14339282359_9e6c0f9a78

Cool Liberty Bell images

Check out these liberty bell images:

20th Street, between 8th & 9th Ave
liberty bell

Image by Ed Yourdon
These are all "extras" that I took while I was out walking around on my "everyblock" project — not good enough to foist upon the Flickr community as a "public" photo … but pictures that probably deserve a slightly better fate than just being deleted…

***************

This set of photos is based on a very simple concept: walk every block of Manhattan with a camera, and see what happens. To avoid missing anything, walk both sides of the street.

That’s all there is to it …

Of course, if you wanted to be more ambitious, you could also walk the streets of Brooklyn, Queens, Staten Island, and the Bronx. But that’s more than I’m willing to commit to at this point, and I’ll leave the remaining boroughs of New York City to other, more adventurous photographers.

Oh, actually, there’s one more small detail: leave the photos alone for a month — unedited, untouched, and unviewed. By the time I actually focus on the first of these "every-block" photos, I will have taken more than 8,000 images on the nearby streets of the Upper West Side — plus another several thousand in Rome, Coney Island, and the various spots in NYC where I traditionally take photos. So I don’t expect to be emotionally attached to any of the "every-block" photos, and hope that I’ll be able to make an objective selection of the ones worth looking at.

As for the criteria that I’ve used to select the small subset of every-block photos that get uploaded to Flickr: there are three. First, I’ll upload any photo that I think is "great," and where I hope the reaction of my Flickr-friends will be, "I have no idea when or where that photo was taken, but it’s really a terrific picture!"

A second criterion has to do with place, and the third involves time. I’m hoping that I’ll take some photos that clearly say, "This is New York!" to anyone who looks at it. Obviously, certain landscape icons like the Empire State Building or the Statue of Liberty would satisfy that criterion; but I’m hoping that I’ll find other, more unexpected examples. I hope that I’ll be able to take some shots that will make a "local" viewer say, "Well, even if that’s not recognizable to someone from another part of the country, or another part of the world, I know that that’s New York!" And there might be some photos where a "non-local" viewer might say, "I had no idea that there was anyplace in New York City that was so interesting/beautiful/ugly/spectacular."

As for the sense of time: I remember wandering around my neighborhood in 2005, photographing various shops, stores, restaurants, and business establishments — and then casually looking at the photos about five years later, and being stunned by how much had changed. Little by little, store by store, day by day, things change … and when you’ve been around as long as I have, it’s even more amazing to go back and look at the photos you took thirty or forty years ago, and ask yourself, "Was it really like that back then? Seriously, did people really wear bell-bottom jeans?"

So, with the expectation that I’ll be looking at these every-block photos five or ten years from now (and maybe you will be, too), I’m going to be doing my best to capture scenes that convey the sense that they were taken in the year 2013 … or at least sometime in the decade of the 2010’s (I have no idea what we’re calling this decade yet). Or maybe they’ll just say to us, "This is what it was like a dozen years after 9-11".

Movie posters are a trivial example of such a time-specific image; I’ve already taken a bunch, and I don’t know if I’ll ultimately decide that they’re worth uploading. Women’s fashion/styles are another obvious example of a time-specific phenomenon; and even though I’m definitely not a fashion expert, I suspected that I’ll be able to look at some images ten years from now and mutter to myself, "Did we really wear shirts like that? Did women really wear those weird skirts that are short in the front, and long in the back? Did everyone in New York have a tattoo?"

Another example: I’m fascinated by the interactions that people have with their cellphones out on the street. It seems that everyone has one, which certainly wasn’t true a decade ago; and it seems that everyone walks down the street with their eyes and their entire conscious attention riveted on this little box-like gadget, utterly oblivious about anything else that might be going on (among other things, that makes it very easy for me to photograph them without their even noticing, particularly if they’ve also got earphones so they can listen to music or carry on a phone conversation). But I can’t help wondering whether this kind of social behavior will seem bizarre a decade from now … especially if our cellphones have become so miniaturized that they’re incorporated into the glasses we wear, or implanted directly into our eyeballs.

Oh, one last thing: I’ve created a customized Google Map to show the precise details of each day’s photo-walk. I’ll be updating it each day, and the most recent part of my every-block journey will be marked in red, to differentiate it from all of the older segments of the journey, which will be shown in blue. You can see the map, and peek at it each day to see where I’ve been, by clicking on this link

URL link to Ed’s every-block progress through Manhattan

If you have any suggestions about places that I should definitely visit to get some good photos, or if you’d like me to photograph you in your little corner of New York City, please let me know. You can send me a Flickr-mail message, or you can email me directly at ed-at-yourdon-dot-com

Stay tuned as the photo-walk continues, block by block …

Liberty Bell History
liberty bell

Image by Emily Barney
I didn’t really know anything about the liberty bell, so learning that it was renamed such by the abolitionist movement was interesting

8071696472_bb9d6c8839

Authentic Diner Mug

Some cool philadelphia travel company images:

Authentic Diner Mug
philadelphia travel company

Image by MarkGregory007
I was having lunch in a local 50’s style diner when I spotted a rack of coffee cups on a shelf behind the counter. I asked the owner if I could buy one and he said, "Sure, five dollars."

This cup has the look and feel of the heavy diner mugs from the 1960’s. On the bottom it says "Homer Laughlin China, U.S.A. Lead free." I searched the internet and learned that this company was established in the 1800’s. it has a very interesting history……

COMPANY HISTORY FROM WEBSITE

Homer and Shakespeare Laughlin, two brothers from East Liverpool, Ohio, formed a partnership in 1871 to sell pottery ware, which was made in the factories located in their hometown.

The pottery industry in East Liverpool had begun in the 1840’s, manufacturing yellow ware from the rich deposits of local clay and utilizing the Ohio River to transport their products throughout the region. By 1870, public preference was shifting from the relatively crude yellow ware to a more sophisticated white ware that was being imported from England. Local potters saw the need for change and the East Liverpool City Council offered ,000 in seed money to someone who would build and operate a pottery for the production of white ware.

The Laughlin Brothers submitted a proposal which was accepted by the Council and a two-kiln plant was built on the banks of the Ohio River in 1873. The plant was built on land purchased from Benjamin Harker for 0. Mr. Harker’s pottery was located next door.

The Laughlin Brothers quickly gained a reputation for quality and, in 1876, their white granite ware won an award at the United States Centennial Exposition in Philadelphia. By 1877, Shakespeare, the younger brother, was ready to move on to pursue other interests. The business was continued as an individual enterprise as the Homer Laughlin China Works. The business continued to prosper through the 1880’s and became one of the better known manufacturers of ceramic dinnerware and toilet ware in the United States.

The Wells & Aaron Families

In 1889, a young bookkeeper from Steubenville, Ohio, William Edwin Wells, answered a classified newspaper advertisement and was hired to manage the books of the growing establishment. In a very short time, Mr. Wells was managing the business and Mr. Laughlin was able to spend time traveling with his wife.

By 1897, Homer Laughlin had decided to retire to California where his son had just graduated from Stanford University. He offered to sell the business to Mr. Wells and a financial partner, Louis I. Aaron of Pittsburgh. The sale was consummated on December 7, 1897.

With new ownership came accelerated growth. Within two years, a second plant was built in the East End of East Liverpool, expanding further to three East End plants by 1903. Key customers contributing to the company’s rapid growth included the F. W. Woolworth Company, the country’s fastest growing variety (5 & 10 cent) store chain, and the American Cereal Company of Chicago, who was packing oatmeal bowls in Mother’s Oats boxes as fast as Homer Laughlin could produce them.

The Move to Newell, WV

The partners saw the need for further expansion but there was no more room at the East End location. In 1902, a tract of land on the opposite side of the Ohio River was purchased from the Newell family. A subsidiary company, the North American Manufacturing Company was formed to develop the town, which would become Newell, West Virginia. Building lots were laid out, a water and sewer system was installed, and electric power was secured. A suspension bridge was built across the Ohio River, connecting the new community with East Liverpool and a trolley line was built to transport pottery workers across the river. During 1905 and 1906, the company constructed plant #4, which at that time, was the largest pottery plant ever built in the world. Homer Laughlin now had a combined production capacity of 300,000 pieces of ware per day (10% of the U. S. production capacity). The company’s headquarters were moved to the Newell location at the beginning of 1907.

The 1910’s

In 1911, Louis Aaron retired and was succeeded as president of Homer Laughlin by his son, Marcus Aaron. Rapid growth continued and, in 1914, plant #5 was opened with 16 additional kilns, giving the company a total of 78 ware kilns and 60 decorating kilns.

In January, 1917, W. E. Wells wrote to the Woolworth Company to recap their business for the year of 1916. He stated “I think that I may safely say that this is the first time in history that the purchases of any one concern from any one pottery firm have reached the million (dollar) mark in one year”. At an average price of 72 cents per dozen, that amounted to 16.7 million pieces of ware sold to one customer in one year.

The 1920’s

The early 1920’s marked the beginning of the most revolutionary change that had ever hit the pottery industry. Until that time, a pottery’s size was measured by the number of ware kilns that it possessed. Intermittent bottle kilns had a limited production capacity due to the length of time that it took to load the kiln, brick up the doorway, fire the kiln and bring it up to the desired temperature, fire the ware for the desired length of time, then cool the kiln, reopen the doorway and, after cooling, empty the kiln by hand. All of this required more than a week to fire a limited amount of ware. The only way that a pottery could increase it’s capacity was to build more kilns.

In the early 1920’s, continuous firing tunnel kilns were introduced to the industry. These kilns maintained their full firing temperatures constantly while cars entered one end, one after another and, three days later, fired ware exited the other end of the kiln. This was a revolutionary change in production time and the potteries with the financial resources rushed to build these new kilns.

In 1923, Homer Laughlin announced that they would build yet another new plant, this time with tunnel kilns. Plant #6 fired it’s first kiln in 1924. At about this same time, the intermittent kilns at plants 4 & 5 were replaced with tunnel kilns. In 1927, plant #7, equal in size to plant 6, was opened.

It was decided that it would not be practical to remodel the old plants in the East End and they were phased out in favor of the largest Laughlin plant yet. Plant #8 opened in December, 1929 with 800 employees in that plant alone. Initially, all of plant #8 production was allocated to make ware for Woolworth’s. Total capacity was now equal to 160 upright kilns.

1930’s & 1940’s

Almost coincidental with the opening of the last great Newell plant was the retirement of W. E. Wells in January, 1930. He was replaced as general manager by his eldest son, Joseph M. Wells, Sr.

The company had hired Frederick Hurten Rhead as design director in 1927, a post which he would hold until his death in 1942. Rhead’s 15 year reign proved to be the most prolific period of new product introductions in the company’s history. Rhead designed Virginia Rose as well as the several Eggshell shapes. Rhead’s most famous accomplishment, however, was Fiesta.
Marcus Aaron retired as president of the company in 1940 and was succeeded by his son, Marcus Lester Aaron. M. L. Aaron would serve as president for the next forty-eight years.

With Fiesta leading the way, The Homer Laughlin China Company continued to flourish until the onset of World War II. During the war years, much of the company’s production was shifted to the production of china for our armed forces. After the war, production returned to normal and the company reached it’s peak production year in 1948. More than 3,000 workers were employed to produce over ten million dozen pieces of ware.

The 3rd Generation from 1950’s—1990’s

The 1950’s saw a large increase in imported dinnerware which was produced in countries with very low labor costs. This competition took it’s toll on the American industry and many potteries did not survive the decade. Homer Laughlin’s management decided to shift their emphasis from consumer dinnerware to commercial ware for the hotel and restaurant trade. 1959 saw the introduction of Homer Laughlin’s “Best China” brand vitrified hotel china.

J. M. Wells, Sr. retired at the end of that year, turning over the management of the company to the third generation of his family in the person of Joe Wells, Jr.

The sixties and seventies were difficult years for the American pottery industry, with low-cost imports carving out market share in the retail markets at the expense of domestic companies. Homer Laughlin’s hotel ware was gradually becoming a prominent player in the foodservice china industry, eventually overtaking retail dinnerware in sales volume.

In the early eighties, the company began to produce lead-free china, something that would become very important as the country became more environmentally conscious. Using lead-free glazes and a vitrified china body, Fiesta was reintroduced in new and updated colors. As this new version of their most famous product was being launched, Joe Wells, Jr. retired in 1986 and was replaced as executive vice president by his son, Joe Wells III. At the end of 1988, M. L. Aaron retired as company president and was succeeded by his son, Marcus (Pete) Aaron II. The company was now in the hands of the fourth generation of each family.

The New Century

As Fiesta began to flourish in the retail sector and Homer Laughlin was becoming a leading force in the foodservice china industry, the aging factories were undergoing many changes. State-of-the-art computerized kilns were installed throughout plants 6, 7 and 8. Much-needed new forming and glazing equipment was installed and a self-contained “plant within a plant” was built at Plant #8. Homer Laughlin was preparing to enter the new millennium as the industry leader in both the foodservice and retail businesses.

By 2002, ownership of the company was shared by third, fourth and fifth generation members of the Wells and Aaron families and others. Many of the shareholders were scattered throughout the country and had little involvement with the business. In an effort to consolidate resources and provide improved direction for the company, Joe Wells III, together with his sisters, Jean Wicks and Elizabeth McIlvain, purchased the interests of the other stockholders. In June, 2002, Joe Wells III was elected president and chief executive officer.

Since the re-organization, the company has experienced continued growth and is poised to move forward with the Wells Family’s pledge to continue producing quality, American-made china and provide jobs for potters of the Ohio Valley.

NOTE: Mug purchased on October 9, 2012

Image from page 157 of “Across the continent and around the world” (1872)
philadelphia travel company

Image by Internet Archive Book Images
Identifier: acrosscontinenta00dist
Title: Across the continent and around the world
Year: 1872 (1870s)
Authors: [Disturnell, John] 1801-1877. [from old catalog]
Subjects: Railroads Steamboat lines. [from old catalog] Distances Travel
Publisher: Philadelphia, W. B. Zieber
Contributing Library: The Library of Congress
Digitizing Sponsor: The Library of Congress

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Register. CANADA 4500 GREECE 4500 THE QUEEN 4470 ENGLAND 4130 HELVETIA 4020 ERIN 4040 The Steamships of this Line are full powered, and the largest in the Atlantic serviceleaving the port of New York. They are built in water-tight compartments, and are spar-decked, thus affording every convenience for the comfort of Passengers, and securing speedand safety with economy. Cabin accommodations unsurpassed. One of the above Magnificent Iron Steamships will leave Piers 44 or 47 North River,EVERY SATURDAY FOR LIVERPOOL, calling at Quoenstown to land Passengers. FROM LIVERPOOL FOR NEW YORK, EVERY WEDNESDAY.FROM QUEENSTOWN, EVERY THURSDAY. FORTNIGHTLY to and from London direct. CABIN PASSAGE to Liverpool orQueenstown, and , payable in Currency. i^S^Persons intending to engage Passage are invited to inspect these Steamers beforebooking elsewhere. For Freight, Cabin or Steerage Passage, apply at the Companys Office, No. 69 Broadway, Iff. IT. F. W. J. HURST, Manager. NEW YORK TO CARDIFF.

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South Wales Atlantic Steamship Gos NEW, FIBST-CLASS, FULL-POWERED GLAMORGAN,PEMBROKE,CARMARTHEN, – 2,5002,SOO3,000 Tons. Will commence a regular service between the above ports, in May, 1872, carryingGoods and Passengers, at Through Rates, from all parts of the United States andCanada, to ports in the Bristol Channel, and all other points in England. These Steamships, built expressly for the trade, are provided with all the latestimprovements for the comfort and convenience of CABIN AND STEERAGE PASSENGERS. FAKES AS LOW AS BY ANT OTHER HRST-CLASS LINE. BRINGS THE TRAVELLER NEARER TO THAN THAT VIA LIVERPOOL. For further particulars, apply in CARDIFF, at the Companys Offices, 1 DockChambers; and, in NEW YORK, to ARCHIBALD BAXTER & 00., Agents, No. 17 Broadway. New York, April 24,1872. NEW YORK, GORK AND LIVERPOOL NEW AND FULL-POWERED STEAMSHIPS. THE SIX LARGEST IN THE WORLD. OCEANIC,ATLANTIC, BEPOBEIC,AGEIATIC, CELTIC,BALTIC, 6,000 TONS BURDEN—3,000 H. P. EACH. Sailing from New Yo

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Image from page 407 of “Book of the Royal blue” (1897)
philadelphia travel company

Image by Internet Archive Book Images
Identifier: bookofroyalblue22balt
Title: Book of the Royal blue
Year: 1897 (1890s)
Authors: Baltimore and Ohio railroad company. [from old catalog]
Subjects: Middle Atlantic States — Description and travel
Publisher: Baltimore
Contributing Library: The Library of Congress
Digitizing Sponsor: Sloan Foundation

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Y. a new vocabulary. No straining or ex-pansion of a terminology derived fromthe upper world will enable it to describeadequately the wonderful phenomenapresented in this realm of stalacta. Thevisitor who attempts description mustbe content, therefore, with seeking toimpart enthusiasm without hoping totrace fully its causes. This only willremain clearly understood—the felicityof having experiencd a sensation alto-gether novel. The Persian monarchs desire — anew pleasure—is secured at length to the world in the Caverns of Luray.Luray Caverns are located on theline of the Norfolk & Western Railway,sixty-five miles from Shenandoah Junc-tion, on the line of the Baltimore & OhioRailroad. Excursions are run everysummer and fall from Philadelphia.Baltimore. Washington and intermediate points on the Baltimore & OhioRailroad, and special excursion ratesfor the summer touring season are tobe obtained from nearly every portionof the United States east of the Missis-sippi River.

Text Appearing After Image:

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2751686986_38204a98b7

Bucolic Countryside, Ridge Road, Intercourse, Pennsylvania

Some cool philadelphia tourism images:

Bucolic Countryside, Ridge Road, Intercourse, Pennsylvania
philadelphia tourism

Image by Ken Lund
Pennsylvania Dutch Country, also called the Deitscherei in Deitsch, refers to an area of southeastern Pennsylvania, United States that by the American Revolution had a high percentage of Pennsylvania Dutch inhabitants. Religiously, there was a large portion of Lutherans. There were also German Reformed, Moravian, Amish, Mennonite, and other German Christian sects. The term was used in the middle of the 20th century as a description of a region with a distinctive Pennsylvania Dutch culture, but in recent decades the composition of the population is changing and the phrase is used more now in a tourism context than any other.

Geographically the area referred to as Amish/Dutch country centers around the cities of Allentown, Hershey, Lancaster, Reading, and York. Pennsylvania Dutch Country encompasses the counties of Chester, Lancaster, York, Adams, Franklin, Dauphin, Lebanon, Berks, Montgomery, Bucks, Northampton, Lehigh, Schuylkill, Snyder, Union, Juniata, Mifflin, Huntingdon, Northumberland, and Centre. Pennsylvania Dutch immigrants would spread from this area outwards outside the Pennsylvania borders between the mountains along river valleys into neighboring Maryland (Washington and Frederick counties), West Virginia, New Jersey (Warren and northern Hunterdon counties), Virginia (Shenandoah Valley), and North Carolina. The larger region has been historically referred to as Greater Pennsylvania. The historic Pennsylvania Dutch diaspora in Ontario, Canada has been referred to as Little Pennsylvania.

The western counties of the region experienced industrialization as well, with Hershey Foods being the most notable example, but it was less intensive, and agriculture retained a larger share of the economy. In the middle of the 20th century, both Amish and non-Amish entrepreneurs began to promote the area as a tourist destination. Though there are still plenty of Amish attempting to follow their traditional way of life, tourism and population growth have significantly changed the appearance and cultural flavor of the area. The region is within 50 miles of Philadelphia, Baltimore, Maryland, and Harrisburg, Pennsylvania, and has not escaped the effects of being located on the western edge of the East Coast conurbation which stretches from Washington, D.C. to New York City.

The Old Order Amish and Old Order Mennonites, who have resisted these urbanization efforts most successfully, have retained aspects of their 18th century way of life, including the Deitsch dialect; however, these groups have changed significantly in the last two hundred years. Nevertheless, for the Old Order groups, change has come slower, and gradually they have become more and more distinctively different as the surrounding rural and urban population of Pennsylvania has changed.

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pennsylvania_Dutch_Country

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikipedia:Text_of_Creative_Commons_…

Rio
philadelphia tourism

Image by carlosoliveirareis
@ Philadelphia PA, EUA

IMG_0440

Citizens Bank Park
philadelphia tourism

Image by captaincmb

15224394854_296e8a2ea3

A sign of the times: nobody pays any attention to a beautiful laptop with a woman attached to it.

Check out these liberty bell images:

A sign of the times: nobody pays any attention to a beautiful laptop with a woman attached to it.
liberty bell

Image by Ed Yourdon
This was taken in Washington Square Park.

***************

This set of photos is based on a very simple concept: walk every block of Manhattan with a camera, and see what happens. To avoid missing anything, walk both sides of the street.

That’s all there is to it …

Of course, if you wanted to be more ambitious, you could also walk the streets of Brooklyn, Queens, Staten Island, and the Bronx. But that’s more than I’m willing to commit to at this point, and I’ll leave the remaining boroughs of New York City to other, more adventurous photographers.

Oh, actually, there’s one more small detail: leave the photos alone for a month — unedited, untouched, and unviewed. By the time I actually focus on the first of these "every-block" photos, I will have taken more than 8,000 images on the nearby streets of the Upper West Side — plus another several thousand in Rome, Coney Island, and the various spots in NYC where I traditionally take photos. So I don’t expect to be emotionally attached to any of the "every-block" photos, and hope that I’ll be able to make an objective selection of the ones worth looking at.

As for the criteria that I’ve used to select the small subset of every-block photos that get uploaded to Flickr: there are three. First, I’ll upload any photo that I think is "great," and where I hope the reaction of my Flickr-friends will be, "I have no idea when or where that photo was taken, but it’s really a terrific picture!"

A second criterion has to do with place, and the third involves time. I’m hoping that I’ll take some photos that clearly say, "This is New York!" to anyone who looks at it. Obviously, certain landscape icons like the Empire State Building or the Statue of Liberty would satisfy that criterion; but I’m hoping that I’ll find other, more unexpected examples. I hope that I’ll be able to take some shots that will make a "local" viewer say, "Well, even if that’s not recognizable to someone from another part of the country, or another part of the world, I know that that’s New York!" And there might be some photos where a "non-local" viewer might say, "I had no idea that there was anyplace in New York City that was so interesting/beautiful/ugly/spectacular."

As for the sense of time: I remember wandering around my neighborhood in 2005, photographing various shops, stores, restaurants, and business establishments — and then casually looking at the photos about five years later, and being stunned by how much had changed. Little by little, store by store, day by day, things change … and when you’ve been around as long as I have, it’s even more amazing to go back and look at the photos you took thirty or forty years ago, and ask yourself, "Was it really like that back then? Seriously, did people really wear bell-bottom jeans?"

So, with the expectation that I’ll be looking at these every-block photos five or ten years from now (and maybe you will be, too), I’m going to be doing my best to capture scenes that convey the sense that they were taken in the year 2013 … or at least sometime in the decade of the 2010’s (I have no idea what we’re calling this decade yet). Or maybe they’ll just say to us, "This is what it was like a dozen years after 9-11".

Movie posters are a trivial example of such a time-specific image; I’ve already taken a bunch, and I don’t know if I’ll ultimately decide that they’re worth uploading. Women’s fashion/styles are another obvious example of a time-specific phenomenon; and even though I’m definitely not a fashion expert, I suspected that I’ll be able to look at some images ten years from now and mutter to myself, "Did we really wear shirts like that? Did women really wear those weird skirts that are short in the front, and long in the back? Did everyone in New York have a tattoo?"

Another example: I’m fascinated by the interactions that people have with their cellphones out on the street. It seems that everyone has one, which certainly wasn’t true a decade ago; and it seems that everyone walks down the street with their eyes and their entire conscious attention riveted on this little box-like gadget, utterly oblivious about anything else that might be going on (among other things, that makes it very easy for me to photograph them without their even noticing, particularly if they’ve also got earphones so they can listen to music or carry on a phone conversation). But I can’t help wondering whether this kind of social behavior will seem bizarre a decade from now … especially if our cellphones have become so miniaturized that they’re incorporated into the glasses we wear, or implanted directly into our eyeballs.

If you have any suggestions about places that I should definitely visit to get some good photos, or if you’d like me to photograph you in your little corner of New York City, please let me know. You can send me a Flickr-mail message, or you can email me directly at ed-at-yourdon-dot-com

Stay tuned as the photo-walk continues, block by block …

Liberty Bell avalanche chutes
liberty bell

Image by WSDOT
Looking back towards Liberty Bell 1 from the top of Liberty Bell 2. Note the sign. Liberty Bell 1 is about half the width as last year, with not a lot of visible snow available to come down.

8076009146_003d9d3bbc

2012 09 23 – 0530 – Philly – Market East

A few nice philadelphia transportation images I found:

2012 09 23 – 0530 – Philly – Market East
philadelphia transportation

Image by thisisbossi

DSC_5501
philadelphia transportation

Image by banter

Image from page 381 of “The Street railway journal” (1884)
philadelphia transportation

Image by Internet Archive Book Images
Identifier: streetrailwayjo151899newy
Title: The Street railway journal
Year: 1884 (1880s)
Authors:
Subjects: Street-railroads Electric railroads Transportation
Publisher: New York : McGraw Pub. Co.
Contributing Library: Smithsonian Libraries
Digitizing Sponsor: Smithsonian Libraries

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VIEW ALONG LINE and fifteen minutes. There is no direct steam railroadconnection between the terminals of the electric road, andit is thought that considerable through business can be se-cured, as well as a considerable excursion business in thesummer. To encourage the regular passenger business,

Text Appearing After Image:
DOUBLE TRUCK CAR especially on rainy and cold days, the company will buildwaiting stations at regular points along the line, and theywill be lighted and heated by electricity. The officers of the Philadelphia & West Chester Trac-tion Company are: President, A. Merritt Taylor; secre-tary, C. Russell Hinchman; treasurer, Nathan Sellers;electrical engineer, Joseph W. Silliman; superintendent, J.H. Gibson. The general contractors were Pepper & Register.■ For making inspection and running repairs such as should be made in car-houses, it is a safe rule to have one man to seven cars. From paper at the Boston Convention, 1898. June, 1899. STREET RAILWAY JOURNAL. 357 An Interesting; Cross Country Electric Road The Dayton & Western Traction Company, of Dayton,Ohio, in which some of the principal stockholders of theCity Railway Company, of Dayton, are interested, is op-erating an important electric railway extending from Day-

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10334643706_556aa5ec8e

Nice Philadelphia Transportation photos

A few nice philadelphia transportation images I found:

Amtrak – Train Schedule – Philadelphia 30th Street Station, October, 2013
philadelphia transportation

Image by Jeffrey

Image from page 648 of “The Street railway journal” (1884)
philadelphia transportation

Image by Internet Archive Book Images
Identifier: streetrailwayjo251905newy
Title: The Street railway journal
Year: 1884 (1880s)
Authors:
Subjects: Street-railroads Electric railroads Transportation
Publisher: New York : McGraw Pub. Co.
Contributing Library: Smithsonian Libraries
Digitizing Sponsor: Smithsonian Libraries

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A Representative Installation of The Latest Type Westinghouse Vertical, Single-Acting Gas Engines. Superior To All Others in points of Reliability, Durability, Regulation and Economy The Westinghouse Machine Co. Works: East Pittsburg, Pa. c New York, 10 Bridge St. Chicago, 171 La Salle St. Pittsburg, Westinghouse Bldg.s , nf«/*Aa J Boston, 131 State. St. Detroit, Union Trust Bldg. Philadelphia. Stephen Qirard Bldg. saies unices^ Charlotte, N. C , South Try on St Atlanta, Equitable Bldg. v. San Francisco: Hunt, Mirk & Co.. 614 mission St. Designers and Builders of Steam Engines, Gas Engines, Steam Turbines, Roney Mechanical Stokers STREET RAILWAY JOURNAL 41 Westinghouse Air Brakes for Electric Railway Service

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Metropolitan Elevated R.R. (West Side, Chicago) are equipping: theirrolling stock with the New Westinghouse Automatic Brake. The New Westinghouse Automatic Air Brake Combines the advantages of the old straightair, and the old automatic brakes, without theirdisadvantages, It embodies : Graduated Release. Quick Service Application. Ease and Accuracy of Graduation. Accurate Stops, thus Saving Time and Air.Absence of Shock. For further particulars address Westinghouse Traction Brake Co. 26 Cortlandt St., New York Straight, Automatic and Combined Air Brakes.Motor=Driven Air Compressors. Apparatus Hanufactured by The Westinghouse Air Brake Co. STREET RAILWAY JOURNAL. Baldwin Locomotive Works M. C. B. Type Motor Truck For High Speed Service

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7117 turning into Frankford Transp. Center
philadelphia transportation

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Bevin Branlandingham

A few nice philadelphia travel guide images I found:

Bevin Branlandingham
philadelphia travel guide

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Black and white headshot for Bevin Branlandingham

Bevin is a flamboyant femmecee, queer high femme, drag king, burlesque and comedy performer. She hosts and produces FemmeCast: The Queer Fat Femme’s Guide to Life. She was a founding member and producer of the Royal Renegades of Philadelphia, a drag troupe that performed throughout the US and Canada. She also co-produces and hosts gayety.wordpress.com/, Fat and Queer NYC and Volunteer coordinator for Jersey City Pride. Her interests include travel, knitting, cupcakes, music, her shih tzu and community building. She blogs at The Femme’s Guide to Absolutely Everything and performs throughout North America.

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Image from page 991 of “Automotive industries” (1899)
philadelphia travel guide

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Identifier: automotiveindust44phil
Title: Automotive industries
Year: 1899 (1890s)
Authors:
Subjects: Automobiles Aeronautics
Publisher: Philadelphia [etc.] Chilton [etc.]
Contributing Library: Engineering – University of Toronto
Digitizing Sponsor: University of Toronto

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which arealso able to travel on good roads at the speed of con-ventional motor trucks. Previous forms of caterpillartracks were usually developed for low-speed agricul-tural purposes, and high speeds were difficult to main-tain, due to the wear and the mechanical losses in thetrack itself. Increased efficiency is attributed to thefabric track illustrated. Running on its wheels, the carcan make about 45 miles per hour. With the tracksapplied, a maximum speed of 37 miles per hour on goodroads has been attained, which, so far as is known, isthe highest speed ever developed by a track-laying typeof vehicle. Each track consists of two rubberized fabric beltswhich are connected together by steel stampings rivetedto the belts, the ends of the stampings being turnedover to the inside so as to form a guide into which thetires fit. Any clogging material which may lodge onthe upper side of the track is forced through the largeopening in the track, which is a feature of this typeof construction.

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In addition to the regular wheels of the car, there areprovided four extra wheels, two on each side, of thesame size as the regular wheels and located betweenthe front and rear regular wheels. These extra wheelsserve as carriers, the track under the regular wheelsbeing normally off the ground. Standard regular 3V2-in.pneumatic tires are used, and after 1300 miles of opera-tion, under conditions which would have damaged thetires of a regular Ford, the tires and fabric track showedno wear. There was a nominal amount of wear on thereplaceable steel cross links. For steering, a pair of separate brakes is providedwhich permit of locking the driving wheel on either side.The regular gear ratios of the Ford are too high forthis vehicle to operate satisfactorily in soft ground, deepmud, wet marsh, etc., and a commercial auxiliary trans-mission, which doubles the gear reduction, is introducedin the drive shaft directly in front of the rear axlehousing. For operation on improved roads, the regul

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