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Cool Liberty Bell images

Some cool liberty bell images:

You would think there is only one restaurant in NYC with a name like this one
liberty bell
Image by Ed Yourdon
This photo was taken on 9th Ave, between 22nd and 23rd Street.

In fact, you probably wouldn’t even think it was a restaurant. A shop? Yeah, maybe — after all, all of us shop for meatballs every once in a while, right?

But a restaurant? Well, okay, NYC is probably big enough to support one such restaurant … and I thought I was photographing something pretty unique when I took this picture. But then, exactly a month after I took this photo, I happened to be trudging along one of the avenues on the Upper East Side, still looking for photos that truly say "this is New York" … and, to my amazement, I saw another Meatball Shop!

Egad! How could this be? Google to the rescue! As soon as I got home, I googled the phrase (yeah, I know that I have a very small life — but admit it: you would have done the same thing!).

And I found that there is not just one, and not just two, Meatball Shops in NYC. There are five such establishments: one in the West Village, one in Chelsea, one in the Upper East Side, one in the Lower East Side, and one in Williamsburgh, Brooklyn. (Sorry, Queens, Bronx, and Staten Island: you aren’t worthy of such an honor).

But where, I hear you asking, where exactly are they located? I thought you would never ask … but here is the URL that will provide the details:

themeatballshop.com/locations/

A couple of additional details for you to ponder: note that patrons of this fine establishment are apparently known as "ballers." And note that the shop was given an "A" rating by the NYC restaurant inspectors; so you can be reasonably confident that they serve nothing but the very best meatballs.

***************

This set of photos is based on a very simple concept: walk every block of Manhattan with a camera, and see what happens. To avoid missing anything, walk both sides of the street.

That’s all there is to it …

Of course, if you wanted to be more ambitious, you could also walk the streets of Brooklyn, Queens, Staten Island, and the Bronx. But that’s more than I’m willing to commit to at this point, and I’ll leave the remaining boroughs of New York City to other, more adventurous photographers.

Oh, actually, there’s one more small detail: leave the photos alone for a month — unedited, untouched, and unviewed. By the time I actually focus on the first of these "every-block" photos, I will have taken more than 8,000 images on the nearby streets of the Upper West Side — plus another several thousand in Rome, Coney Island, and the various spots in NYC where I traditionally take photos. So I don’t expect to be emotionally attached to any of the "every-block" photos, and hope that I’ll be able to make an objective selection of the ones worth looking at.

As for the criteria that I’ve used to select the small subset of every-block photos that get uploaded to Flickr: there are three. First, I’ll upload any photo that I think is "great," and where I hope the reaction of my Flickr-friends will be, "I have no idea when or where that photo was taken, but it’s really a terrific picture!"

A second criterion has to do with place, and the third involves time. I’m hoping that I’ll take some photos that clearly say, "This is New York!" to anyone who looks at it. Obviously, certain landscape icons like the Empire State Building or the Statue of Liberty would satisfy that criterion; but I’m hoping that I’ll find other, more unexpected examples. I hope that I’ll be able to take some shots that will make a "local" viewer say, "Well, even if that’s not recognizable to someone from another part of the country, or another part of the world, I know that that’s New York!" And there might be some photos where a "non-local" viewer might say, "I had no idea that there was anyplace in New York City that was so interesting/beautiful/ugly/spectacular."

As for the sense of time: I remember wandering around my neighborhood in 2005, photographing various shops, stores, restaurants, and business establishments — and then casually looking at the photos about five years later, and being stunned by how much had changed. Little by little, store by store, day by day, things change … and when you’ve been around as long as I have, it’s even more amazing to go back and look at the photos you took thirty or forty years ago, and ask yourself, "Was it really like that back then? Seriously, did people really wear bell-bottom jeans?"

So, with the expectation that I’ll be looking at these every-block photos five or ten years from now (and maybe you will be, too), I’m going to be doing my best to capture scenes that convey the sense that they were taken in the year 2013 … or at least sometime in the decade of the 2010’s (I have no idea what we’re calling this decade yet). Or maybe they’ll just say to us, "This is what it was like a dozen years after 9-11".

Movie posters are a trivial example of such a time-specific image; I’ve already taken a bunch, and I don’t know if I’ll ultimately decide that they’re worth uploading. Women’s fashion/styles are another obvious example of a time-specific phenomenon; and even though I’m definitely not a fashion expert, I suspected that I’ll be able to look at some images ten years from now and mutter to myself, "Did we really wear shirts like that? Did women really wear those weird skirts that are short in the front, and long in the back? Did everyone in New York have a tattoo?"

Another example: I’m fascinated by the interactions that people have with their cellphones out on the street. It seems that everyone has one, which certainly wasn’t true a decade ago; and it seems that everyone walks down the street with their eyes and their entire conscious attention riveted on this little box-like gadget, utterly oblivious about anything else that might be going on (among other things, that makes it very easy for me to photograph them without their even noticing, particularly if they’ve also got earphones so they can listen to music or carry on a phone conversation). But I can’t help wondering whether this kind of social behavior will seem bizarre a decade from now … especially if our cellphones have become so miniaturized that they’re incorporated into the glasses we wear, or implanted directly into our eyeballs.

Oh, one last thing: I’ve created a customized Google Map to show the precise details of each day’s photo-walk. I’ll be updating it each day, and the most recent part of my every-block journey will be marked in red, to differentiate it from all of the older segments of the journey, which will be shown in blue. You can see the map, and peek at it each day to see where I’ve been, by clicking on this link

URL link to Ed’s every-block progress through Manhattan

If you have any suggestions about places that I should definitely visit to get some good photos, or if you’d like me to photograph you in your little corner of New York City, please let me know. You can send me a Flickr-mail message, or you can email me directly at ed-at-yourdon-dot-com

Stay tuned as the photo-walk continues, block by block …

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Image taken from page 22 of ‘England Picturesque and Descriptive … With … illustrations’

Some cool philadelphia hotels images:

Image taken from page 22 of ‘England Picturesque and Descriptive … With … illustrations’
philadelphia hotels
Image by The British Library
Image taken from:

Title: "England Picturesque and Descriptive … With … illustrations"
Author: COOK, Joel.
Shelfmark: "British Library HMNTS 10348.h.5."
Page: 22
Place of Publishing: Philadelphia
Date of Publishing: 1882
Publisher: Porter & Coates
Issuance: monographic
Identifier: 000772834

Explore:
Find this item in the British Library catalogue, ‘Explore’.
Open the page in the British Library’s itemViewer (page image 22)
Download the PDF for this book Image found on book scan 22 (NB not a pagenumber)Download the OCR-derived text for this volume: (plain text) or (json)

Click here to see all the illustrations in this book and click here to browse other illustrations published in books in the same year.

Order a higher quality version from here.

View from Hotel Room
philadelphia hotels
Image by when i was a bird

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Image from page 399 of “Rambles in the path of the steam-horse. An off-hand olla podrida, embracing a general historical and descriptive view of the scenery, agricultural and mineral resources, and prominent features of the travelled route from Baltimore

A few nice philadelphia travel company images I found:

Image from page 399 of “Rambles in the path of the steam-horse. An off-hand olla podrida, embracing a general historical and descriptive view of the scenery, agricultural and mineral resources, and prominent features of the travelled route from Baltimore
philadelphia travel company
Image by Internet Archive Book Images
Identifier: ramblesinpathofs00bowe
Title: Rambles in the path of the steam-horse. An off-hand olla podrida, embracing a general historical and descriptive view of the scenery, agricultural and mineral resources, and prominent features of the travelled route from Baltimore to Harper’s Ferry, Cumberland, Wheeling, Cincinnati, and Louisville
Year: 1855 (1850s)
Authors: Bowen, Eli, b. 1824
Subjects: Baltimore and Ohio Railroad Company
Publisher: Philadelphia, W. Bromwell and W. W. Smith Baltimore, S. B. Hickcox, agent
Contributing Library: West Virginia University Libraries
Digitizing Sponsor: Lyrasis Members and Sloan Foundation

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Text Appearing Before Image:
r thebuilding and repair of steamboats, is now being erected on the oppositeside of the Scioto. The town contains numerous iron and other manufac-tories; and is in the vicinity of large beds of iron and coal. The present 882 KAMBLES IN THE PATH OF THE STEAM HOESE. Maysville. population is about five thousand. The Scioto river is about two hundredmiles to its source, but is not navigable with steam farther than Chilli-cothe, forty miles from Portsmouth, and thus far only with small boats.Chillicothe was laid out into a town in 1796, and subsequently becamethe capital of the State. Columbus, however, is now the seat of govern-ment. It is situated in the heart of the richest agricultural region of theState, and does an extensive trade in flour, pork-packing, &c. Presentpopulation nearly seven thousand. Columbus, the capital of the State, issituated fifty miles further up the Scioto, being ninety miles distant fromPortsmouth. It has a population of over seventeen thousand, and is con-

Text Appearing After Image:
Maysville. nected by railway and canal, with every section of the United States.Besides the immediate capital buildings, it contains a State LunaticHospital, an Asylum for the Blind, one for the Deaf and Dumb, and theOhio Penitentiary. Forty years ago the ground upon which this beautfulcity now stands, was a perfect wilderness, whose solitudes had not yetbeen broken by the march of civilisation. Maysville, the county seat of Massu, is one of the oldest and hand-somest cities in Kentucky. The situation, like that of Portsmouth, iselevated, commanding and picturesque ;—a range of bold and verdanthighlands, rising immediately behind it, and rendering its appearancefrom the boats passing up and down the river, extremely attractive.Thus confined to a narrow belt, between the river and the surroundinghills, the town is closely and compactly built, and gives every indicationof prosperity and industry. It is the entrepot of goods and produce im- RAMBLES m THE PATH OF THE STEAM HOESE. 883 Ci

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Image from page 15 of “The 1910 trip of the H.M.M.B.A. to California and the Pacific coast” (1911)
philadelphia travel company
Image by Internet Archive Book Images
Identifier: 1910tripofhmmbat00jame
Title: The 1910 trip of the H.M.M.B.A. to California and the Pacific coast
Year: 1911 (1910s)
Authors: James, George Wharton, 1858-1923
Subjects: Hotel Men’s Mutual Benefit Association Hotels
Publisher: San Francisco, Press of Bolte & Braden company
Contributing Library: The Library of Congress
Digitizing Sponsor: Sloan Foundation

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Text Appearing Before Image:
. Each road traversedassigned a passenger agent to accompany the party until he was succeededby the official representative of the next railway, the roads over which theXew York M. M. M. 1!. A. special traveled to Los .Angeles and San l-ran-ciseo being as follows: Xew York to ^^a<llin<ton. Central R. R. of Xew 10 THE 1010 TRIP ()F THE H. M. M. W. A. Jersey, Philadelphia «Sc Reading, and Baltimore & Ohio. Washington toXew Orleans, Southern R. R., X. & W. R. R.. A. G. S. R. R.. and O. & C.Route. Xew Orleans to San Francisco to Denver, Southern Pacific R. R.Chicago to Xew York, Lake Shore and Xew York Central. In the Crescent City Arriving at the Terminal Station in Xew Orleans, the party was metbv a committee of local hotelmcn and others, headed hv Mr. Theodore

Text Appearing After Image:
Tlie Original Six nt the New Yorl^ Delegation, who visited Californiawith the H. M. .M. B. A. in 18 6. Reading from left to right: Charles F.I^arzalere, Mrs. Wood, John Burke, E. M. Tiernev, Mrs. Tiernev, Mr.Wood. Grunewald. of the fine hostelry of that name, and including Russell Blakely.St. Charles Hotel, Mrs. Blakely and Miss Blakely; Justin Denechaud,Denechaud Hotel; Mr. and Mrs. L. A. Denechaud and Miss Juanita Dene-chaud ; Senator Voegtle, Cosmopolitan Hotel; Zilrs. oegtle; A. V. Mon-teleone and J. D. Kennedy, Monteleone Hotel; Councilman and Mrs.OConnor, Mrs. R. Miller, Charles A. Hartwell, Hart D. Xewman, GeorgeU. Dunbar, A. A. Aschaffenberg, A. J. Gelpi, T. Tranchina, CouncilmanJohn Frawley, Councilman Thomas Cunningham and Mr. Mayer. TO CALIFORNIA AND THE PACIFIC COAST 11 At the Filtration Plant Those who joined the ]iarty at the filtration plant were City AttorneyI. I). Moore and Miss Moore, and Superintendent Earl, of the Water andSewerai^e Board. Mr. Earl personally cond

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Image from page 196 of “Summer excursion routes and rates. Delaware, Lackawanna and western railroad company. 1893 ..” (1893)
philadelphia travel company
Image by Internet Archive Book Images
Identifier: summerexcursionr00delaw
Title: Summer excursion routes and rates. Delaware, Lackawanna and western railroad company. 1893 ..
Year: 1893 (1890s)
Authors: Delaware, Lackawanna and western railroad company. [from old catalog] Johnson, William Henry, [from old catalog] comp
Subjects:
Publisher: [New York, Printed by Livingston Middleditch co.
Contributing Library: The Library of Congress
Digitizing Sponsor: Sloan Foundation

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Text Appearing Before Image:
Consider you travel by the luxurious steamers of the CLYDE LINE, The only line of Steamships between New York and Jacksonville, Fla., without change. Affording a delightful sail among the Sea Islands along the Southern Coast, calling at Charleston, S. C. Sailing from Tier 29, East River, New York, MONDA YS, WEDNESDA YS and FRIDA YS at 3 P. M. Tables are supplied with the best the Northern and Southern Markets afford. THE CLYDE SHIPS are of modern construction, and provided with every appliancefor safety, comfort and speed. M. H. Clyde, A. T. M. Theo. G. Eger, T. M. A. J. Cole, Passr Agent. W. P. CLYDE & CO., GeneraJ Agents, 5 Bowling Green, New York. 12 S. Delaware Ave., Philadelphia, Pa. /vANS!QN HeaSE, WASHINGTON STREET, : MORRISTOWN, N. J.

Text Appearing After Image:
Situated in central part of City. The only first-class hotel in Northern New Jersey. Newly furnished throughout all the modern improvements. L. D. GUERIN, Proprietor.

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Nice Society Hill photos

A few nice society hill images I found:

Tree lined street in Society Hill
society hill
Image by ConspiracyofHappiness

Tree lined street in Society Hill
society hill
Image by ConspiracyofHappiness

24a Society Hill Historic District – NRHD-71000065 (E)
society hill
Image by Kansas Sebastian
National Register Historic District – NRHD-71000065
__________

Society Hill Historic District
Locust St, between 5th & 6th Streets

Society Hill is a neighborhood in the Center City section of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, United States. The neighborhood, loosely defined as bounded by Walnut, Lombard, Front and 7th Streets, contains the largest concentration of original 18th- and early 19th-century architecture of any place in the United States. Society Hill is noted as a charming district with cobblestone streets bordered by brick rowhouses in Federal and Georgian style.

The district is named after the 18th century Free Society of Traders, which had its offices at Front Street on the hill above Dock Creek. Located close to both the Delaware River and Philadelphia’s civic buildings, including the Independence Hall, the neighborhood soon became one of the city’s most populous areas.

Several market halls, taverns and churches were built alongside brick houses of Philadelphia’s affluent citizens.

Wikipedia: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Society_Hill_Historic_District_(Philadelphia,_Pennsylvania)

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Image from page 245 of “Arctic explorations: the second Grinnell expedition in search of Sir John Franklin, 1853, ’54, ’55” (1856)

A few nice philadelphia traffic images I found:

Image from page 245 of “Arctic explorations: the second Grinnell expedition in search of Sir John Franklin, 1853, ’54, ’55” (1856)
philadelphia traffic
Image by Internet Archive Book Images
Identifier: arcticexploratio01kane
Title: Arctic explorations: the second Grinnell expedition in search of Sir John Franklin, 1853, ’54, ’55
Year: 1856 (1850s)
Authors: Kane, Elisha Kent, 1820-1857
Subjects: Grinnell Expedition 1853-1855)
Publisher: Philadelphia, Childs & Peterson [etc., etc.]
Contributing Library: University Library, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Digitizing Sponsor: University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

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Text Appearing Before Image:
hATlVE SLEDGE, (KOOMETIK,>—CELLULAR BONE OF WHALE. ments of porous bone, admirably knit together bythongs of hide; the runners, which glistened like bur-nished steel, were of highly-polished ivory, obtainedfrom the tusks of the walrus. The only arms they carried were knives, concealedin their boots; but their lances, which were lashed tothe sledges, were quite a formidable weapon. Thestaff was of the horn of the narwhal, or else of thethigh-bones of the bear, two lashed together, or some-times the mirabilis of the walrus, three or four of them 20G THEIR EQUIPMENT. united. This last was a favorite material also for thecross-bars of their sledges. They had no wood. Asingle rusty hoop from a current-drifted cask mighthave furnished all the knives of the party; but the

Text Appearing After Image:
HOOP-IRON KNIFE, (S E V 1 K ) fleam-shaped tips of their lances were of unmistakablesteel, and were riveted to the tapering bony pointwith no mean skill. I learned afterward that themetal was obtained in traffic from the more southerntribes.

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Image from page 326 of “History of the Corn Exchange Regiment, 118th Pennsylvania Volunteers, from their first engagement at Antietam to Appomattox. To which is added a record of its organization and a complete roster. Fully illustrated with maps, portrai
philadelphia traffic
Image by Internet Archive Book Images
Identifier: historyofcornexc00unit
Title: History of the Corn Exchange Regiment, 118th Pennsylvania Volunteers, from their first engagement at Antietam to Appomattox. To which is added a record of its organization and a complete roster. Fully illustrated with maps, portraits, and over one hundred illustrations
Year: 1888 (1880s)
Authors: United States. Army. Pennsylvania Infantry Regiment, 118th (1862-1865) Smith, John L., b. 1846
Subjects: United States. Army. Pennsylvania Infantry Regiment, 118th (1862-1865) United States — History Civil War, 1861-1865 Regimental histories
Publisher: Philadelphia, Pa., J. L. Smith
Contributing Library: New York Public Library
Digitizing Sponsor: MSN

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Text Appearing Before Image:
ject of the war. Though trulyloyal Adams county Pennsylvanians, they had heard but little,and knew nothing except as the attendant scenes of the latebattle brought them to a realizing sense of its terrors. Smith,in the course of the conversation, pushing and inquisitive, andhaving noticed how the male sex was conspicuously absent,graciously turned to the elderly one of the four and, assumingthat she was the mother of the other three, in a tone of condo-lence remarked, By the way, madam, I assume you are awidow, and with all these cares upon you in these troubloustimes your task is by no means a light one. It was too muchfor them. Hitherto controlled solely by mercenary motives,and forgetful of their loss, in a traffic which yielded such tre-mendous profits, the interrogation revived the remembrance ofa dear and absent father, and, all bursting into tears, they man-aged to stammer out an explanation. When the head of the.•enemys column had appeared in that vicinity a few days before,

Text Appearing After Image:
CoKP. John L. Smith, NEW YORK C LIBRARY, ASTOR, LENOX ANDTILDEN FOUNDATIONS. — 277 — the good man, husband .uid father tliat he was, prompted whollyby a motive to save his goods and chattels from destruction,spoliation and seizure, announced himself as heartily in sym-pathy with the Confederate cause, and ready to serve it in anycapacity for which he might be fitted. Good for you, myman, said the general officer whom he made his confidant,and promptly equipping him with cartridge-box and rifle, heforced him into the ranks, and that was the last the)- had seenor heard of him. They would not be comforted nor cease theirweeping until the appearance of the shekels again consoled theirmisfortune, and the bargain and the interview closed cheerfullywhen the goose was boiled, the bread done, and all the articlespaid for. Whether the old man ever returned, and if so, in whatcondition, was never subsequently ascertained. Smith returned to the camp in the waning of the afternoonand, proud as

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4270233738_d628033ee6

Nice Independence Hall photos

Check out these independence hall images:

Espada Mission
independence hall
Image by Frank Jaquier
This is the San Francisco de la Esapda mission chapel in San Antonio, Texas. The mission was established in 1731 and was used by James Bowie, William Travis and the Texas army as a stronghold against the Mexicans during Texas’ struggle for independence. Best viewed large.