Tag Archives: 1921

Image from page 9 of “Modern travel, a record of exploration, travel” (1921)

Some cool philadelphia travel guide images:

Image from page 9 of “Modern travel, a record of exploration, travel” (1921)
philadelphia travel guide
Image by Internet Archive Book Images
Identifier: moderntravelreco00davi
Title: Modern travel, a record of exploration, travel
Year: 1921 (1920s)
Authors: Davidson, Norman James. [from old catalog]
Subjects: Voyages and travels
Publisher: Philadelphia, J. B. Lippincott company London, Seeley, Service & co., ltd.
Contributing Library: The Library of Congress
Digitizing Sponsor: The Library of Congress

View Book Page: Book Viewer
About This Book: Catalog Entry
View All Images: All Images From Book

Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book.

Text Appearing Before Image:
Member of the Scottish Nat-ional Antarctic Expedition 1902-04 ;Medalist, R.S.G.S ; Cuthbert PeekGrant, R.G.S. Many Illustrations&> 3 Maps. Demy 8vo. 255. net. Second Edition. Unexplored New Guinea. A Record of the Travels, Adventurescsr Experiences of a Resident Magi-strate amongst the Head-HuntingSavages Ss Cannibals of the Unex-plored Interior of New Guinea. ByWilfred N. Beavek, with an In-troduction by A. C. HADDON, M.A.,Sc.D., F.R.S. With 24 Illustrations<y 4 Maps. Demy 8vo. 25s. net. Modern Whaling and Bear- Huutingf. A Record of Present-day Whalingwith Up-to-date Appliances in manyParts of the World, and of Bearand Seal Hunting in the ArcticRegions. By W. G. Burn Murdoch,F.R.S.G.S. With 110 Illustrations.Demy Bvo, 21s. net. Third. Edition. Prehistoric Man ^ His Story. A Sketch of the History of Mankindfrom the Earliest Times. By Prof.G.F.Scott Elliot, M. A. (Cantab),B.Sc.(Edin.), F.R.S.E., F.L.S.,F.R.G.S. With 62 Illustrations.IDS. 6d. net. SEELEY, SERVICE is CO. LTD.

Text Appearing After Image:
Captain Haywoods Arab Guide, Mahomed-Ben-Kaid Kaddour This man, to whose skill and endurance he was indebted for safely ciossing some eight hundredmiles of the Sahara wastes, was a typical, hardy desert wanderer. With a cupful of water and ahandful of dates as his daily ration he would bear the scorching heat and suffocating sandstormswithout showing any signs of fatigue. MODERN TRAVEL A RECORD OF EXPLORATION TRAVEL ADVENTURE & SPORT IN ALL PARTS OF THE V^ORLD DURING THE LAST FORTY YEARS DERIVED FROM PERSONAL ACCOUNTS BY THE TRAVELLERS BY NORMAN J. DAVIDSON, B.A. (Oxon.) Author of Romance of the Spanish Main,* Things Seen in Oxford, (£f c, &c. With 5J illustrations l^ lo maps PHILADELPHIAJ. B. LIPPINCOTT COMPANY LONDON : SEELEY, SERVICE & CO., Ltd.I92I k^^ CONTENTS CHAPTER I PAGE Hunting Mighty Game . . . . . . .17 CHAPTER II Hunting Mighty Game—continued . . . . .26 CHAPTER III Hunting Mighty Game—continued . . . . .31 CHAPTER IVThe Ice-bound Shores of Labrador …..moderntravelreco00davi

Note About Images
Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability – coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.

Image from page 160 of “A trip to the Orient; the story of a Mediterranean cruise” (1907)
philadelphia travel guide
Image by Internet Archive Book Images
Identifier: triptoorientstor00jacorich
Title: A trip to the Orient; the story of a Mediterranean cruise
Year: 1907 (1900s)
Authors: Jacob, Robert Urie
Subjects: Middle East — Description and travel
Publisher: Philadelphia, The J. C. Winston co
Contributing Library: University of California Libraries
Digitizing Sponsor: MSN

View Book Page: Book Viewer
About This Book: Catalog Entry
View All Images: All Images From Book

Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book.

Text Appearing Before Image:
th anger. It w^as not the regular hour for prayer in the mosque,but a number of worshipers were devoutly kneelingat different places in the interior, with faces turnedtoward a black stone in the south wall, which indi-cated the direction of the holy city of Mecca. Others,squatting on their bare heels, were reading or recitingin monotonous tones parts of the Koran. There areno benches or chairs in the building; Moslem worshipersdo not require seats while at their devotions. Thegreat dome, over one hundred feet in width, rises ingrandeur one hundred and eighty feet overhead, sup-ported by four huge columns each seventy feet in circum-ference. A circle of windows, forty-four in number,around the dome illumines the golden mosaics whichcover the ceiling. A mosaic picture in the domerepresenting the Almighty, has been obliterated by theTurks and covered with green linen cloth. A versefrom the Koran, in gilt Arabic characters almost thirtyfeet long, is painted on this cloth. The sentence, as

Text Appearing After Image:
THROUGH THE NARROW STREETS OF THE CITY.(149) I50 A TRIP TO THE ORIENT. translated, begins: God is the light of heaven andearth, and ends, God alone sheddeth His light onwhomsoever He pleaseth. If the Moslems believe in the Bible and in God as asupreme being, why did the}^ destroy the mosaic repre-sentation of God on the ceiling? inquired one of thevisitors. The Moslems do believe in the Bible and in oneSupreme God, was the reply, and it was this verybelief that led them to paint out the picture of Godand to destroy all the images and paintings of saints;for Gods command is: Thou shalt not make unto theeany graven image, or any likeness of anything that is inthe heaven above, or that is in the earth beneath,or that is in the water under the earth. Thou shalt notbow down thyself to them. The Moslems, continued the guide, regardMahomet as the Prophet of God, and the Koran aswritten by him under the inspiration of God; but theydo not worship Mahomet or any image or picture ofhim. We pause

Note About Images
Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability – coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.

Image from page 385 of “View of the valley of the Mississippi, or, The emigrant’s and traveller’s guide to the West : containing a general description of that entire country : and also notices of the soil, productions, rivers, and other channels of interc
philadelphia travel guide
Image by Internet Archive Book Images
Identifier: viewofvalleyofmi00bair
Title: View of the valley of the Mississippi, or, The emigrant’s and traveller’s guide to the West : containing a general description of that entire country : and also notices of the soil, productions, rivers, and other channels of intercourse and trade : and likewise of the cities and towns, progress of education, &c. of each state and territory
Year: 1834 (1830s)
Authors: Baird, Robert, 1798-1863
Subjects: Mississippi River Valley United States
Publisher: Philadelphia : H.S. Tanner
Contributing Library: New York Public Library
Digitizing Sponsor: MSN

View Book Page: Book Viewer
About This Book: Catalog Entry
View All Images: All Images From Book

Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book.

Text Appearing Before Image:
enerally con-stitutes every second line of the song. These chorussesare usually an unmeaning string of words, such as Ohio,Ohio, Oh-i-o ; or O hang, boys, hang ; or O stormy,stormy, &;c. When tired with the insipid gabble of thecard-table in the cabin, or disinclined to converse withany one, I have spent hours in listening to the boat songsof these men. In conclusion, I would remark that it is the testimonyof the captains with whom I have conversed, that thetemperance reform is making gradual progress on boardthe steam-boats of the West. On hoard the boat onwhich this chapter loas written^ no ardent spirits aredrunk by either officers or men. Still, much remains tobe done. But I must close this long, but still imperfect, accountof the steam-boats in the Valley of the Mississippi. 34i^ ige anditc. &c. n as I3llers,of theiteredf our )ne of! Val-of the ^7W vhich statevhichy and _,. nn of TILD-^N FOt pass. ——–^ Eng- to it!., asjver,ining)n on)r byhichBuf.nces 73 80 96 105 113

Text Appearing After Image:
HINTS TO EMIGRANTS, ETC. 341^ CHAPTER XXVIII. Hints to Emigrants on the modes of removing to the West.—Stage andSteam-boat Routes.—Expenses of removing, and of travelling, &c. &c. I PROPOSE to give, in this chapter, such information as Iam able, which may be useful to emigrants and travellers,respecting the various modes of going to the Valley of theMississippi, and the expenses which must be encounteredby those who travel, or remove, to that part of ourcountry. There are three general and grand routes, some one ofwhich must be pursued by every one who visits the Val-ley of the Mississippi, from the states which lie east of theAllegheny Mountains:— I. By the Lakes on the north.—This is the route whichemigrants and travellers from New England and the stateof New York will pursue. There are two points whichall of the first named class will aim at, viz.: Albany andBuffalo. The major part of the New York column ofemigration will have only the latter named place to pass. As

Note About Images
Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability – coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.

Image from page 225 of “The First battalion, the story of the 406th telegraph battalion, Signal corps” (1921)

A few nice philadelphia traffic images I found:

Image from page 225 of “The First battalion, the story of the 406th telegraph battalion, Signal corps” (1921)
philadelphia traffic
Image by Internet Archive Book Images
Identifier: firstbattalionst00scha
Title: The First battalion, the story of the 406th telegraph battalion, Signal corps
Year: 1921 (1920s)
Authors: Schauble, Peter Lambert. [from old catalog]
Subjects: United States. Army. Signal corps. 406th telegraph battalion. [from old catalog] World War, 1914-1918
Publisher: Philadelphia
Contributing Library: The Library of Congress
Digitizing Sponsor: Sloan Foundation

View Book Page: Book Viewer
About This Book: Catalog Entry
View All Images: All Images From Book

Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book.

Text Appearing Before Image:
/vfert* flr»>f QrAs #»,.£/>■. Ojfi« ./ fit ^/<f <S/po«/ Cftv/£• – Oct- /f/<5 SIGNAL LINES IN THE ARGONNE 218 THE FIRST BATT J LION The operating crowd at Bonehead had a dull time when not on duty.There was nothing to do on the deserted hillside, and they used up their energyfighting rats, cooties, and fleas. Hannam was one of the operators: The headquarters in this instance were in old French dugoutspenetrating the hill possibly ioo feet, well reinforced with tin ceilingsand walls to keep out the dampness. Air raids and shelling were amatter of indifference to us here; in fact, it was more or less of anamusement to stand at the front door and watch old Jerry drop themin the valley back of us. Well, if the dugouts were intrenched, so were the rats. They

Text Appearing After Image:
1—General Dickman. 2 —Colonel Voris. 3—General Craig.IN FRONT OF BONEHEAD used to do squads right and left by battalions over the tin ceilingcontinuously and as soon as lights were out or it quieted down, theydcome out and run over our faces, chew our hair and eat our clothes,and they were ably assisted by fleas and cooties. The Germans werefighting every inch of ground above us here in the Argonne withtheir machine gun nests. We existed at old Bonehead for about five weeks. Traffic jamswere on the roads for days at a time and for mile after mile. Sosupplies were more or less scarce and we lived on corned beef hashand French biscuits. The seats of our trousers were worn out and Ihad a hole as big as a plate burnt in the back of my coat, but we BONEH EJD 219 didnt care, for the news was good, and on this job we always hadplenty of it. Peterson, another switchboard operator, wrote the following while atBonehead: Time: Sunday afternoon—1 oclock. Place: Cotes de Forimont. Scene: O

Note About Images
Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability – coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.

The Traditional St. Patrick’s Day Traffic Barrel Celebration
philadelphia traffic
Image by kmcgee01

Image from page 148 of “Modern travel, a record of exploration, travel” (1921)

Check out these philadelphia travel company images:

Image from page 148 of “Modern travel, a record of exploration, travel” (1921)
philadelphia travel company
Image by Internet Archive Book Images
Identifier: moderntravelreco00davi
Title: Modern travel, a record of exploration, travel
Year: 1921 (1920s)
Authors: Davidson, Norman James. [from old catalog]
Subjects: Voyages and travels
Publisher: Philadelphia, J. B. Lippincott company London, Seeley, Service & co., ltd.
Contributing Library: The Library of Congress
Digitizing Sponsor: The Library of Congress

View Book Page: Book Viewer
About This Book: Catalog Entry
View All Images: All Images From Book

Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book.

Text Appearing Before Image:
l ? Spear them at once, was the fiendish reply. Forif we did not others would pretend they were ill in orderto avoid carrying their loads. No ! we never leavethem alive on the road. They all know our custom. I see women carrying not only a child on their backs,but, in addition, a tusk of ivory or other burden ontheir heads. What do you do in their case when theybecome too weak to carry child and ivory ? Whocarries the ivory ? She does ! We cannot leave valuable ivory on theroad. We spear the child and make her burden lighter.Ivory first, child afterwards ! Swann could have struck the demon dead at his feet. He was helpless, but it is pleasant to reflect that hewas then looking on the last slave caravan permitted toleave the mainland, for a strong letter of protest toEngland caused pressure to be brought to bear on theSultan of Zanzibar. The party broke camp and had a heart-breakingjourney through the plains of Ugogo, for thorny bushesand rugged country rendered the march not one to be

Text Appearing After Image:
3 J^ 3 3 «, ^ s c s s n !« bfl – rt o ^ .J3 o Z. > o 3 D. i> c 0,22 THE HAUNTS OF SLAVERY 121 forgotten. This locality was inhabited by a powerfuland truculent race of ruffians, the Wagogo, who mademost impudent and extortionate demands as paymentfor the water asked for. They reached the much-dreaded Mgunda-Mkali wilderness, a plateau of abouteight hundred feet high, a most difficult climb rendereddoubly distressing by the absence of water. In thisneighbourhood they discovered the skeletons of theirfour mail-men who had been murdered by robbers, withthe fragments of letters strewn in all directions, but asthere were seven skulls it proved that they had notsuccumbed without making a stiff fight. It had long been Swanns ambition to shoot a bullbuffalo, and when marching through the country of theUnyamwezi he came across the spoor of one on the edgeof a swamp. He was armed with only

Note About Images
Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability – coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.

Image from page 87 of “Modern travel, a record of exploration, travel” (1921)
philadelphia travel company
Image by Internet Archive Book Images
Identifier: moderntravelreco00davi
Title: Modern travel, a record of exploration, travel
Year: 1921 (1920s)
Authors: Davidson, Norman James. [from old catalog]
Subjects: Voyages and travels
Publisher: Philadelphia, J. B. Lippincott company London, Seeley, Service & co., ltd.
Contributing Library: The Library of Congress
Digitizing Sponsor: The Library of Congress

View Book Page: Book Viewer
About This Book: Catalog Entry
View All Images: All Images From Book

Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book.

Text Appearing Before Image:
ell as nets.Fish-traps of wicker-work^ verysimilar to lobster-pots, also areused. In deeper water, where itis clear, they frequently shoot thelarger fish with bow and arrow.Eels and mud-fish are speared.Occasionally they capture a largewater-snake, averaging about ninefeet; the flesh is coarse, but the bulkmakes up for the lack of quality.Alligators are sometimes speared when they areasleep. Another, but dangerous method, is to form aline across a stream while a few others drive the animaldown. As a rule the alligators when disturbed make forthe water, but on one occasion when Grubb was in hiscanoe collecting poles one of them confronted him ashe was about to land. The brute showed fight soGrubb thrust the paddle between his jaw. As he madenothing of this a pole was substituted and rammedwell into his body, of course killing him. Trussed inthis fashion it was towed home, greatly to the amuse-ment of the Indians. Dangers attend the sport offishing; more dangerous than an encounter with

Text Appearing After Image:
Wicker Fish-trap THE PARAGUAYAN CHACO 69 alligators or large water-snakes, because unseen. Thesting-ray fish, for example, lies hidden in the mud ofthe swamps, and especially of the larger streams.When trodden upon by the fisher it retaliates bythrusting its powerful sting, rising as a fin from the back,into his foot, sometimes penetrating from the soleright through the instep. This causes not only intensesuffering, but sometimes results in serious complica-tions, and even death. A less dangerous, but morecommon, foe is a small fish with very sharp teeth,capable of biting through thin wire. It frequentlyattacks the fisher, taking away a piece of his flesh. Poisonous snakes lurk in the tangled vegetation.On one occasion when Grubb was clearing a passagethrough a swamp, and bending down to cut at the rootsof the undergrowth, one of them struck at him, but anIndian standing by dealt it a blow just in time with hisbush-knife. The Indians are adepts at throwing withshort thick sticks, and

Note About Images
Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability – coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.

Image from page 28 of “Modern travel, a record of exploration, travel” (1921)

Some cool philadelphia travel company images:

Image from page 28 of “Modern travel, a record of exploration, travel” (1921)
philadelphia travel company
Image by Internet Archive Book Images
Identifier: moderntravelreco00davi
Title: Modern travel, a record of exploration, travel
Year: 1921 (1920s)
Authors: Davidson, Norman James. [from old catalog]
Subjects: Voyages and travels
Publisher: Philadelphia, J. B. Lippincott company London, Seeley, Service & co., ltd.
Contributing Library: The Library of Congress
Digitizing Sponsor: The Library of Congress

View Book Page: Book Viewer
About This Book: Catalog Entry
View All Images: All Images From Book

Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book.

Text Appearing Before Image:
g below surface betweeneach blast. After it feels refreshed it goes below on itsbusiness for a dive of, say, twenty minutes or half anhour, and may appear any distance from the spot itwent down at. In this last dive it raises the after partof its body with a slow elevation, a sort of sad farewellto the hunter. Certain whales, such as the sperm andnarwhal, and Right whales, lift the whole tail out, butothers, such as the finners, hunted off Shetland, onlyshow the ridge in front of the tail; and seldom showtheir tails or flukes until they are harpooned. The actual firing and hitting a whale any good pistol-shot can do. But manoeuvring the vessel, stalking thewhale, as it were, needs a good deal of experience, andit goes without saying one must have perfect sea-legs ;indeed, that is perhaps the greatest difficulty. It takesa great deal of experience to be unconscious, when thereis a roll on, of any effort to balance oneself, which is,of course, absolutely essential for a successful shot.

Text Appearing After Image:
Sighting the Gun CHAPTER II HUNTING MIGHTY GAME (continued) Off Fiugga, the most northerly point of Britainspossessions, the weather was simply beastly ; in anintensely blue sea, with immense silky rollers, it mighthave been in the North-East Trades. It was just whatwas to be expected ; thirty to forty miles north of theislands you strike sun and clear sky, then go west fiftymiles and you come up against a curtain of rain. They are sloping along half-speed north-easterly overa splendid silky swell, all eyes sweeping the horizon.The boy at the wheel is the first to spot a blow, to whichthe whaler is promptly swung, and immediately after,on the horizon, the faintest possible suggestion of ablow is discovered, a minute cloud hardly enough toswear by, as big as the tip of a childs little finger. Itfades away and they are sure it is the blow of somekind of whale, and the boy rings up the engine-roomand, grinning, shouts down the tube : Nord Capper,full speed ! This to make the stokers lay

Note About Images
Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability – coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.

Image from page 45 of “Modern travel, a record of exploration, travel” (1921)
philadelphia travel company
Image by Internet Archive Book Images
Identifier: moderntravelreco00davi
Title: Modern travel, a record of exploration, travel
Year: 1921 (1920s)
Authors: Davidson, Norman James. [from old catalog]
Subjects: Voyages and travels
Publisher: Philadelphia, J. B. Lippincott company London, Seeley, Service & co., ltd.
Contributing Library: The Library of Congress
Digitizing Sponsor: The Library of Congress

View Book Page: Book Viewer
About This Book: Catalog Entry
View All Images: All Images From Book

Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book.

Text Appearing Before Image:
rooves over their sidessuggest that the parrot-like beak of the cuttle-fish hasmade its mark. The contents of the stomach of manyof the largest whales in the world, Balcenoptera Sihaldi(Blue) and Balcenoptera Musculus (Finner), which arekilled nowadays, consist almost entirely of small shrimps,about one-quarter of the size of the common shrimp. The food of the whale that used to be more common,the Right whale, Balcena Mysticetus, is about the sizeof barleycorns and looks rather like sago with a brownishtint. The whale takes a mouthful of these, plus water,and squeezes the water through the blades of whaleboneround the edge of its mouth, each of which has a fringeof hairs on the inside. These hairs, interwoven, make asurface to the palate like that of a coconut mat, which 36 HUNTING MIGHTY GAME makes a perfect strainer. Then the whale swallows themass of minute crustaceans that is left on its tongueand palate. The tongue is an immense floppy plum-coloured thing like a deflated balloon.

Text Appearing After Image:
A Comparison of Arctic and Antarctic Ice [The information contained in the preceding chaptershas been derived from Mr. W. G. Burn Murdochs book,Modern Whaling, by kind permission of the author.] CHAPTER IV THE ICE-BOUND SHORES OF LABRADOR It was in 1771 that the missionaries of the MoravianChurch went to Labrador. Before that time very littlewas known about the Eskimo people. Vessels seldombraved the stormy waters of Labrador, or, if they did,they ventured but little among the numberless rocksand islands that fringe the mainland. So it came aboutthat the Eskimos were seldom seen ; and the few reportsthat were brought to the civilised world by returningfisher crews described them as a totally savage anduncultured people. They seem to have deserved thename ; for the first men who landed from the missionships were killed. Doctor Huttons first impression of the land was adispiriting one. There was a chilling mist on the water,and through it he could dimly see a dull and sullencoast-line,

Note About Images
Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability – coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.

Image from page 96 of “Modern travel, a record of exploration, travel” (1921)

Check out these philadelphia travel company images:

Image from page 96 of “Modern travel, a record of exploration, travel” (1921)
philadelphia travel company
Image by Internet Archive Book Images
Identifier: moderntravelreco00davi
Title: Modern travel, a record of exploration, travel
Year: 1921 (1920s)
Authors: Davidson, Norman James. [from old catalog]
Subjects: Voyages and travels
Publisher: Philadelphia, J. B. Lippincott company London, Seeley, Service & co., ltd.

View Book Page: Book Viewer
About This Book: Catalog Entry
View All Images: All Images From Book

Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book.

Text Appearing Before Image:
ost primitive loom in the world. Two forked uprights and two horizontalbranches. Upon this crude frame woollen blankets of very even and fine texture arewoven. THE PARAGUAYAN CHACO 73 horse, until the happy idea of getting a boy to sitbehind him and hold him on, solved the difficulty.During this journey they encountered a dust storm,followed by terrific thunder and exceptionally vividlightning. A torrential downpour soon put out theirfire and chilled them to the bone. The rest of thejourney was hard for both man and beast. Often thehorses were tethered over their fetlocks in water.Frequent gullies were crossed where the water coveredGrubbs saddle, and the horses were at times momen-tarily off their feet. On arriving at the larger streamsthey had to make rafts to transport their belongings,and across the smaller they swam with their goods, ininstalments, tied upon their heads. After six daysjourneying under these miserable conditions they wereglad indeed to arrive at Thlagnasinkinmith.

Text Appearing After Image:
A Lengua Pipe CHAPTER VI THE SAVAGE TRIBES OF THE PARAGUAYAN CHACO As years passed by and Grubbs influence over theIndians grew, the work became sufficiently consolidatedto enable him to leave on his first furlough to England.But before leaving it was decided to establish a missionon the West-South-West Chaco, on the borders of theLengua, Suhin, and Toothli tribes. After serious con-sideration an Indian named Poit was authorised to carryout some preparatory movements on the frontier duringGrubbs absence in England. He was at that time amost hopeful and capable adherent, and it was for thisreason he was chosen. Seventeen head of cattle andother goods for barter were given to him, with definiteinstructions that he was to establish himself at a certainplace, make a garden, barter the goods for sheep andgoats, and the cattle also as opportunity offered. Hewas to do what he could to persuade the people togather round as soon as men could be sent out tocommence the work, and to impress on t

Note About Images
Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability – coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.

Image from page 219 of “Modern travel, a record of exploration, travel” (1921)
philadelphia travel company
Image by Internet Archive Book Images
Identifier: moderntravelreco00davi
Title: Modern travel, a record of exploration, travel
Year: 1921 (1920s)
Authors: Davidson, Norman James. [from old catalog]
Subjects: Voyages and travels
Publisher: Philadelphia, J. B. Lippincott company London, Seeley, Service & co., ltd.

View Book Page: Book Viewer
About This Book: Catalog Entry
View All Images: All Images From Book

Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book.

Text Appearing Before Image:
y thousandsquare miles, thus exceeding that of France, Belgiumand Holland all put together. It contains an extensiveelevated region occupying about two-thirds of theisland to the east and north ; and as the watershed ismuch nearer the east than the west of the island, almostall the chief rivers flow, not into the Indian Ocean, butinto the Mozambique Channel. A belt of dense forestruns all along the east side of the island, and is continuedwith many breaks along the western side, and scoresof extinct volcanoes are found in several districts of theinterior. Since 1895, when the island was taken overas a colony by the French, the country has been verymuch opened up, and the exclusiveness against theforeigner broken down. So late as the year 1899 thejourney from Tamatave, the chief port, to Antananarivothe capital, took eight days by road, whereas now ittakes but one by rail. When Dr. Sibree, who is still living, first landed somethirty years ago in Madagascar there were no luxuriousM 177

Text Appearing After Image:
MADAGASCAR : NATURES MUSEUM 179 liners or Messageries Maritimes; he had to make thepassage from Port Louis, the capital of Mauritius, toTamatave by means of a bulloeker. This is a vesselwhich has been condemned for ordinary traffic, but isstill considered good enough to convey from two tothree hundred cattle from Tamatave to Port Louis orReunion. It is hardly necessary to say that a voyageby such means was anything but pleasant. Happilythe passage was a quick one, taking only three days.The harbour of Tamatave is protected by a coral reef,which has openings to the sea both north and south,the latter being the principal entrance ; it is somewhatdifficult of access, and the ribs and framework of wreckedvessels are very frequently seen on the reef. Sometimesmany hours and even days were spent in attempting toenter, but on this occasion the wind had proved un-expectedly favourable, and soon the cable was rattlingthrough the hawse-hole and the vessel swung round ather moorings. At the time

Note About Images
Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability – coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.