protégé of Emerson Woelffer; he’s an oil painter in the Academy San Carlos tradition, devoted to the memory of Dr. Atl and Diego Rivera; he’s an ironist, a constructivist, a Jungian, a comedian.”

2006 kicked off a series of joint exhibits for Raul Guerrero beginning in April with a show at the Billy Shire Fine Arts Gallery in Culver City: Problemas y Secretos Maravillosos de Las Indies/Problems and Marvelous Secrets of the Indies, which ran from April 15 – May 20, 2006. Guerrero is currently part of the Strange New World: Art and Design From Tijuana, which is running concurrently at both MCASD Downtown and MCASD La Jolla. His work will be featured at the de Young Museum in San Francisco, as part of the exhibition: Chicano Visions: American Painters on the Verge running from July 22 – October 22, which includes works of some of the country’s best Chicano and Chicana artists. Works by Guerrero are also currently being featured in Ravenna Italy at the Galleria Ninapi.

###







gI_143862_Health-Wellness

Announcing New Episode Airing of Innovations November 17th via Discovery Channel


Jupiter, FL (PRWEB) November 10, 2014

DMG Productions announces the upcoming airing of Innovations with Ed Begley, Jr., scheduled to broadcast on Monday, November 17, 2014 at 7:30 a.m. EST and 7:30 a.m. PST, via Discovery Channel.

In this episode, viewers take a behind-the-scenes look at Austen Riggs’ residential and hospital-level psychiatric treatment, provided by psychiatrists and psychologists who have advanced and specialized training.

Next, the show travels to Woodbury, Minnesota, in order to educate viewers on Haven Chemical’s residential and outpatient chemical dependency treatment services.

Audiences will learn about Migraine Miracle®’s ability to provide natural relief for migraine pain. Viewers will learn how, through the use of cold marble stones and aromatherapy products, Migraine Miracle® targets the four types of migraines most people suffer from, including those caused by allergies, environmental agitation, stress/caffeine addiction, and hormonal imbalances.

Additionally, Innovations will showcase Hill-Rom’s Vest® Airway Clearance System, which is designed to assist patients in the mobilization of retained secretions. Viewers will be captivated by the Vest® System, which can assist in airway clearance for patients.

“We look forward to educating the public on the services and capabilities available to the public,” said Michele Nehls, Producer for the series. “From mental health to overall wellness, this episode is sure to be informative.”

About Innovations & DMG Productions:

Innovations, hosted by award winning actor Ed Begley, Jr., is an information-based series geared toward educating the public on the latest breakthroughs in all areas of society. Featuring practical solutions and important issues facing consumers and professionals alike, Innovations focuses on cutting-edge advancements in everything from health and wellness to global business, renewable energy, and more.

DMG Productions (responsible for creating the Innovations show) includes personnel specialized in various fields from agriculture to medicine, independent films to regional news and more. Our field producers work closely with experts in the field to develop stories. This powerful force enables us to consistently produce commercial-free, educational programming that both viewers and networks depend on.

For more information visit: http://www.InnovationsTelevision.com. You can also contact Michele Nehls at (866) 496-4065 x 822 or via email at: Michele(at)InnovationsTelevision(dot)com







9354112656_9182e1f958

Storm in Philadelphhia-Colonial America-United States-Independence Hall-714-Knotts Berry Farm-Founding Fathers

Check out these independence hall images:

Storm in Philadelphhia-Colonial America-United States-Independence Hall-714-Knotts Berry Farm-Founding Fathers
independence hall

Image by Edward Headington
Shots of Independence Hall at Knott’s Berry Farm.

Inside Independence Hall
independence hall

Image by Cle0patra

Image from page 98 of “An historical account of the old State house of Pennsylvania now known as the Hall of independence” (1876)
independence hall

Image by Internet Archive Book Images
Identifier: historicalaccoun01etti
Title: An historical account of the old State house of Pennsylvania now known as the Hall of independence
Year: 1876 (1870s)
Authors: Etting, Frank M. (Frank Marx)
Subjects: Independence Hall (Philadelphia, Pa.)
Publisher: Boston, J. R. Osgood and company
Contributing Library: The Library of Congress
Digitizing Sponsor: Sloan Foundation

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REMNANT OF STAMPED PAPER. 59

Text Appearing After Image:
^mLcL co>^ctv^^ /f- a^U^i^ d)-^ Jl(yn£j^ uyiic^k icUtCu

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