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Image from page 8 of “Book of the Royal blue” (1897)

A few nice philadelphia travel company images I found:

Image from page 8 of “Book of the Royal blue” (1897)
philadelphia travel company
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Identifier: bookofroyalblue23balt
Title: Book of the Royal blue
Year: 1897 (1890s)
Authors: Baltimore and Ohio railroad company. [from old catalog]
Subjects: Middle Atlantic States — Description and travel
Publisher: Baltimore
Contributing Library: The Library of Congress
Digitizing Sponsor: Sloan Foundation

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aU Ones entering Wasti– ington in New Union Station attords directconnections to ttie BaHimore & Oliio witli aUSouthern lines witliout transter across tlie city. Baltimore & Ohio trains trom the North,East and West line up under the same rootwith through trains ot the Seaboard Air Line,Atlantic Coast Line, Southern Railway andWashington Southern-Richmond, Fredericks-burg & Potomac RaHways to Richmond, Ashe-ville, Pine Hurst, Savannah, AHanta, Charles-ton, JacksonvUle, St. Augustine, Tampa and aHthe Florida resorts. The winter season in Florida is near athand and tourist rates will soon be in elfect. The route to Southeastern cities via Wash-ington is eminently desirable and tourists areespecially directed to obtain full informationfrom Baltimore & Ohio Ticket Agents. Through Sleeping Cars run between Pitts-burg and Richmond, Va. Through Parlor Cars run between NewYork and Richmond, Va. Secure a Baltimore & Ohio folder toSouthern points. FINEST DAY TRAIN IN AMERICA

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ROYAL BLUE LINE THE ii 99 Royal Limited SPLENDIDAPPOINTMENTS THE best-appointed trainsbetween Washington, Balti-more, Philadelphia and NewYork are those ol the RoyalBlue Line, leaving WashingtonEvery Odd Hour and NewYork Every Even Hourduring the day. €]|A1I trains have Pullman serv-ice, and dining cars serve allmeals. C}|The finest train of the seriesis the Royal Limited, makingthe run in each direction inFIVE HOURS. <|| It is all Pullman, but no extrafare is charged. The cafe-smoking, parlor and observa-tion cars are superb, and anexcellent table dhote dinner isserved. ^ Lighted by electricitythroughout. Electric fans inail cars. = THE = Royal Limited CONVENIENTSCHEDULES NORTHBOUND. Lv. Washington 3.00 pm New Union Station. Ar. Baltimore 3.44 pm Camden Station. Lv. Baltimore 3.48 pm Camden Station. Lv. Baltimore 3.52 pm Mt. Royal Station. Ar. Wilmington 5.17 pm Ar. Philadelphia 5.50 pm 24th and Cliestnut. Ar.NewYork 8.00pm liberty Street. Ar.NewYork 8.10pm 23d Street. SOUTHBOUN

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Image from page 73 of “Book of the Royal blue” (1897)

A few nice philadelphia travel guide images I found:

Image from page 73 of “Book of the Royal blue” (1897)
philadelphia travel guide
Image by Internet Archive Book Images
Identifier: bookofroyalblue23balt
Title: Book of the Royal blue
Year: 1897 (1890s)
Authors: Baltimore and Ohio railroad company. [from old catalog]
Subjects: Middle Atlantic States — Description and travel
Publisher: Baltimore
Contributing Library: The Library of Congress
Digitizing Sponsor: Sloan Foundation

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ALL EXPENSES INCLUDED 1908-9Seven=Day Tours from BOSTON January 22, February 5 and 19, March 19, April 2, 3 (supplementary), 16 and 30, 1909 from NEW YORK January 23, February 6 and 20,March 20, April 3, 17 and 20, 1909 Three=Day Tours .00 from NILW YORK $ 9.00 from PHILADELPHIA $ 8.70 from CHESTER $ 8.25 from WILMINGTON December 28, 1908, January 21, February 11 and 20,March 11 and 25, April 5 and 15, May 6, 1909. Secure illustrated itineraries and Guide to Washington fromanv Baltimore & Ohio ticket agent in above-named cities.

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Taxicab Service New Union Station WASHINGTON, P. C 23d Street Terminal NEW YORK CITY Baltimore & Ohio R. R. TERMINALSTaxameter Tariff The Taxameter measures accurately the distance traveled and thewaiting time, and automatically computes, indicates and records theexact fare for the service rendered. The amount to be paid by the passenger is the sum of the figuresshown by the indicator marked Fare and by the indicator marked Extras. SINGLE TARIFF Distance—All Vehicles Initial charge (which pays for the first one-half mile or fraction thereof)… $ .30Each quarter mile thereafter 10 Waiting Landaulets, each six minutes •— $ -10 Hansom, Coupe, Brougham or Victoria, each ten minutes (only 60 cents an hour) 10 Extras—All Vehicles Trunk ■. ^ ■ ^0 For ordering a cab each mile or fraction thereof from stand or station to point ordered 20 One or Two Passengers Carried at the Above Rates in Washington, and from One to Five Passengers in New York All ferriage and bridge tolls, bo

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Image from page 71 of “Book of the Royal blue” (1897)
philadelphia travel guide
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Identifier: bookofroyalblue01balt
Title: Book of the Royal blue
Year: 1897 (1890s)
Authors: Baltimore and Ohio railroad company. [from old catalog]
Subjects: Middle Atlantic States — Description and travel
Publisher: Baltimore
Contributing Library: The Library of Congress
Digitizing Sponsor: Sloan Foundation

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h and Chestnut. Ar. New York 8.00 pm liberty Street. Ar.cwYork 8.10 pm 23d Street. SOUTHBOUND Lv. New York 3.50 pm 23d Street. Lv. New York 4.00 pm liberty Street. Lv. Philadelphia 6.12 pm 24th and Chestnut. Lv. Wilmington 6.44 pm Ar. Baltimore 8.09 pm Mt. Royal Station. Ar. Baltimore 8.13 pm Camden Station. Lv. Baltimore 8.16 pm Camden Station. Ar. Washington 9.00 pm New Union Station. Royal Blue Line PERSONALLY CONDUCTED TOURS TO WASHINGTON ALL EXPENSES INCLUDED (908-9Seven=Da.y Tours from BOSTON January 22, February 5 and 19, March 19, April 2,3 (supplementary!, 16 and 30, 1909 from NEW YORK January 23, February 6 and 20,March 20, April 3, 17 and 20, 1909 Three=DaLy Tours .00 from NE.W YORK $ 9.00 from PHILADELPHIA $ 8.70 from CHESTE.R $ 8.25 from WILMINGTON December 28, 1908, January 21, February 11 and 20,March 11 and 25, April 5 and 15, May 6, 1909. Secure illustrated itineraries and Guide to Washington fromany Baltimore & Ohio ticket agent in above-named cities.

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Taxicab Service New Union Station WASHINGTON, D. C 23d Street Terminal NEW YORK CITY Baltimore & Ohio R. R. TERMINALS Taxameter Tariff The Taxameter measures accurately the distance traveled and thewaiting time, and automatically computes, indicates and records theexact fare for the service rendered. The amount to be paid by the passenger is the sum of the figuresshown by the indicator marked Fare and by the indicator markedExtras. SINGLE TARIFF Distance—All Vehicles Waiting Landaulets, each six minutes Hansom. Coupe, Brougham or Victoria, each ten Extras—All Vehicles One or Two Passengers Carried at the Above Rates in Wasliington.and Irom One to Five Passengers in New Yorii ferriage and bridge tolls, both going and returning, mupaid by the passenger.

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Image from page 10 of “Smith’s hand-book and guide in Philadelphia : containing a general view of the city, its government, public buildings, educational, literary, ecclesiastical, scientific, and benevolent institutions, places of public amusements, rail
philadelphia travel guide
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Identifier: smithshandbookgu00phil
Title: Smith’s hand-book and guide in Philadelphia : containing a general view of the city, its government, public buildings, educational, literary, ecclesiastical, scientific, and benevolent institutions, places of public amusements, railroads, and routes from, and in the city, hotels, public parks, and cemeteries, and a new map
Year: 1871 (1870s)
Authors:
Subjects:
Publisher: Philadelphia : G. Delp
Contributing Library: The Library of Congress
Digitizing Sponsor: The Library of Congress

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V^t-< <■ C f HALF-A-

Text Appearing After Image:
OF WHEELER &. WILSON LOCKSTITCH 1N0 MACHIN nsrow msr use. Any one desiring to purchase one of these inimitable Machines can beAccommodated by making application to ONE OF OUR TRAVELING SALESMEN;

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Image from page 608 of “The great American book of biography” (1896)

A few nice philadelphia traffic images I found:

Image from page 608 of “The great American book of biography” (1896)
philadelphia traffic
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Identifier: greatamericanboo01mabi
Title: The great American book of biography
Year: 1896 (1890s)
Authors: Mabie, Hamilton Wright, 1846-1916 Garnett, William, 1850- [from old catalog] Thomas, Allen Clapp, 1846- [from old catalog] Ellis, Edward Sylvester, 1840- [from old catalog] Birdsall, William Wilfred. [from old catalog] Johnson, Willis Fletcher, 1857-1931 Willard, Frances E. (Frances Elizabeth), 1839-1898 International publishing company, Philadelphia. [from old catalog]
Subjects:
Publisher: Philadelphia and Chicago, International publishing company
Contributing Library: The Library of Congress
Digitizing Sponsor: Sloan Foundation

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for their lives ; but what shall come by land shall serve, if boyesor girles until thirty years of age, if men or women twelve years and no longer.And before the end of the century a long series of laws so encompassed thenegro with limitations and prohibitions, that he almost ceased to have anycriminal or civil rights and became a mere personal chattel. In some of the Northern colonies slavery seemed to take root as readily BEGINNING OF THE SLA VE TRAFFIC. 605 and to flourish as rapidly as in the South. It was only after a considerable time that social and commercial conditions arose which led to its gradual abandon^ ment. In New York a mild type of negro slavery was introduced by the Dutch- The relation of master and slave seems in the period of the Dutch rule, to have been free from great severity or cruelty. After the seizure of the government by the English, however, the institution was officially recognized and e en encouraged. The slave trade grew in magnitude , and here .Z^^l

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again we find a series of oppres-sive laws forbidding the meet-ing of negroes together, layingdown penalties for concealingslaves, and the like. In theearly years of the eighteenthcentury fears of insurrectionbecame prevalent, and thesefears culminated in 1741 in the episode of the so-called Negro Plot. Very brieflystated, this plot grew out of a succession of fires supposed to have been the workof negro incendiaries. The most astonishing contradictions and self-inculpations 6o6 THE STOR Y OF AMERICAN SLA VER Y. are to be found in the involved mass of testimony taken at tlie different trials.It is certain that the perjury and incoherent accusations of these trials canonly be equaled by those of the alleged witches at Salem, or of the famousPopish plot of Titus Oates. The result is summed up in the bare statementthat in three months one hundred and fifty negroes were imprisoned, ofwhom fourteen were burned at the stake, eighteen hanged, and seventy-onewere transported. Another result w

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Image from page 18 of “The home of the mutineers” (1854)
philadelphia traffic
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Identifier: homeofmutineers00murr
Title: The home of the mutineers
Year: 1854 (1850s)
Authors: Murray, T. B. (Thomas Boyles), 1798-1860
Subjects: Bounty (Ship) Missions
Publisher: Philadelphia, New York [etc.] American Sunday-school union
Contributing Library: School of Theology, Boston University
Digitizing Sponsor: Boston Library Consortium Member Libraries

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He was appointed inAugust, 1787, both commander and purserof the Bounty, which was stored and vic-tualled for eighteen months. Besides thisprovision, he had supplies of portable soup,essence of meat, sour-krout, and driedmalt; to which were added some articlesof iron and steel, trinkets, beads, and look-ing-glasses, for traffic with the natives.The plants (the best he could obtain) hewas to convey to the West Indies, in orderto cultivate them if possible for the sup-port of the slave population—it havingbeen the opinion of Sir Joseph Banks, whohad visited Tahiti with Captain Cook in1769, that the bread-fruit tree might besuccessfully cultivated in those colonies. The bread-fruit grows on a tree which isabout the size of a common oak, and, to-ward the top, divides into large and spread-ing branches. The leaves are of a verydeep green. The fruit springs from twigs,and grows to the size of a young infantshead. It has a thick rind; and before be-coming ripe, it is gathered, and baked in

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The Bread Fruit. p. 10. BREAD-FRUIT. 11 an oven, when the inner part is like thecrumb of wheaten bread, and found to bevery nutritive. Captain William Dampier,who sailed round the world in the year1688, describes the bread-fruit as havingneither seed nor stone in the inside; butall of pure substance like bread. It mustbe eaten new; for if it is kept abovetwenty-four hours, it grows harsh andchoaky; but it is very pleasant before itis too stale. This fruit lasts in season eightmonths of the year, during which the na-tives of Guam eat no other sort of foodof bread kind. I did never, says he, seeof this fruit anywhere but here. Thenatives told us that there is plenty of thisfruit growing on the rest of the LadroneIslands; and I did never hear of it any-where else. Lord Anson corroborates this accountof the bread-fruit, and says that while atTinian it was constantly eaten by his offi-cers and ships company during their twomonths stay, instead of bread; and souniversally preferred, that no

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Image from page 859 of “The Official hotel red book and directory” (1903)

A few nice philadelphia hotels images I found:

Image from page 859 of “The Official hotel red book and directory” (1903)
philadelphia hotels
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Identifier: officialhotelred00amer
Title: The Official hotel red book and directory
Year: 1903 (1900s)
Authors: American Hotel Association of the United States and Canada American Hotel Association
Subjects: Hotels Hotels Resorts Resorts Railroads Railroads Hotels Tourist camps, hostels, etc
Publisher: New York : Official Hotel Red Book and Directory Co.
Contributing Library: Allen County Public Library Genealogy Center
Digitizing Sponsor: Internet Archive

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Murray Hill WE BOUND THIS BOOK Robert Rutter & Son, Inc. BOOK MANUFACTURERS 410-416 East 32d Street : NEW YORK CITY TELEPHONES: 5865, 5866, 5867 FRANKLIN PETTIT & REED DIRECT RECEIVERS OF Butter, Eggs and Cheese Purveyors to Hotels, Restaurants,Steamship Lines and Railroads NOS. 38 & 40 NORTH MOORE STREET, NEW YORK Telephone 8281-8282 Cortlandt John W. Butler, Inc.BUTTER, CHEESE and EGGS Fancy Elgin and Philadelphia Creameries a Specialty216 Washington Street NEW YORK 837 Butter, Cheese and Eggs – Celery Established 1864 NOLLMAN & CO., Inc. WHOLESALE DEALERS BUTTER, CHEESE & EGGS f 2965 )Telephones Worth(2756) 141 Reade StreetNEW YORK CELERY EXCLUSIVELY

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vi*irv*vy HEADQUARTERS For CELERY the year round HOTELS and RESTAURANTS a Specialty Special attention given to standing requirements throughout the year GEORGE F. FISH 410 West 14th Street and 183 Reade St., N. Y. Established 1883 An Advertised Hotel! I saw it in the HOTEL RED BOOK Many others have seen it, too Was it your Hotelor that of your competitor? &18 Charcoal FIRST CLASS HOTELS, Clubs andRestaurants use only CHARCOAL For BROILING Chefs and Connoisseurs admit it is superior to GAS and ELECTRICITY GUESTS should insist that all steaks, chops, game,poultry, ham, bacon, etc., should be broiled with CHARCOAL otherwise they are not getting the full benefit offirst class cooking. THE E. B. NEWMAN CHARCOAL CO. Manufacturers ofLUMP, GRANULATED, PULVERIZED and POULTRY CHARCOAL FOR ALL PURPOSES Triple Burnt Sugar Maple Granulated Filtering Charcoal forManufacturers of Artificial Ice and Distilled Water Plants. Also Granulated Charcqal for Poultry Food, Ice Box Filling,Insulating, and

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Image from page 673 of “The Official hotel red book and directory” (1903)
philadelphia hotels
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Identifier: officialhotelred00amer
Title: The Official hotel red book and directory
Year: 1903 (1900s)
Authors: American Hotel Association of the United States and Canada American Hotel Association
Subjects: Hotels Hotels Resorts Resorts Railroads Railroads Hotels Tourist camps, hostels, etc
Publisher: New York : Official Hotel Red Book and Directory Co.
Contributing Library: Allen County Public Library Genealogy Center
Digitizing Sponsor: Internet Archive

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rard st. Mrs. CharlotteThomas, Prop. GREENS HOTEL. 8th andChestnut sts. (E. P.) to . M. W. Newton. (Seeillustration and advertisementon page 049.) Guys Hotel. 7th near Chestnut.(E. P.) up. Louis Fuciis- LTJGER. HAMILTON COURT. Chestnutand 39th Sts. K. H. That-cher, Mgr. HOTEL BRYSON. 12th andMarket Sts. (E. P.) up.R. M. Bryson, Prop. HOTEL COLONIAL. (A. V. up. E. P. .60 up.) W. P.Kenney. Hotel Colorado. L38 v L5th Bti a. I. up. i:. P. up.)Ben. Brown, Prop. Hotel Irving. Walnut si., between 9th and loth, i A. P. up. E. P. Up.) 0. V.Condon. Prop. HOTEL MAJESTIC. Broad itabove Girard ave. (E. P.),.50 up. J. S. Mead. Prop. J.S. McCaki [HEY, Mgr. HOTEL NORMANDIB. Cheat-But and 36th Bt8. I A. P. .50up. B. P. .60 up.) Qi m BCity Apartmeis i Hoi bi I Jo.,Props. PENNSYLVANIA—Contd 652 NOTE—CAPITALS show first-class houses.R. R. Indicates Railroad Lines; Ry., Railway ; Str.,Steamer ; Sys., System. See Back of Book.Pop. Indicates Population. t Telegraph Office

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•{• Indicates Summer Resorts. Indicates Winter Resorts. § Indicates Family Hotels. X Special Rates. * Money Order Office. Hotel Vendig FILBERT AND 13th ST. PHILADELPHIA Near to Everywhere Midway between Broad Street Station andReading Terminal, opposite City Hall 250 ROOMS 250 BATHS FIREPROOF—The last word inhotel construction Rates per day and upJAS. C. WALSH, Manager PHILADELPHIA—Contd. HOTEL POWELTON, 40th andFilbert Sts. Ciias. Sauebs. HOTEL RODMAN. Brown andBroad sts. (A. P.) .60 up.Tnos. T. HOBNEY.

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Image from page 675 of “The Official hotel red book and directory” (1903)

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Image from page 675 of “The Official hotel red book and directory” (1903)
philadelphia hotels
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Identifier: officialhotelred00amer
Title: The Official hotel red book and directory
Year: 1903 (1900s)
Authors: American Hotel Association of the United States and Canada American Hotel Association
Subjects: Hotels Hotels Resorts Resorts Railroads Railroads Hotels Tourist camps, hostels, etc
Publisher: New York : Official Hotel Red Book and Directory Co.
Contributing Library: Allen County Public Library Genealogy Center
Digitizing Sponsor: Internet Archive

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1524-42 MARKET ST.PHILADELPHIA, PA. Restaurant and Cafe Attached EUROPEAN PLANRates, 75c. to .50 per Day Situated in the heart of the Businessand Shopping District. Opposite Broad St. Station andthree Squares from Reading Terminal. M. BOYLE A. SWEENEY PHILADELPHIA—Contd. THE BARTRAM, 33rd and Chestnut Sts. Mrs. P. P. John, Mgr.THE BELGRAVIA. 1811 Chest nut st. (A. P. . E. P. .) Frederick Gane, Mgr.THE BELLEVTJ E-STRAT FORD. (E. P.) .50 to . Geo. C. Boldt, Prop.THE BLENHEIM. (A. P. .50. E. P. .50.) A. B. Doty, Mgr. THE COVINGTON, 37th aboveChestnut st. (A. P.) .50to .50. R. F. Engle, Mgr. THE GLADSTONE, 11th andPine sts. II. C. HODGSON,Prop. THE LINCOLN. (A. P. .50up. E. P. .50 up.) J. War-ren Friar, Mgr. THE LORRAINE. Broad st.and Fairmount ave. (A. P..50 up. E. P. .50 up.)M. Myers.

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When BUSINESS or PLEASURE callsYou to PHILADELPHIA stop at DERRSWASHINGTON HOTEL 7th, Dauphin, and Germantown Ave. Convenient to all parts of the city. NearestHOTEL to the Textile district. 10 minutes fromNorth Philadelphia Station, P. R.R. 7 minutesfrom Columbia Ave. Station, P. & R. R.R. For the Automobilist, GARAGE attached. Hnle per <1h S2.00 and up PENN SYLVAN I A-Contd 655 NOTE—CAPITALS show first-class houses.R. R. Indicates Railroad Lines; Ry., Railway; Str.,Steamer; Sys., System. See Back of Book.Pop. Indicates Population. t Telegraph Office

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Palomar Philadelphia Hallway
philadelphia hotels
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Image from page 8 of “Philadelphia and its environs, and the railroad scenery of Pennsylvania” (1875)
philadelphia hotels
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Identifier: philadelphiaitse00jb
Title: Philadelphia and its environs, and the railroad scenery of Pennsylvania
Year: 1875 (1870s)
Authors: J.B. Lippincott & Co
Subjects:
Publisher: Philadelphia, J. B. Lippincott & co
Contributing Library: The Library of Congress
Digitizing Sponsor: Sloan Foundation

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READY. 73 Cards. Containing Portraits of the most distin-guished Authors of the times. Price, 50 cents. SLICED ANIMALS. Pictures of 14 different Animals, each piece of the Pic-ture containing a letter, forming the Name of theAnimal, so that as fast as the Picture is put togetherthe Name of the Animal is spelled. Price, 50 cents. SNAP. A very lively Game for children. Price, 25 cents. CliESCENT. New. For children. Price, 25 cents. PABCHEESL The best-selling Game published. Prices, , , PUBLISHED BY E. O. SELOSO^W & 00., Mailed, poMtpnid, on receipt of price. 41 .John Street, IVew Yorlc. IDEIE^OSITODE^IT AMERICAN TRACT SOCIETY, No. 1408 Chestnut Street.After July 1st. 1875. No. 1512 CHESTNUT STREET Where all the Societys Publications, including its looo Books, 4000 Tracts, its celebrated TEACHERS BIBLES, and its six Periodicals, can be had. Of these Periodicals we issue more than half a million each month. H. N. THISSELL, Dist. Secy. PHILADELPHIA AND ITS ENVIRONS—ADVERTISER.

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ONE OF THE BEST PLACES TO oi^x)e:r/ oLOTHiin^a- IS AT E. 0. THOMPSONS, No. 908 Walnut Street, (near the continental hotel,) PHILADELPHIA. WH I C H IS ONE OF THE MOST COMPLETE MERCHANT TAILORING ESTABLISHMENTS IN THE WORLD. HIS STOCK Is always fresh, choice, and ample, embracing every novelty and many THE FASHIONS For each season are fully exemplified by Plates and Pattern Garments. POSSESSING EVERY FACILITY IN HIS BUSINESS,Customers will be sure to have their orders promptly and satisfactorily executed. Please notice theFOLLOAriNG SPECIALTIES: ]|VeDDING and J^ARTY PUTFITS, j^^RMY AND ^TaVY pNIFORMS, Plerical Press, and J^adies poAxs and Riding Wabits. Visitors are always welcome. N.B.—Particular attention is given to out-of-town trade. Gentlemen visiting the city can leave their measures, or those residing at a distance, upon request, will be furnished with directions for self-measurement and samples to select from. IV PHILADELPHIA AND ITS ENVIRONS—ADVERTISER. PACKAGE HAT HOUSK C

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Image from page 490 of “The official guide book to Philadelphia..” (1876)

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Image from page 490 of “The official guide book to Philadelphia..” (1876)
philadelphia travel guide
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Identifier: officialguideboo00west
Title: The official guide book to Philadelphia..
Year: 1876 (1870s)
Authors: Westcott, Thompson
Subjects:
Publisher: Philadelphia, Porter and Coates
Contributing Library: The Library of Congress
Digitizing Sponsor: The Library of Congress

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Eleventh and Market Streets, PHILADELPHIA. ACCOMMODATION FOR FIVE HUUDKED GUESTS, ADVERTISEMENTS. 9 LA PI

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The La Pierbb House, situated at the corner of Bboadway and Chestn-ut Street, having a frontage on Broadway of 200 feet and 60 onChestnut, the most pleasant and fashionable part of the city, with allmodern improvements, comprising 50 Suites with Private Baths and WaterClosets, making it one of the most desirable stopping-places in this city. ^,-,-(L Endorsed by the Centennial Board of Finance, the Presidents xQ^/C1//0, ofthe several Railway Companies, and the Mayor of the City. J-tJ/u. cffliiiii imm-imi mn Oflaee, 1010 Walnut Street. This organization, composed of prominent gentlemen connected with thevarious lines of railway entering the city, and with other enterprises devoted tothe interests of the travelling public, can, by means of its systematic arrange-ments, comfortably provide for the immense number of visitors to the Exhibi-tion. Our plan of operations is to place on sale at the principal Railroad TicketOflSces throughout the United States, Accommodation Tickets, each of whi

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Image from page 36 of “The guide-board to health, peace, and competence ; or, the road to happy old age” (1872)
philadelphia travel guide
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Identifier: guideboardtoheal00hallrich
Title: The guide-board to health, peace, and competence ; or, the road to happy old age
Year: 1872 (1870s)
Authors: Hall, William Whitty, 1810-1876
Subjects: Medicine, Popular
Publisher: Springfield, Mass., D.E. Fisk and company Philadelphia, H. N. McKinney & Co
Contributing Library: University of California Libraries
Digitizing Sponsor: MSN

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exercise, to be highly beneficial, should beactive; a hand gallop or a trot; and, if practicable, adifferent road should be travelled every day, so that the mindmay be diverted by novelties, and thus compelled away frombodily ailments. The English, as a nation, are a stout, robust, hearty race.The nobility have a long list of names who have lived to theage of seventy, eighty, and even ninety years: but horsebackexercise with them is a national amusement; many of themmake a ride on horseback as much a matter of course as adaily dinner. Almost the only gentleman seen on horsebackin New Orleans is the English merchant: showing the powerof a national habit, and its influence abroad as well as athome. If parents could be made to comprehend the full advan-tages of a constant breathing of pure air to their children,and would be at pains to impress their young minds with itshigh importance; were they to pay more attention to theirphysical training, requiring them to take active exercise, for

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OOINQ TO TUE SOUTH. 23 hours every day, on foot and on horseback, there would besome probability that, notwithstanding the heats and impuri-ties of a city atmosphere, those children woidd grow up inhcallhfuluess, and live to a good old age, instead of palingaway, as they do, long before their prime, growing prema-turely old, from a constitution blasted in the bud. It is owing, mainly, to their delight in out-door exercise,that the elevated classes in England reach a patriarchal age,notwithstanding their habits of high living, of late hours, ofwine-drinking, and many other health-destroying agencies;the deaths of their generals, their lords, their earls, and theirdukes are chronicled, almost every week, at seventy, eighty,and ninety years : it is because they will be on horseback, themost elegant, rational, and accomplished of all forms of mereexercise, both for sons and daughters. But the whole creditof longevity to these classes must not be given to their loveof field-sports ; it mus

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Image from page 85 of “Forest leaves” (1905)
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Identifier: forestleaves12sana
Title: Forest leaves
Year: 1905 (1900s)
Authors: Sanatorium Gabriels
Subjects: Hospitals, Chronic Disease
Publisher: Gabriels, N.Y. : The Sanarotium
Contributing Library: The College of Physicians of Philadelphia Historical Medical Library
Digitizing Sponsor: Open Knowledge Commons and the National Endowment for the Humanities

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ation, the elkproved healthy and were liber-ated. They seemed to take kind-ly to their new surroundings, and although somewhat domesticated, theyimmediately sought the mountains and foothills. Old guides and trappersfamiliar with the woods frequently came across the elk in their travels.Since the winter has closed in they can be seen browsing in the secondgrowth timber of the lowlands. While they are truly a branch of the deer family, they are unlikethem in many of their habits, such as traveling in bands, the cows andcalves in one while the bulls and spike horns live largely by themselves.Then, too, they do not yard in like deer, but prefer to roam in theopen, as observed by the writer during the severe cold of last month(52 degrees below7 zero), when a band of four cows and three calves madetheir beds on the ice of Upper St. Regis lake, illustrating that the thick-cover inhabited by deer was not an essential protection. Breeding has shown that the young of these domesticated animals

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16 FOREST LEAVES. will be as wild and alert as though they had been reared in the naturalbreeding grounds in the Rocky Mountains. The buck deer, and in factthe bull moose, shed their horns annually about holiday time, while thebull elk carry their antlers until the early part of March. Many people are led to believe that the number of points or prongsindicate the age of the animal. But this is not true, as we find upon ob-servation that a bull with massive antlers this season may have very in-ferior ones the following year. I believe, however, they are blessed with the best antlers between theage of six and ten years ; and also, if the animal winters exceptionallywell, the main horns will be heavier and stronger than though he had beensubjected to less nutritious food, as it is generally conceded that theantlers require plenty of nourishment until well along in the velvet state.There being no pith in the horn (the same as cattle ) many old huntersbelieve the horn falls off after a suf

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Image from page 258 of “Book of the Royal blue” (1897)

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Identifier: bookofroyalblue20balt
Title: Book of the Royal blue
Year: 1897 (1890s)
Authors: Baltimore and Ohio railroad company. [from old catalog]
Subjects: Middle Atlantic States — Description and travel
Publisher: Baltimore

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PERSONALLY HP/^T TH CCONDUCTED 1. V/ J JTVw ALL EXPENSES INCLUDED FROM Boston, New York, Philadelphia,Chester, Wilmington and Baltimore TO WashingtonR^ichniond Old Point Comfort ON SATURDAYS April 12. 1902 AprU 28. 1902 May . 10, 1902 LEAVE BOSTON ON FRIDAYS PRECEDING Write for Pamphlet Covering Details PERSONALLY T^^^T TU ^CONDUCTE.D X xj KJ M.D ALL EXPENSES INCLUDED TO THE Battlefield of Gettysburgand Washington FROM BOSTON MONDAY, MAY 26. AND FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 12. 1902 FROM NEW YORK AND PHILADELPHIA TUESDAY, MAY 27. AND SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 13, 1902 From BOSTON . . . EXCEPT SUPPER ON FALL RIVER STEAMER From NEWYORK .$ 1 9 From PHILADELPHIA COVERS EVERY EXPENSE:INCLUDING TRANSPORTA-TION FOR THE ROUND TRIP. MEALS EN ROUTE.HOTEL ACCOMMODATIONS. CARRIAGE DRIVES. ETC- For tickets and booklet containing full information call at Royal Blue Line Ticket Agencies, No. 211 Wash-ington Street, Boston, Mass.; 434 and 130O Broadway. New York City, and 834 Chestnut Street. Philadelphia.

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Image from page 121 of “Book of the Royal blue” (1897)
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Identifier: bookofroyalblue15balt
Title: Book of the Royal blue
Year: 1897 (1890s)
Authors: Baltimore and Ohio railroad company. [from old catalog]
Subjects: Middle Atlantic States — Description and travel
Publisher: Baltimore

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ALL EXPENSES INCLUDED FROM New York and Philadelphia TO Washington Richmond The James River Old Point Comfort ON SATURDAYS January 18. 1902 April 12. 1902March , . 1, 1902 April , 26, 1902March . . 15, 1902 May . . lO. 1902March , . 29. 1902 LEAVE BOSTON ON FRIDAYS PRECEDING . . Details to be Announced . . PERSONALLY ^P/^T TU QCONDUCTED L V/ VJ JVO ALL EXPENSES INCLUDED TO THE Battlefield of Gettysburgand Washington FROM BOSTON MONDAY, MAY 2G. AND FRIDAY. SEPTEMBER 12, 1902 FROM NEW YORK AND PHILADELPHIA TUESDAY, MAY 27, AND SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 13, 1902 From BOSTON . . . EXCEPT SUPPER ON FALL RIVER STEAMER From NEWYORK .$ 1 9 From PHILADE-LPHIA COVERS EVERY EXPENSE:INCLUDING TRANSPORTA-TION FOR THE ROUND TRIP. MEALS EN ROUTE.HOTEL ACCOMMODATIONS, CARRIAGE DRIVES, ETC. For tickers and booklet containing full informal ion call at Roval Blue Line Ticket Agencies. No. 211 Wash-ington Street. Boston. Mass : 434 and 1300 Broadway New York City, and 834 Chestnut Street. Philadelphia,

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vl^

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Image from page 216 of “Book of the Royal blue” (1897)
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Identifier: bookofroyalblue01balt
Title: Book of the Royal blue
Year: 1897 (1890s)
Authors: Baltimore and Ohio railroad company. [from old catalog]
Subjects: Middle Atlantic States — Description and travel
Publisher: Baltimore

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Secure copies of Pocket Guide to Washingtonfrom Principal Baltimore £y Ohio Ticket Agencies FINEST DAY TRAIN IN AMERICA

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ROYAL BLUE LINE Royal Limited SPLENDIDAPPOINTMENTS THE besl-appoinled trainsbetween Washington, Balti-more, Philadelpliia and NewYorii are those of the RoyalBlue Line, leaving WashingtonEvery Odd Hour and NewYork Every Even Hourduring the day. <||AII trains have Pullman serv-ice, and dining cars serve allmeals. <|The linest train ol the seriesis the Royal Limited, makingthe run in each direction inFIVE HOURS. <|| It is all Pullman, but no extratare is charged. The cale-smoking, parlor and observa-tion cars are superb, and anexcellent table dhote dinner isserved. ClILighted by electricitythroughout. Royal lira CONVENIENSCHEDULE ited TS J. 3.00 pm 3.44 pm 3.48 pm 3.52 pm 5.17 pm5.50 pm 8.00 pm 8.10 pm 3.50 pm4.00 pm 6.12 pm 6.44 pm8.09 pm 8.13 pm8.16 pm9.00 pm NORTHBOUNl Lv. Washington New Union Station. Ar. Baltimore Camden Station. Lv. Baltimore Camden Station. Lv. Baltimore Ml. Royal Station. Ar. Wilmington Ar. Philadelphia 24th and Chestnut. Ar. New York liberty Street. Ar.

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Image from page 181 of “Book of the Royal blue” (1897)

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Identifier: bookofroyalblue09balt
Title: Book of the Royal blue
Year: 1897 (1890s)
Authors: Baltimore and Ohio railroad company. [from old catalog]
Subjects: Middle Atlantic States — Description and travel
Publisher: Baltimore

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Secure copies of Pocket Guide to Washinjitonfrom Principal Baltimore il^ Ohio Ticket Agencies

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CONVENIENT TERMINALS IN THE GREAT CITIES New York Philadelphia Baltimore Washington Pittsburg Chicago Cincinnati St. Louis Columbus Cleveland Louisville 23d STREET, in the heart of the Hotel, Shop-ping and Theatre District. LIBERTY STREET near Wall Street and theExchanges. 24th and CHESTNUT STREET, on the GreatRetail Street of the Quaker City. MT. ROYAL STATION, the Beautiful UptownStation in Residence District.CAMDEN STATION, in the Center of theBusiness Section. NEW UNION STATION,Connections with all lines South. SMITHFIELD and WATER STREETS, ThreeBlocks from the Center of the City. GRAND CENTRAL PASSENGER STA-TION, Harrison Street and Fifth Avenue. CENTRAL UNION STATION, Third Streetand Central Avenue. UNION STATION, Connections with all lines West and Southwest. UNION STATION. SOUTH WATER STREET, one block fromSuperior Street. FOOT OF SEVENTH STREET. Royal Blue Line PERSONALLY CONDUCTED TOURS TO WASHINGTON ALL EXPENSES INCLUDED 1908Seven=Day Tours from BOSTON February 7 and 21

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Image from page 81 of “Book of the Royal blue” (1897)
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Identifier: bookofroyalblue16balt
Title: Book of the Royal blue
Year: 1897 (1890s)
Authors: Baltimore and Ohio railroad company. [from old catalog]
Subjects: Middle Atlantic States — Description and travel
Publisher: Baltimore

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LPHIA$ 9 From WILMINGTON$ 9 From CHESTER 26. 19039. 1903 27. 19037. 1903 December . 4. 1903 March December . 29. 1902 April . January 15. 1903 April . February . 19. 1903 May . March . . 12. 1903 COVERS EVERY EXPENSE: INCLUDING TRANSPORTA-TION FOR THE ROUND TRIP. MEALS EN ROUTE.TRANSFERS AND TWO DAYS BOARD AT FIRST-CLASSMOTELS IN WASHINGTON, TICKETS ARE GOOD FORRETURN ON ANY TRAIN WITHIN TEN DAYS FROMDATE. AND PERMIT STOP-OVERS AT BALTIMOREAND PHILADELPHIA. … Florida Tours TUESDAYS JANUARYFEBRUARYMARCH = = 271010 FROM New York Philadelphia Baltimore Pittsburg …Wheeling… VERY LOW RATES For detailed Informationcall at Ticket Offices Baltimore «S Ohio R. R. FOR TICKETS AND BOOKLET CONTAINING FULL INFORMATION CALL AT BALTIMORE & OHIOTICKET AGENCIES, No. 211 WASHINGTON STREET, BOSTON, MASS.; 434 AND 1300 BROAD-WAY, 6 ASTOH HOUSE, NEW YORK CITY; 343 FULTON STREET, BROCKLYN. N. Y . AND 834CHESTNUT STREET, NORTHEAST CORNER 13th AND CHESTNUT STREETS. PHILADELPHIA GUIDE TO WASHINGTON

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A MOST beautiful, artistic and practical Guide to Washington, fully illus-trated (covers engraved and printed from steel plate, portrait of Wash-ington from original painting by Stuart, owmed by Boston Art Museum),published by the Passenger Department of the Baltimore & Ohio Railroad, canbe obtained from principal Ticket Agents for ten (10) cents, or will be sent bymail prepaid to any address in the United States, Canada or Mexico on receiptof fifteen (15) cents in stamps. Address C. W. BASSETT, General Passenger Agent, Lines East,Baltimore & Ohio Railroad, Baltimore, Md. B. N. AUSTIN, General Passenger Agent, Lines West, Baltimore A Ohio Railroad, Chicago, III. O. B. MARTIN, Manager Passenger Tralfir,Baltimore A Ohio Railroad, Baltimore, Md.

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Image from page 218 of “Book of the Royal blue” (1897)
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Identifier: bookofroyalblue23balt
Title: Book of the Royal blue
Year: 1897 (1890s)
Authors: Baltimore and Ohio railroad company. [from old catalog]
Subjects: Middle Atlantic States — Description and travel
Publisher: Baltimore

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Secure copies of Pocket Guide to Washingtonfrom Principal Baltimore £y Ohio Ticket Agencies FINEST DAY TRAIN IN AMERICA

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ROYAL BLUE LINE THE it 99 Royal Limited SPLENDIDAPPOINTMENTS THE best-appointed trainsbetween Washington, Balti-more, Philadelphia and NewYork arc those ol the RoyalBlue Line, leaving WashingtonEvery Odd Honr and NewYork Every Even Hourduring the day. (]|A11 trains have Pullman serv-ice, and dining cars serve allmeals. ({jThe linest train of the seriesis the Royal Limited, makingthe run in each direction inFIVE HOURS. €}| It is all Pullman, but no extrafare is charged. The cafe-smoking, parlor and observa-tion cars are superb, and anexcellent table dhote dinner isserved. <jlLighted bythroughout. electricity = THE = Royal limited CONVENIENTSCHEDULES NORTHBOUND, Lv. Washington 3.00 pm New Union Station. Ar. Baltimore 3.44 pm Camden Station. Lv. Baltimore 3.48 pm Camden Station. Lv. Baltimore 3.52 pm Mt. Royai Station. Ar. Wilmington 5.17 pm Ar. Philadelphia 5.50 pm 24tti and Cliestnut. Ar. New York 8.00 pm Liberty Street. Ar. New York 8.10 pm 23d Street. SOUTHBOUND. Lv. New York 3.

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Military Writers Society of America Announces the 2011 book awards and Korean War Book Finalists

(PRWEB) August 02, 2011

The Military Writers Society of America (MWSA) announces the finalists for its 2011 book awards. This year 66 books in 21 categories have received nominations. The MWSA book awards recognize outstanding military-themed books in a wide range of categories from children to adult. The categories include fiction, non-fiction, spiritual/religious, individual service branches, poetry, business/how to, and others. Entries included books published by traditional, subsidy, self-published, and e-book formats.

In addition, MWSA, together with the Center for the Study of the Korean War, Our History Project, and Positively Pittsburg Live, is a co-sponsor of a special Korean War Book Award. Six books are finalists in this category designed to raise awareness of the conflict known as the Forgotten War. The Korean War Book Award contest includes a First Prize Cash Award of $ 150, was open to all authors who have written a book about the Korean War, whether fiction or non-fiction.

The annual Awards program is MWSAs most important and exciting function. We focus on content, style, visual, and technique. Each year, more active military, veteran and historians submit their work. Each year, the competition is more intense, says Joyce Faulkner, president of Military Writers Society of America, and 2011 is no exception.

The Military Writers Society of America is an association of more than 800 authors, poets, artists, and photographers whose core principle is a love of the men and women who defend this nation, and an understanding and respect of their sacrifice and dedication.

MWSA 2011 Award Nominees (In no particular order)

Historical Fiction Event

Beyond Those Hills by M.H.A. Menondji

David & the Mighty Eight by Marjorie Hodgson Parker

Victory Road by Mark Bowlin

The Corydon Snow by Richard Whitten Barnes

Once a Knight by Walt Shiel

Look Long Into the Abyss by A.R. Homer

Historical Fiction Chronicle

Shall Never See So Much by Gerald Gillis

Historical Fiction Protagonist

For Love of Country by William C. Hammond

Fiction Mystery

Loose Ends Kill by Bob Doerr

Laos File by Dale A. Dye

ARGOPELTER by Ronald Smith

I Know Why the Dogwoods Blush by Bill Cain

Fiction Thriller

Project Dragonslayers by Kathy Rowe

Pirates & Cartels by Lee & Vista Boyland

Sgt. Rock – The Lost Battalion, HC by Billy Tucci

The Mullahs Storm by Thomas W. Young

Fiction Literary

The Book in the Wall by John F. Simpson

Non-Fiction History

Eisenhower & Montgomery by William Weidner

Keeping the Promise by Donna Elliott

American Guerilla by Mike Guardia

Targeted Killing by Thomas B. Hunter

T-41 Mescalero: The Military Cessna 172 by Walt Shiel

Lost Eagles by Blaine L. Pardue

Non-Fiction Memoir

DAI Uy Hoch by David R. Hoch

Wing Wife by Marcia J. Sargent

Life Interrupted by War by Thomas van Hees

Lullabies for Lieutenants by Franklin Cox

We Came to Fight a War by Jack Flynn & Alvin E. Kotler

Earning My Wings by Shirley Dobbins Forgan

Non-Fiction Reference

Aerial Aces of the Universal Newsreel by Philip W. Stewart

Non-Fiction Biography

True Blue: A Tale of the Enemy Within by Joe Sanchez & MoDhania

Women in the U.S. Armed Forces by Darlene M. Iskra

Grey Eminence by Edward Cox

Beyond All Price by Carolyn Poling Schriber

Non-Fiction How To/Business

Disability Compensation by Thomas van Hees

Breastfeeding in Combat Boots by Robyn Roche-Paul

Non-Fiction Creative Non-Fiction

Gated Grief by Leila Levinson

Non-Fiction Spiritual/Religious

God + Military Spouse by Lori Kathleen Cline

A Prayer Journey through Deployment by Donna Mull

Bringing Courage to the Courageous by Don Williamson

I Want to be the Fat Pretty One by Lori Kathleen Cline

Artistic Pictorial

USAF Interceptors by Marty Isham & David McLaren

Poetry Book

Through the Years by James Jellerson

Blooming Red by Carolyn Howard-Johnson & Magdelina Ball

Kings of the Green Jelly Moon by L.King, J.Greenwald, J. Jellerson, M. Mullins

Children Ages 12 & Below

The Adventures of Briskey Bear by Steve Bolt

The Sandpiper’s Game by Charles Boyle

Klinger by Betsy Beard

Our Daddy is Invincible by Shannon Maxwell

Eddie & Bingo: A Friendship Tale by Katherine & Kathleen L. Taylor

Military Air Force

Safe Landings by Fran McGraw

Belle of the Brawl by Gary A. Best

The Men Who Killed the Luftwaffe by Jay A. Stout

Two Gold Coins and a Prayer by James H. Keeffe lll

Military Army

Incoming by Jack Manick

Alan’s Letters by Nancy E. Rial

Still Standing by Jim Kosmo

The Sentinel & the Shooter by Douglas W. Bonnot

Inside the President’s Helicopter by G.T. Boyd & J. Boor

War Remains by Jeffery Miller

Military Marines

Obediently Yours, Orson Welles by Ulman Bray

Military Navy

The Seventh Angel by Jeff Edwards

The Untold Experiences by C. Gilbert Lowery

Listening to Ghosts by Robert (Bob) Stockton

Military Coast Guard

The Coast Guard by Tom Beard

Korean War Book Award

Chitose Road by Robert S. Ruehrdanz

A Hill Called White Horse by Tony Sobieski

The Untold Experiences by C. Gilbert Lowery

Truman & MacArthur by Donald Farinacci

Eddie & Bingo by Kathleen & Katherine Taylor

War Remains by Jeffrey Miller

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