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Image from page 59 of “How to make your window pay your rent; being a series of money making designs for window display and store decoration ..” (1899)

A few nice philadelphia attractions images I found:

Image from page 59 of “How to make your window pay your rent; being a series of money making designs for window display and store decoration ..” (1899)
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Identifier: howtomakeyourwin00hanc
Title: How to make your window pay your rent; being a series of money making designs for window display and store decoration ..
Year: 1899 (1890s)
Authors: Hance brothers & White, Philadelphia. [from old catalog]
Subjects: Display of merchandise Show windows
Publisher: Philadelphia, Hance brothers & White
Contributing Library: The Library of Congress
Digitizing Sponsor: The Library of Congress

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a window display, which is after all only asort of living picture, and must needs follow the generalprinciples of artistic habit. Too little care is given, as a rule, to this necessity otmaking everything fit and harmonize. Druggists havebeen known to use totally dissimilar material in theirdisplays. They would base it on Frogs, perhaps, butwould drag in miniature human figures, or brownies, crsome other incongruous material that would have beenmuch better omitted. Our idea is to use Frogs and onlyFrogs. The Frogs we use are so constructed that theycan be adjusted in all the positions of a human figure.If you want human figures, humanize the Frogs by put-ting them in whatever position you wish. The effectwill be infinitely more amusing, and the material iseasier to get and easier to use. The writer ran across a window display upon one oc-casion that looked for all the world like a kaleidoscopewhen viewed from across the street. It was a smeary 58 HOW TO MAKE YOUR WINDOW PAY YOUR RENT

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Display of Mr Geo. J. Haeussler, Manchester, Mich. Hash of gaudy color, and while it attracted by its veryhideousness,its attraction was not the sort which bringsdollars to the druggists till. Vivid color is all very well—valuable in fact, but let it be in good taste. Let onetint predominate. If this be green, get it as brilliantlygreen as you can, but dont introduce a great splotch ofred on one side. Other colors are perfectly admissible,but let them be in small patches, introduced here andthere harmoniously. After the display is complete, askyour wife or daughter to view it from the outside, from acolor standpoint. You can usually use the result as acriterion. A FEW LITTLB THOUGHTS AT RANDOM. If there is a theatre in town, see if you cannot borrowthere one or two small grass mats. You can make themyourself by staining a coir door mat. Of course, usegrass or sod wherever practicable, wherever the displayis of a rustic character which demands it. The idea is tobe as rational as poss

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Image from page 315 of “Decorative textiles; an illustrated book on coverings for furniture, walls and floors, including damasks, brocades and velvets, tapestries, laces, embroideries, chintzes, cretonnes, drapery and furniture trimmings, wall papers, car
philadelphia attractions
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Identifier: decorativetextil1918hunt
Title: Decorative textiles; an illustrated book on coverings for furniture, walls and floors, including damasks, brocades and velvets, tapestries, laces, embroideries, chintzes, cretonnes, drapery and furniture trimmings, wall papers, carpets and rugs, tooled and illuminated leathers
Year: 1918 (1910s)
Authors: Hunter, George Leland, 1867-1927
Subjects: Embroidery Tapestry Textile fabrics Lace and lace making Wallpaper Decoration and ornament
Publisher: Philadelphia and London, J. B. Lippincott company Grand Rapids, The Dean-Hicks company
Contributing Library: Sterling and Francine Clark Art Institute Library
Digitizing Sponsor: Federally funded with LSTA funds through the Massachusetts Board of Library Commissioners

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ed is shown by a letter datedFebruary 26, 1626, from Rubens dunning M. Valaves for money dueon designs of the Story of Constantine. In the inventory made at thedeath of Planche (Planken), these are described as: Twelve smalldesigns painted in oil on wood, from the hand of Peter Paul Rubens,representing the story of Constantine. The designs were wovenagain and again, and there are several examples of each in the FrenchNational collection. Another set for which the Early Gobelins isfamous is the Story of Artemisia, originated to celebrate the widow-hood of Catherine de Medicis, wife of Henri II, but adapted andgiven new borders to comfort Marie de Medicis and Anne dAutriche,wives of Henri IV and Louis XIII, in their similar bereavements. After the death of Francois de la Planche, his son Raphael drewout his interest, and set up a rival establishment in the FaubourgSaint Germain. Twenty years later another low-warp plant withFlemish weavers was established by Foucquet at Maincy, near his

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O (3i-l = PQ >> J 00 ^& N a cS «-§ Ho * i-h 3 GOBELINS, BEAUVAIS, MORTLAKE TAPESTRIES wonderful estate Vaux-le-Vicomte. These three low-warp plants,together with the ancient but smaller high-warp ones of the Triniteand the Louvre, formed the nucleus of the Royal Furniture Factoryof the Crown formally established by royal decree at the Gobelins in1667, with Charles Lebrun, who had previously been the unfortunateFoucquets decorator and painter, as art director. LOUIS XIV AND LEBRUN The organisation of the Gobelins, from 1662 to 1667, owed every-thing to the energetic care and forethought of Louis XIVs greatminister, Colbert. He was the moving spirit behind it all, and he sawthat the sinews of art in the form of money were not lacking. Theworkmen received quarters on the premises, together with the smallgardens that are still one of the attractions tending to reconcile themto small wages. The different shop managers worked each on his ownaccount. The Crown supplied

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Image from page 154 of “Medical diagnosis for the student and practitioner” (1922)
philadelphia attractions
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Identifier: medicaldiagnosi00gree
Title: Medical diagnosis for the student and practitioner
Year: 1922 (1920s)
Authors: Greene, Charles Lyman, 1862-
Subjects: Diagnosis
Publisher: Philadelphia, Blakiston
Contributing Library: The Library of Congress
Digitizing Sponsor: The Library of Congress

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at, the outer walls of which are 3^0 mm-higher than the ruled plateau. * Maurers modification of the Romanowsky. f Often called incorrectly Jolly Bodies. Reported by Howell in iiby Jolly in 1908. The term Howell-Jolly bodies is equally incorrect. ii; in Germany IIII KXAMINATION OK THE BLOOD 129 This, the older type of blood-counter, is still generally used though thenewer counting chambers are much superior. The Red Count.—The blood is drawn into the pipette by suction or capil-lary attraction from the drop obtained by puncture until it reaches the pointmarked 1. The point is then rapidly wiped dry and the diluent quicklydrawn in until it fills the bulb and reaches the mark 101.* While drawing in the diluent the pipette is revolved between the fingerand the thumb to set in motion the mixing bead contained in the bulb andwhen rilled, again thoroughly shaken and revolved for half a minute. Thismixing should be repeated each time before expelling a drop for examination. Or Carl B Drake

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Fig. 38.—Ruling of the Gorgajew-Pappenheim counting chamber. Fig. 39.—Thoma-Zeiss bloodcounter, showing pipette, count-ing chamber and a part of theruled field. One has then a mixture, each drop of which presents a blood dilution of1 :100. Many prefer a 1 : 200 dilution readily obtained by using the mark 0.5as the upper limit for the indrawn blood. The blood rises quickly if thepipette is perfectly clean and may exceed the proper level if not watchedor checked by withdrawing the point and quickly wiping it. If the higherdilution is used any excess is readily blown out or better drawn down bytouching the tip with filter-paper or blotter. The next step consists in expelling the diluent occupying the capillaryportion of the tube, after which a small drop of the mixture in the bulb isplaced upon the central disc (shown in Fig. 39 (B)), the cover-glass is placedin position and the cells given time to settle. The drop should just fill the central plateau without running over into the *

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Image from page 88 of “Two thousand miles on an automobile; being a desultory narrative of a trip through New England, New York, Canada, and the West” (1902)

Check out these philadelphia travel company images:

Image from page 88 of “Two thousand miles on an automobile; being a desultory narrative of a trip through New England, New York, Canada, and the West” (1902)
philadelphia travel company
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Identifier: twothousandmiles00edd
Title: Two thousand miles on an automobile; being a desultory narrative of a trip through New England, New York, Canada, and the West
Year: 1902 (1900s)
Authors: Eddy, Arthur Jerome, 1859-1920
Subjects: Eddy, Arthur Jerome, 1859-1920 Automobile travel
Publisher: Philadelphia, London, J.B. Lippincott company

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s; it is as if apprentice blacksmiths hadspent their idle moments in constructing a machine. The carriage work is hopelessly bad. The build-ing of carriages is a long-established industry, em- 6 82 On an Automobile ploying hundreds of thousands of hands and millionsof capital, and yet in the entire United States thereare scarcely a dozen builders of really fine, substantial,and durable vehicles. Yet every cross-road maker ofautomobiles thinks that if he can only get his motorto go, the carpenter next door can do his woodwork.The result is cheap stock springs, clips, irons, bodies,cushions, tops, etc., are bought and put over themotor. The use of aluminum bodies and more metalwork generally is helping things somewhat; not thataluminum and metal work are necessarily better thanwood, but it prevents the unnatural union of the lightwood bodies, designed for cheap horse-vehicles, witha motor. The best French makers do not build theirbodies, but leave that part to skilled carriage builders.

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r-y CHAPTER SEVEN BUFFALO TO CANANDAIGUA The five hundred and sixtv-odd miles to Buffalo had Troubles bcgtn been covered Avith no trouble that delayed us for morethan an hour, but our troubles were about to begin. The Professor had still a few days to waste frivo-lously, so he said he would ride a little farther,possibly as far as Albany. However, it was notour intention to hurry, but rather take it easily,stopping by the way, as the mood—or our friends—seized us. It rained all the afternoon of Tuesday, about allnight, and was raining steadilv when we turned off 83 give out 84 On an Automobile Main Street into Genesee with Batavia thirty-eightmiles straight away. We fuh}- expected to reach therein time for kmcheon; in fact, word had been sentahead that we would come in, like a circus, abouttwelve, and friends were on the lookout,—it was fouroclock when we reached town. The road is good, gravel nearly every rod, but the (steady rain had softened the surface to the depth of about

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Image from page 297 of “Two thousand miles on an automobile; being a desultory narrative of a trip through New England, New York, Canada, and the West” (1902)
philadelphia travel company
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Identifier: twothousandmiles00edd
Title: Two thousand miles on an automobile; being a desultory narrative of a trip through New England, New York, Canada, and the West
Year: 1902 (1900s)
Authors: Eddy, Arthur Jerome, 1859-1920
Subjects: Eddy, Arthur Jerome, 1859-1920 Automobile travel
Publisher: Philadelphia, London, J.B. Lippincott company

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conspiracy to effect suchrevolution, also conspired to excite classes of workingmen inChicago into sedition, tumult, and riot, and to the use ofdeadly weapons and the taking of human life, and for thepurpose of producing such tumult, riot, use of weapons andtaking of life, advised and encouraged such classes by news-paper articles and speeches to murder the authorities of thecity, and a murder of a policeman resulted from such adviceand encouragement, then defendants are responsible there-for. It is the logical application of this proposition thatwill defeat the propaganda of action. If it beenacted that any man who advocates the commissionof any criminal act, or who afterwards condones thecrime, shall be deemed guilty of an offence equal tothat advocated or condoned and punished accordingly,the propaganda of action in all branches of criminalendeavor will be effectually stifled without the doubt-ful expedient of directing legislation against any par-ticular social or economic theory.

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UP THE HLL. CHAPTER SEVENTEEN NEW YORK TO BUFFALO It was Saturday, the 14th, at nine oclock, when weleft New York for Albany, followmg the route ofthe Endurance Contest. The morning was bright and warm. The roadswere perfect for miles. We passed Kings Bridge,Yonkers, Hastings, and Dobbs Ferry flying. At Tar-rytown we dropped the chain. A link had parted.Pushing the machine under the shade of a tree, ahalf-hour was spent in replacing the chain and rivet-ing in a new link. All the pins showed more or lesswear, and a new chain should have been put on inNew York, but none that would fit was to be had.292 New York to Buffalo 293 We dined at Peekskill, and had a machinist go overthe chain, riveting the heads of the pins so nonewould come out again. Nelson Hill, a mile and a half beyond Peekskill, a cUmbproved all it was said to be,—and more. In the course of the trip we had mounted hills thatwere worse, and hills that were steeper, but only inspots or for short distances; for a steady ste

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Image from page 193 of “Two thousand miles on an automobile; being a desultory narrative of a trip through New England, New York, Canada, and the West” (1902)
philadelphia travel company
Image by Internet Archive Book Images
Identifier: twothousandmiles00edd
Title: Two thousand miles on an automobile; being a desultory narrative of a trip through New England, New York, Canada, and the West
Year: 1902 (1900s)
Authors: Eddy, Arthur Jerome, 1859-1920
Subjects: Eddy, Arthur Jerome, 1859-1920 Automobile travel
Publisher: Philadelphia, London, J.B. Lippincott company

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s own and use auto-mobiles ; the horses will see so many that little noticewill be taken, but the pioneers of the sport will have animenviable time. A good half-days work was required on the machine So»i/-repairsbefore starting again. The tire that had been plugged with rubber bandsweeks before in Indiana was now leaking, the aircreeping through the fabric and oozing out at severalplaces. The leak was not bad, just about enough torequire pumping every day. The extra tire that had been following along wastaken out of the express office and put on. It was atire that had been punctured and repaired at the fac-tory. It looked all right, but as it turned out the repairwas poorly made, and it would have been better toleave on the old tire, inflating it each day. A small needle-valve was worn so that it leaked;that was replaced. A stiffer spring was inserted in theintake-valve so it would not open quite so easily. Anumber of minor things were done, and every nut andbolt tried and tightened.

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THJE A.^^VaDE INN^ CHAPTER FOURTEEN LEXINGTON AND CONCORD Saturday morning-, September 7, at eleven oclock,we left the Touraine for Auburndalc, where wekmched, then to Waltham, and from there due northby what is known as Waltham Street to Lexington,striking- Massachusetts Avenue just opposite the townhall. PaidRevevf Aloug- this liistoric highway rode Paul Revere; at his heels followed the regulars of King George. Tab-lets, stones, and monuments mark every known pointof interest from East Lexington to Concord.188 Lexington and Concord 189 In Boston, at the head of Hull Street, Christ Church,the oldest church in the city, still stands, and bears atablet claiming for its steeple the credit of the signalsfor Paul Revere: but the Old North Church in NorthSquare, near which Revere lived and where he attendedservice, and from the belfry of which the lanterns werereally hung, disappeared in the conflict it initiated. Inthe winter of the siege of Boston the old meeting-house was pulled down

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Extremely Rare Frank Sinatra Mugshot Suite by Assistant to Andy Warhol, Steve Kaufman Now Being Offered From The Dessler Collection As Art For Sale


Beverly Hills, CA (PRWEB) April 24, 2014

A chance to own a piece of Warhol on canvas for under six figures could now be a reality. Dessler Media is selling a set of Frank Sinatra Mugshot paintings to raise money for the Dessler Foundation Against Teen Pregnancy. The suite was done by Andy Warhol assistant Steve Kaufman, who was rumoured to be the one who actually did over 60% of Warhols paintings and prints. The set that once hung on the wall of the saloon on board the mega yacht of the media tycoon Willem Dessler is being sold for $ 20,000 to raise money for Desslers foundation. For more information please contact the Dessler Foundation at 310 498-9303 or by email at foundation(at)desslermedia(dot)com.

On February 12, 2010, the world lost Steve Alan Kaufman, one of the greatest American pop artists and a generous humanitarian. Steve Kaufman, former assistant to Andy Warhol, passed away at the young age of 49. His memory, as well as his paintings, will live on forever. From his warm smile and generous heart, to his ability to tell a great story and his incredible knack of making every day an adventure filled with humor, drama, and laughter – Steve Kaufman was a legend.

Kaufmans paintings have skyrocketed in price since his death. His paintings have found their way into the homes and hearts of so many, capturing the true American pop art experience. Steve Kaufman painted such timeless pieces such as: Coca Cola, Marilyn Monroe, Mozart, Beethoven, Wizard of Oz, Muhammad Ali, his money series, and his paintings of famous singers, actors and icons. His audience is vast and large, and his contribution to society was enormous. Steve Kaufman launched and operated the “Give Kids a Break Fund,” a successful charity which helped inner city kids from troubled homes or straight from jail. Steve Kaufman gave these kids a job and his trust when no one else would, allowing them opportunities that they would have never had. Steve Kaufman lived for forty nine years, and in that time, he lived the life of 10 men. He will be so painfully missed, but his art will live forever. Steve Kaufman’s paintings have been exhibited in many museums including The Andy Warhol Museum of Modern Art in Slovakia; the Reiss-Engelhorn Museum in Mannheim, Germany; The Museum of Contemporary Art in Hot Springs, AR; The Motown Historical Museum in Detroit, MI; the Blues & Legends Hall of Fame Museum in Memphis,TN; The American Sport Art Museum & Archives in Daphne, AL; The Pop Culture Gallery at The World of Coca-Cola in Atlanta, GA; Sala U. Veruda, Palazzo Costanzi in Trieste, Italy; The Palazzo Guiscardo in Pietrasanta, Italy; Museum of Passion in Valladolid, Spain; Marcos Valcarcel Cultural Center in Galicia, Spain and running from November 21, 2013 through May 6, 2014 a grand exhibition in the House of Enzo Ferrari Museum in Modena, Italy. Steve Kaufman’s paintings are also in two presidential libraries.







Being Gay is Okay Coloring Book Novel with Fabulous Gay Sharing Cards by St. Louis Publisher Really Big Coloring Books – Civil Rights – Tolerance – Inclusion


Saint Louis, MO (PRWEB) March 26, 2013

Helping individuals understand another complex topic, Being Gay is Okay from Really Big Coloring Books

Should we stop being so afraid of questioning capitalism and start looking into socialism when it makes sense?

Question by The Gladiator: Should we stop being so afraid of questioning capitalism and start looking into socialism when it makes sense?
Due to the cold war, cheerleading and praising capitalism became obligatory in America. Because we have failed to question the economic system, it has degenerated into this unequal, crisis ridden disaster we have now. Capitalism is the problem,and the joblessness, homelessness, insecurity, and austerity it imposes ae the costs we all bear. Libertarians and conservatives blaming the government or having fantasies of tax cuts solving everything is not an adequate solution. Neither are liberals and progressives calling for increased government spending or 0 interest rates. The problem is much more fundamental and structural in nature. We have the people, the skills, and the technology to produce the goods and services people need for a just society to prosper. we just need to reorganize our productive units efficiently, to go beyond the capitalist economic system that no longer serves our needs.
Europe is going broke because their government pension funds were heavily invested in mortgage backed securities that firms like Goldman Sachs were pushing as AAA credit ratings, not because of “Socialism.” (Even though none of those countries are socialist.)

Best answer:

Answer by The Anti-Socialist
Yeah, you go do that. Try France
Bye

What do you think? Answer below!