Tag Archives: Cool

Cool Liberty Bell images

Some cool liberty bell images:

You would think there is only one restaurant in NYC with a name like this one
liberty bell
Image by Ed Yourdon
This photo was taken on 9th Ave, between 22nd and 23rd Street.

In fact, you probably wouldn’t even think it was a restaurant. A shop? Yeah, maybe — after all, all of us shop for meatballs every once in a while, right?

But a restaurant? Well, okay, NYC is probably big enough to support one such restaurant … and I thought I was photographing something pretty unique when I took this picture. But then, exactly a month after I took this photo, I happened to be trudging along one of the avenues on the Upper East Side, still looking for photos that truly say "this is New York" … and, to my amazement, I saw another Meatball Shop!

Egad! How could this be? Google to the rescue! As soon as I got home, I googled the phrase (yeah, I know that I have a very small life — but admit it: you would have done the same thing!).

And I found that there is not just one, and not just two, Meatball Shops in NYC. There are five such establishments: one in the West Village, one in Chelsea, one in the Upper East Side, one in the Lower East Side, and one in Williamsburgh, Brooklyn. (Sorry, Queens, Bronx, and Staten Island: you aren’t worthy of such an honor).

But where, I hear you asking, where exactly are they located? I thought you would never ask … but here is the URL that will provide the details:

themeatballshop.com/locations/

A couple of additional details for you to ponder: note that patrons of this fine establishment are apparently known as "ballers." And note that the shop was given an "A" rating by the NYC restaurant inspectors; so you can be reasonably confident that they serve nothing but the very best meatballs.

***************

This set of photos is based on a very simple concept: walk every block of Manhattan with a camera, and see what happens. To avoid missing anything, walk both sides of the street.

That’s all there is to it …

Of course, if you wanted to be more ambitious, you could also walk the streets of Brooklyn, Queens, Staten Island, and the Bronx. But that’s more than I’m willing to commit to at this point, and I’ll leave the remaining boroughs of New York City to other, more adventurous photographers.

Oh, actually, there’s one more small detail: leave the photos alone for a month — unedited, untouched, and unviewed. By the time I actually focus on the first of these "every-block" photos, I will have taken more than 8,000 images on the nearby streets of the Upper West Side — plus another several thousand in Rome, Coney Island, and the various spots in NYC where I traditionally take photos. So I don’t expect to be emotionally attached to any of the "every-block" photos, and hope that I’ll be able to make an objective selection of the ones worth looking at.

As for the criteria that I’ve used to select the small subset of every-block photos that get uploaded to Flickr: there are three. First, I’ll upload any photo that I think is "great," and where I hope the reaction of my Flickr-friends will be, "I have no idea when or where that photo was taken, but it’s really a terrific picture!"

A second criterion has to do with place, and the third involves time. I’m hoping that I’ll take some photos that clearly say, "This is New York!" to anyone who looks at it. Obviously, certain landscape icons like the Empire State Building or the Statue of Liberty would satisfy that criterion; but I’m hoping that I’ll find other, more unexpected examples. I hope that I’ll be able to take some shots that will make a "local" viewer say, "Well, even if that’s not recognizable to someone from another part of the country, or another part of the world, I know that that’s New York!" And there might be some photos where a "non-local" viewer might say, "I had no idea that there was anyplace in New York City that was so interesting/beautiful/ugly/spectacular."

As for the sense of time: I remember wandering around my neighborhood in 2005, photographing various shops, stores, restaurants, and business establishments — and then casually looking at the photos about five years later, and being stunned by how much had changed. Little by little, store by store, day by day, things change … and when you’ve been around as long as I have, it’s even more amazing to go back and look at the photos you took thirty or forty years ago, and ask yourself, "Was it really like that back then? Seriously, did people really wear bell-bottom jeans?"

So, with the expectation that I’ll be looking at these every-block photos five or ten years from now (and maybe you will be, too), I’m going to be doing my best to capture scenes that convey the sense that they were taken in the year 2013 … or at least sometime in the decade of the 2010’s (I have no idea what we’re calling this decade yet). Or maybe they’ll just say to us, "This is what it was like a dozen years after 9-11".

Movie posters are a trivial example of such a time-specific image; I’ve already taken a bunch, and I don’t know if I’ll ultimately decide that they’re worth uploading. Women’s fashion/styles are another obvious example of a time-specific phenomenon; and even though I’m definitely not a fashion expert, I suspected that I’ll be able to look at some images ten years from now and mutter to myself, "Did we really wear shirts like that? Did women really wear those weird skirts that are short in the front, and long in the back? Did everyone in New York have a tattoo?"

Another example: I’m fascinated by the interactions that people have with their cellphones out on the street. It seems that everyone has one, which certainly wasn’t true a decade ago; and it seems that everyone walks down the street with their eyes and their entire conscious attention riveted on this little box-like gadget, utterly oblivious about anything else that might be going on (among other things, that makes it very easy for me to photograph them without their even noticing, particularly if they’ve also got earphones so they can listen to music or carry on a phone conversation). But I can’t help wondering whether this kind of social behavior will seem bizarre a decade from now … especially if our cellphones have become so miniaturized that they’re incorporated into the glasses we wear, or implanted directly into our eyeballs.

Oh, one last thing: I’ve created a customized Google Map to show the precise details of each day’s photo-walk. I’ll be updating it each day, and the most recent part of my every-block journey will be marked in red, to differentiate it from all of the older segments of the journey, which will be shown in blue. You can see the map, and peek at it each day to see where I’ve been, by clicking on this link

URL link to Ed’s every-block progress through Manhattan

If you have any suggestions about places that I should definitely visit to get some good photos, or if you’d like me to photograph you in your little corner of New York City, please let me know. You can send me a Flickr-mail message, or you can email me directly at ed-at-yourdon-dot-com

Stay tuned as the photo-walk continues, block by block …

Cool Philadelphia Tourism images

Check out these philadelphia tourism images:

ji6592.JPG
philadelphia tourism
Image by Sangre-La.com
ji6592 new hope pa pennsylvania bucks county the parry mansion museum

Common Threads, mural by Meg Saligman, 1997
philadelphia tourism
Image by carlosoliveirareis
Restaurado em 2011 pela City of Philadelphia Mural Arts Program @ Philadelphia PA, EUA

IMG_0754

Pennsylvania – Valley Forge: Welcome Center at Valley Forge
philadelphia tourism
Image by wallyg
Valley Forge National Historical Park, encompassing 3,466-acres eighteen miles northwest of Philadelphia, preserves and reinterprets the site where the the main body of the Continental Army–between 10,000 and 12,000 troops–was encamped during from December 19, 1778 to June 19, 1778, the American Revolutionary War.

After the Battle of White Marsh (or Edge Hill), Washington chose Valley Forge as an encampment because it was between the Continental Congress in York, Supply Depots in Reading, and British forces in Philadelphia. Undernourished and poorly clothed through the harsh winter, Washington’s troops were ravaged by disease, suffering as many as two thousand losses, with thousands more listed as unfit for futy. Despite the conditions, the winter at Valley Forge proved invaluable for the young army, which underwent its first uniform training regimen, under the guidance of Prussian drill master, Baron Friedrich von Steuben.

Valley Forge, named for the iron forge built along Valley Creek in the 1740’s, was established as the first state park of Pennsylvania in 1893 by the Valley Forge Park Commission. In 1923, the VFPC was brought under the Department of Forests and Waters and later incorporated into the Pennsylvania Historical and Museum Commission in 1971. In 1976, Pennsylvania gave the park as a gift to the nation for the the Bicentennial. The National Park System established the area as Valley Forge National Historical Park on July 4, 1976.

The modern park features a newly renovated Welcome Center, which includes a museum exhibit with artifacts found during excavations of the park, an interactive Muster Roll of Continental Soldiers encamped at Valley Forge, Ranger-led Gallery Programs and Walks, A Storytelling Program, A Photo Gallery, A Tourism Bureau Information Desk and the Encampment Store.

Valley Forge National Historical Park National Register #66000657 (1966)

Cool Philadelphia Travel Company images

A few nice philadelphia travel company images I found:

Image from page 58 of “Glimpses of medical Europe” (1908)
philadelphia travel company
Image by Internet Archive Book Images
Identifier: glimpsesofmedica00thom
Title: Glimpses of medical Europe
Year: 1908 (1900s)
Authors: Thompson, Ralph L. (Ralph Leroy), 1872-
Subjects: Medicine Medicine Education, Medical Travel
Publisher: Philadelphia, London, J.B. Lippincott company
Contributing Library: Columbia University Libraries
Digitizing Sponsor: Open Knowledge Commons

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Botany and turn the laughon Professor Rosen. While Linnaeus was able to make hisdepartment in the University of Sweden themost famous in the world, and to keep foreignnations and learned societies busy in con-ferring medals and degrees upon him, he wasnever able to classify his own little homeherbarium. His wife was reported to be givento frivolity and dissipation, and, notwith-standing the fame of her husband, she wasfinally denied admission to the Court. Thefive children of these two incompatibles wentfor the most part the way of the mother,although one daughter made some importantexperiments in plant life, and a son, whonever did anything out of the ordinary, suc-ceeded Linnaeus at the University. 50 UPSALA Linnaeus was apparently a man who shouldnot have married, for he did not have thehappy faculty of mixing emotion with intel-lect, and it was undoubtedly his neglect ofhis wife that caused her to seek companion-ship in those whose knowledge was lesscryptogamous than her husbands.

Text Appearing After Image:
House of Linn^.us We found the medical department of theUniversity of great interest. There are abouta hundred and sixty students of medicine here,and their needs are amply provided for. It isinteresting to compare some points in the med-ical training here with those at home. Take,for instance, the course in pathology. Thestudent here has pathology rubbed into him 51 MEDICAL EUROPE for three years, and he can get more if hewishes. There is a large building devotedwholly to pathology. It contains lecture-rooms, museum, post-mortem room, and nu-merous rooms for individual research. Thereare two professorships in this subject. UlrikQuensel, wdio is chief of the department, is apleasant man to meet. He has a pleasingsmile and a nice little way of throwing backhis head when he laughs, which he does fre-quently. All the time he was showing usabout he held tenaciously to the butt of asmall cigar. There was perhaps two centi-metres of it in all. Occasionally he wouldmanage to get the end of i

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Image from page 346 of “The Street railway journal” (1884)
philadelphia travel company
Image by Internet Archive Book Images
Identifier: streetrailwayjo281906newy
Title: The Street railway journal
Year: 1884 (1880s)
Authors:
Subjects: Street-railroads Electric railroads Transportation
Publisher: New York : McGraw Pub. Co.
Contributing Library: Smithsonian Libraries
Digitizing Sponsor: Smithsonian Libraries

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ONE OF THE .500-KW, D. C. TURBO-GENERATORS IN POWERSTATION NO. 2 the same. This indicates that the brakes do not release well,and also indicates a continuous friction which consumesenergy that should be more usefully applied to the operationof the equipment. SCHEDULES AND FARES At present a half-hour schedule is given on the WestChester line between West Chester and Sixty-Third Street. CONSTRUCTION CAR, PHILADELPHIA S.TRACTION COMPANY WEST CHESTER

Text Appearing After Image:
STANDARD INTERURBAN CAR WITH STEEL UNDERFRAME Ol-& WEST CHESTER TRACTION COMPANY A 15-minute schedule is given on the Ardmore line fromSixty-Third Street to Ardmore. A 15-minute schedule is givenon the Clifton line from Sixty-Third Street to Collindale. Theservice is given with single-car units. As soon as the elevatedtrains are placed in operation it is proposed to give thesesame schedules, but it is believed that at certain hours of theday, at least, it will be necessary to run two and three-car The fares are based on the zone system, and a separate 5-cent fare is collected from each passenger at each zone. For watching the efficiency of the schedules, the record,shown on the opposite page, is kept. On this is entered thenumber of passengers carried on each trip, in each fare zone,and as the seating capacity of the cars is known, it becomesa simple matter to determine if the cars are properly servingthe travel at each hour of the day.In this sheet the number of pas-sengers is en

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Image from page 144 of “Illustrated catalogue and general description of improved machine tools for working metal” (1899)
philadelphia travel company
Image by Internet Archive Book Images
Identifier: illustratedcatal00sell
Title: Illustrated catalogue and general description of improved machine tools for working metal
Year: 1899 (1890s)
Authors: Sellers, William, & co. [from old catalog]
Subjects: Machine-tools Machinery
Publisher: Philadephia, Levytype company
Contributing Library: The Library of Congress
Digitizing Sponsor: The Library of Congress

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and supported by an ex-tended bearing which is as large as the head itself, and relieves the spindle ofbending strain. The saddle carrying this cutter-head is 54 long, and is gibbedto place with large brass shoes. Cutter-head is driven by belt without u.se oflong shafts and sliding keys. The power feed is adjustable, and varies from iper revolution of the cutter-head to 4. Rapid power traverse is arranged formoving head quickly to place, and the two levers operating the feeding and trav-ersing mechanism are interlocked to prevent both being thrown in at the sametime. The table shown in the plate is 8 ft. long by 36 wide, and is adjustableto and from the cutter-head to regulate the amount of feed. Fast and loose pul-leys on countershaft are 24 diameter for 4 belt, and should make 260 revolu-tions per minute. N. B.—These machines are made with various leiigths of travel and differentarrangements for supporting ivork. Sellers & Co., Incorporated, Philadelphia, Pa. 39 Plate No. 114.

Text Appearing After Image:
ROTARY PI.ANER FOR ARMOR PLATES. The cutter-head having 75 tools, arranged in circle 50 diameter, will planework 26 ft. long, carried upon two tables, each 8 ft. long by 7 ft. 6 wide.These tables are adjustable to and from the cutter-head by power to regulatedepth of cut ; the head is provided with power traverse at the rate of 20 ft. perminute for adjustment and variable friction feed. Power is conve^ed to head bybelts without use of long shafts and sliding bearings. Machine complete withcountershaft, wrenches, and sample set of cutters. Fast and loose pulleys oncountershaft 24 by 5^2 face, and should make 400 revolutions per minute. Note.—The cutter-head and saddle of this machine were designed to meeta demand for a more powerful and more rigid tool than any in the market, andspecial attention was paid to strength of parts and arrangement and size of bear-ings. IVe make this machine ivith 7arious foiDis of table and fo> bridge-7Cork,arrange it to sivivel. 140 Wm. Sellers &

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Cool Philadelphia Travel Company images

A few nice philadelphia travel company images I found:

Image from page 306 of “Rambles in the path of the steam-horse. An off-hand olla podrida, embracing a general historical and descriptive view of the scenery, agricultural and mineral resources, and prominent features of the travelled route from Baltimore
philadelphia travel company
Image by Internet Archive Book Images
Identifier: ramblesinpathofs00bowe
Title: Rambles in the path of the steam-horse. An off-hand olla podrida, embracing a general historical and descriptive view of the scenery, agricultural and mineral resources, and prominent features of the travelled route from Baltimore to Harper’s Ferry, Cumberland, Wheeling, Cincinnati, and Louisville
Year: 1855 (1850s)
Authors: Bowen, Eli, b. 1824
Subjects: Baltimore and Ohio Railroad Company
Publisher: Philadelphia, W. Bromwell and W. W. Smith Baltimore, S. B. Hickcox, agent
Contributing Library: West Virginia University Libraries
Digitizing Sponsor: Lyrasis Members and Sloan Foundation

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f Cumberland Coal.—Coking. Professor Johnson, in the experiments alluded to, and vrhich haveserved more definitely to fix the standard of American coals than anyprevious examinations or analyses, procured specimens of the chiefBritish American coals, as well as several specimens of bituminous andsemi-bituminous coals from England. The results flowing from the comparison of these, when subjected tothe same tests as those of the coals of the United States, and which arepublished in detail in his valuable report, show that in steam generatingand vietallurgic properties they all fall below the standard of the Cum-berland coal. ]Mr. Mushet, whose authority on coal is held in the highestestimation in England, thus speaks of the Cumberland coal analysedby him :— The specimen of coal sent is the very best bitunnnous coal Iever saw. I should consider it well adapted to iron-making. It containsand will form, as much weight of coke from a given quantity, as the bestSouth Wales furnace coals.

Text Appearing After Image:
Making Coke at Irostburg. Coke is fabricated by subjecting coal to the roasting process, in closeretorts, or in heaps in the open air, by the aid of which process itsvolatile properties are driven off, while its carbon remains. The magni-tude of the coal in this operation is increased, but its density is dimin-ished. In the experiments of Professor Johnson, eoal from the big veingave, by slow diking, seventy-eight per cent, of coke, and by rapid 290 RAMBLES IN THE PATH OF THE STEAM HORSE. Coking Coal. application of heat, seventy-two per cent. This vein, it is well known,is not very bituminous. A considerable quantity of coke is made at themines near Frostburg, as well as at Mount Savage, for consumption atthe iron works. The mode of coking is very similar to that of charingwood, being in heaps, in the open air. For the purpose of coking inheaps, a level spot is selected, a temporai-y chimney of brick is erected,with alternate holes, some of which are necessary at the base. Aroundthis

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Image from page 31 of “Glimpses of medical Europe” (1908)
philadelphia travel company
Image by Internet Archive Book Images
Identifier: glimpsesofmedica00thom
Title: Glimpses of medical Europe
Year: 1908 (1900s)
Authors: Thompson, Ralph L. (Ralph Leroy), 1872-
Subjects: Medicine Medicine Education, Medical Travel
Publisher: Philadelphia, London, J.B. Lippincott company
Contributing Library: Columbia University Libraries
Digitizing Sponsor: Open Knowledge Commons

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Image from page 431 of “Book of the Royal blue” (1897)
philadelphia travel company
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Identifier: bookofroyalblue22balt
Title: Book of the Royal blue
Year: 1897 (1890s)
Authors: Baltimore and Ohio railroad company. [from old catalog]
Subjects: Middle Atlantic States — Description and travel
Publisher: Baltimore
Contributing Library: The Library of Congress
Digitizing Sponsor: Sloan Foundation

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Observation Cars between Baltimore and pittsburgBaltimore and Cincinnati *&» *?» Over Different Routes-ttlcat of Cumberland^ ^be picturesque Route of Hmerica The Book of the Royal Blue for October will be a Hunting andFishing Number. Send eight (8) cents in stamps for copy after September 25. Royal Blue trains

Text Appearing After Image:
JVew York • Philadelphia • Baltimore Washington • pittsburg ■ Cincinnati • St- Louis • Chicago •

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