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Image from page 147 of “Across the continent and around the world” (1872)

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Image from page 147 of “Across the continent and around the world” (1872)
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Identifier: acrosscontinenta00dist
Title: Across the continent and around the world
Year: 1872 (1870s)
Authors: [Disturnell, John] 1801-1877. [from old catalog]
Subjects: Railroads Steamboat lines. [from old catalog] Distances Travel
Publisher: Philadelphia, W. B. Zieber
Contributing Library: The Library of Congress
Digitizing Sponsor: The Library of Congress

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TWO GAILY TRA1NB Are run on each Division of this Road from CHICAGO to all Points J^ORTH, J40RTHWE3T AJ^D W£J3T. THE ONLY MAIL ROUTE FROM CHICAGO TO ALL POINTS IN THE NORTHWEST. Shortest Time to OMAHA, and connecting at that Point with theUNION PACIFIC RAILROAD, for DINYER, SALT LAKE, SAN FRANCISCO, And all Points on the PACIFIC COAST. PULLMAN PALACE CARS ON ALL NIGHT TRAINS. BAGGAGE CHECKED TO ALL, PRINCIPAL POINTS. Through Tickets on sale at all the Principal Offices in the United Statesand Canadas, and at the Companys Offices, 229 BROADWAY, NEW YORK. AND RAILROAD OFFICE, CHICAGO, ILL. H. P. STANWOOD, General Ticket Agent. JOHN C. GAULT, General Supt.

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BuRLIHQTOH RaILHOAD RoUTS, VIA THE BWLMVnH MB MMB9IMIBIWBB BMUB&MB* This is acknowledged to be the ®af ®eif basest &a£L Mmm% Mmm Leading to three Great Portions of the West:— 1st. To COUNCIL BLUFFS and OMAHA, connecting with theGreat Pacific Roads. 2d. To PLATTSMOUTH and LINCOLN, and the Great Agri-cultural Region South of the Platte, where RailroadLands and Homesteads abound. 3d. To ST. JOSEPH, KANSAS CITY, and all Kansas Points. THE BURLINGTON LINE IS EQUIPPED WITH THE muim & Pmllmmm ISimpimg @mm9 Pullman Bimimg ©Guts* AND IS THE ONLY ROAD WEST OF CHICAGO EQUIPPED WITH THE WESTiHGHGtfSE SAFETY AIH SHAKE. A. E. TEUZALIN, Genl Pass. Agt.W. D. COWLES, Eastern Pass. Agt. C. E. PARKINS, Genl Supt. BTFRJLINGTOIT, IOWA. UB8AS PMIf I€ RAILWAY.

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Image from page 295 of “Rambles in the path of the steam-horse. An off-hand olla podrida, embracing a general historical and descriptive view of the scenery, agricultural and mineral resources, and prominent features of the travelled route from Baltimore
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Identifier: ramblesinpathofs00bowe
Title: Rambles in the path of the steam-horse. An off-hand olla podrida, embracing a general historical and descriptive view of the scenery, agricultural and mineral resources, and prominent features of the travelled route from Baltimore to Harper’s Ferry, Cumberland, Wheeling, Cincinnati, and Louisville
Year: 1855 (1850s)
Authors: Bowen, Eli, b. 1824
Subjects: Baltimore and Ohio Railroad Company
Publisher: Philadelphia, W. Bromwell and W. W. Smith Baltimore, S. B. Hickcox, agent
Contributing Library: West Virginia University Libraries
Digitizing Sponsor: Lyrasis Members and Sloan Foundation

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en deposited before the oldest of the latter. They thus occupy an uncon-formable position to eachother, as exhibited in thesame figure, whereas theupper horizontal beds, a,^ ■ are unconformable to the lower inclined deposits, 6. This simple illustration is very important,because it often shows the position of coal or other veins lying in anunconformable position to the more modern overlaying surface. Variouswriters have cautioned the observer against certain deceptive appear-ances of the strata in particu-lar lines of coast, (which areno less frequent in our moun-tain regions,) where beds, ap-parently horizontal, in realitydip at a very considerablel^jj^ angle. The following figure,m, 29, exhibits a headland, asseen from the south, in whichthe strata appear to the eyeperfectly level. There appears to be no mistake about their horizontalposition; but if the headland turns off, at the pointy, in fig. .30, to thenorthward, afibrding a view of the cliffs to the westward, it will be seen

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Fig. 29.

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Image from page 31 of “Summer vacation tours : under escort : first-class, with all expenses included to Colorado, Utah, Lake Tahoe, Yosemite Valley, California, Yellowstone Park, Pacific Coast, Canadian Rockies : summer of 1913” (1913)

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Image from page 31 of “Summer vacation tours : under escort : first-class, with all expenses included to Colorado, Utah, Lake Tahoe, Yosemite Valley, California, Yellowstone Park, Pacific Coast, Canadian Rockies : summer of 1913” (1913)
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Identifier: summervacationto421chic
Title: Summer vacation tours : under escort : first-class, with all expenses included to Colorado, Utah, Lake Tahoe, Yosemite Valley, California, Yellowstone Park, Pacific Coast, Canadian Rockies : summer of 1913
Year: 1913 (1910s)
Authors: Chicago, Union Pacific & North Western Line
Subjects: National parks and reserves Railroad travel
Publisher: [Chicago : Dept. of Tours, Chicago, Union Pacific and North Western Line]
Contributing Library: Harold B. Lee Library
Digitizing Sponsor: Brigham Young University

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S ANGELES. CAL.—H. O. Wilson 120 West Sixth St. MILWAUKEE, WIS.—L. L. Davis 914 Majestic Bldg. MINNEAPOLIS. MINN.—H. F. Carter 25 South Third St. NEW YORK CITY—J. B. De Friest 287 Broadway OAKLAND. CAL.—H. V. Blasdel 1228 Broadway OGDEN. UTAH—Paul Beemer 2514 Washington Ave. OMAHA. NEB.—L. Beindorff 1324 Farnam St. PHILADELPHIA. PA.—S. C. Milbourne 841 Chestnut St. PITTSBURGH. PA.—J. E. Corfield 539 Smithfield St. SACRAMENTO. CAL.—Jas. Warrack 804 K St. ST. LOUIS. MO.—A. J. Dutcher 315-17 North Ninth St. SALT LAKE CITY. UTAH—L. J. Keyes Hotel Utah Bldg. SAN FRANCISCO. CAL.—S. F. Booth 42 Powell St. SAN JOSE. CAL.—F. W. Angier 19 North First St. SEATTLE. WASH.—J. H. ONeill 716 Second Avenue TACOMA. WASH.—W. Carrthers 1117 Pacific Avenue TORONTO, ONT.—John J. Rose 10 Dominion Bond Bldg. GERRIT FORT. W. S. BASINGER. Passenger Traffic Manager. General Passenger Agent W. H. MURRAY. W. K. CUNDIFF. Asst General Passr Agent. Asst Genl Passr Agent. OMAHA. NEB.

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The Narrows—Williams Canyon, Colorado Springs, Colo. WINTER TOURS C First-Class Tours under Escort, includ-ing all expenses, for the Winter Season1913-1914, will take in all the principalresorts of California, Mexico, the HawaiianIslands and other scenic countries. Thoseinterested should request that their namesbe entered on our Mailing List for copy ofthe Winter Tours Publication with full par-ticulars, which will be forwarded as soon aspublished. C No matter where or when you or yourfriends contemplate a trip. The Departmentof Tours of The Chicago, Union Pacific andNorth Western Line solicits correspondencein regard to it and suggests that you availyourself of the unlimited services and assis-tance it is in a position to render. S. A. HUTCHISON Manager Department of Tours 148 S. Clark Street Chicago A746-13-5M(Addtl.) HAND M.NALLY & CO., Chicagro.

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Image from page 233 of “Rambles in the path of the steam-horse. An off-hand olla podrida, embracing a general historical and descriptive view of the scenery, agricultural and mineral resources, and prominent features of the travelled route from Baltimore

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Image from page 233 of “Rambles in the path of the steam-horse. An off-hand olla podrida, embracing a general historical and descriptive view of the scenery, agricultural and mineral resources, and prominent features of the travelled route from Baltimore
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Identifier: ramblesinpathofs00bowe
Title: Rambles in the path of the steam-horse. An off-hand olla podrida, embracing a general historical and descriptive view of the scenery, agricultural and mineral resources, and prominent features of the travelled route from Baltimore to Harper’s Ferry, Cumberland, Wheeling, Cincinnati, and Louisville
Year: 1855 (1850s)
Authors: Bowen, Eli, b. 1824
Subjects: Baltimore and Ohio Railroad Company
Publisher: Philadelphia, W. Bromwell and W. W. Smith Baltimore, S. B. Hickcox, agent
Contributing Library: West Virginia University Libraries
Digitizing Sponsor: Lyrasis Members and Sloan Foundation

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n she tell you how she does things ;—but she does them,and you know by the old rule, which tells us that the proof of thepudding is in the eating thereof, that she does them well. From herJohnny cake up to her saddle of mountain venison, the same excellencepervades her every efibrt, and the cook, therefore, in the varied privilegesof her superiority, is allowed unchecked to scald the pointer dogs, rapthe youthful skulls of peering dar-kies, and even pin the dish-cloth toyoung masters coat, when he venturesinto the threshold of her province. Our old friend here is a specimen,and a good one, of the Virginia boot-black, now almost unknown in tlmore travelled portions of the StatThere he sits, as in the engravin^,,morning after morning, with a rowof shining boots,—green tops, fairtops, and rod tops—ranged before himlike soldiers upon dress parade; whilenear him a pile of the same useful articles of pedal wear, still dis-colored with yesterdaj^^s mud, await the exercise of his skill.

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Tl e I!oot-Uaok. RAMBLES IN THE PATH OF THE STEAM HORSE. 217Slaves and Slavery.—The Boot-black. Like all old negroes, who have belonged to decayed families, there is atouch of melancholy in his demeanor, and right solemnly does he dwellupon the past. But what we wish especially to mention—as marking,indeed, the whole class to which he belongs—is the wonderful facilitywith which he forms a true estimate of those with whom he may be broughtin contact. He is seldom in error, and you will try in vain to ring coun-terfeit coin upon him. The true old-fashioned gentleman—the passingaway of whoso race, none lament more than he—though thread-bare andbroken in fortune, is at once recognised by old Billy, and treated withthe most humble deference and respect; while your fresh upstart, stand-ing in his flashy dress, and swelling with the pride of new-gotten wealth,meets but cold civility at his hands, and always occasions some mutteredcontrast with the gentlemen of former days, not espe

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Acela Express #2004
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Acela Express (often called simply Acela) is the name used by Amtrak for the high-speed tilting train service operating between Washington, D.C. and Boston via Baltimore, Philadelphia, and New York along the Northeast Corridor (NEC) in the Northeast United States. The tilting design allows the train to travel at higher speeds on the sharply curved NEC without disturbing passengers, by lowering lateral G-forces.

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Acela_Express

Image from page 254 of “The American sportsman:” (1871)

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Image from page 254 of “The American sportsman:” (1871)
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Identifier: americansportsma01lewi
Title: The American sportsman:
Year: 1871 (1870s)
Authors: Lewis, Elisha Jarrett, 1820-1877. [from old catalog]
Subjects: Shooting Game and game-birds Firearms Hunting
Publisher: Philadelphia, J. B. Lippincott & co.
Contributing Library: The Library of Congress
Digitizing Sponsor: Sloan Foundation

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■»u»EMA«-mp[i,„«.aB CHAPTER XVI. ESQUIMAUX CURLEW, OR SHORT-BILLED CURLEW. SCOLOPAXBOREALIS. Soothed by the murmurs of the sea-beat shore,His dun-gray plumage floating to the gale,The curlew blends his melancholy wailWith those hoarse sounds the rushing waters pour. NOMENCLATURE AND DESCRIPTION. 9^^^ HIS large and handsome bird is known toour shooters as the jack curlew, or short-l)illed curlew, in contradistinction to theother variety, the Numenius longerostris,or long-billed curlew. The Esquimaux curlew is eighteeninches long and thirty-two inches in ex-tent ; the bill, which is four inches and ahalf long, is black towards the point, and a pale, purplish flesh-color near the base; upper part of the head dark brown, divided

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16 241 242 lewiss AMERICAN SPORTSMAN. by a narrow stripe of brownish-white; over each eye extends abroad line of pale drab; iris dark-colored; hind part of the neckstreaked with dark brown; fore-part and whole breast very palebrown; upper part of the body pale drab, centered and barredwith dark brown, and edged with spots of white on the exteriorvanes; three primaries black, with white shafts; rump and tail-coverts barred with dark brown; belly white; vent the same,marked with zigzag lines of brown on^a dark cream ground; legsand naked thighs a pale lead-color. This bird, like most others of our sea-fowl, is migratory, arrivingin the Middle States from the South early in the spring, and re-maining a short time, feeding on the mud-flats and salt marshes,in company with various others of the feathered race. After thisthey take up their line of march for the Far North, where theyspend the summer in breeding and rearing their young. Theshort-billed curlews travel in large bodies, and keep

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Image from page 266 of “Gleanings from fifty years in China” (1910)
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Identifier: gleaningsfromfif00litt
Title: Gleanings from fifty years in China
Year: 1910 (1910s)
Authors: Little, Archibald John, 1838-1908 Little, Archibald, Mrs., d. 1926
Subjects: China China — Description and travel
Publisher: Philadelphia : J. B. Lippincott
Contributing Library: University of California Libraries
Digitizing Sponsor: MSN

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t and get-upare indistinguishable from real women. A table coveredwith an embroidered cloth may represent a throne, orwith plain red cloth a magistrates yamen. The dressing-room is a half-open gallery running alongthe side of the courtyard behind the stage, where the actorschange their dresses and alter their make-up with wonder-ful celerity. Their wardrobes, carried about from placeto place in heavy iron-bound chests, are often of greatvalue, and some of the most beautiful embroideries broughtto Europe for sale are discarded actors dresses. As inmost things, Chinese actors, who with barbers are the soledegraded caste in China, their children being inadmissibleto the official examinations, have a euphemistic synonym,and in literary language are known as the Children ofthe Pear-garden, so named from a school of acting foundedby the great patron of actors, the Emperor Shiian-tsungof the Tang dynasty (720 a.d.), who invited troupes ofactors to study in his pear orchard. This Emperor also

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cq t^ 2 to ^ < 5 U 1 THE CHINESE DRAMA 221 supervised the performances of the ladies of the hareem,and is said to have composed many new airs to the oper-ettas then in vogue, which airs are known to this dayas the perfumes of the Li-chi, the celebrated luscious fruitof South China. He is said to have established a bureaufor theatricals and music, and took much the sameinterest in the stage as the great Napoleon did in theComedie Francaise, without neglecting other work. It isnoteworthy that this same Emperor founded the renownedHanlin college, the Academy of China. Women in China enjoyed great freedom in ancienttimes, as is shown by the Book of Odes, the oldest extantChinese work. And since women have been forbidden onthe stage their social position appears to have muchdeclined. A Chinese theatrical company is rigorouslydivided into fixed parts as in Europe, each actor havinghis technical name, such as Pere Noble, Jeune premier,Premier comique. Second comique, Jeune Premiere, anda

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Image from page 256 of “When to send for the doctor : and what to do before the doctor comes” (1913)
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Identifier: whentosendfordoc00lipp
Title: When to send for the doctor : and what to do before the doctor comes
Year: 1913 (1910s)
Authors: Lippert, Frieda E., 1867- Holmes, Arthur, 1872-
Subjects: Children First aid in illness and injury
Publisher: Philadelphia : J.B. Lippincott Company
Contributing Library: The Library of Congress
Digitizing Sponsor: The Library of Congress

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hin rubber tis-sue). Lastly, confine all by a firmclean bandage of suitable length andwidth. Insect Stings. Insect stings make painful wounds,sometimes out of all proportion to theirsize. The old-fashioned homely ap-plication of mud is not to be despised221 WHEN TO SEND for such a catastrophe. If this is notat hand, hartshorn or water of am-monia, and, similarly, spirit of cam-phor, will relieve the pain markedly. Bleeding. The management of bleeding callsfor the exercise of intelligence. It willbe necessary, for instance, to decidewhether the bleeding vessel be an ar-tery or a vein. Arterial Bleeding. From a cut artery the blood willcome with considerable force, in jets or spurts. To stop the flow, find the route or line of travel of the ar-tery that is wounded, and make a firm,steady pressure, with one or boththumbs upon it, between the wound andthe heart. We will give some familiar landmarks whereby it will be possi-ble to find the vessels route. This thumb pressure is the best 222

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FOR THE DOCTOR means, usually, of checking a flow ofblood, unless it be extraordinarily freeand the vessel too deep to find easily.In such a case, place between the foldsof a large clean towel, or handkerchief,a smooth stone, or a potato, as an extracompress. With the handkerchiefaround the limb and the compress directly upon the artery between thewound and the heart, place a stick orcane, or ruler, between the handkerchiefand the skin opposite the compress,twisting it firmly and forcibly until thebleeding stops. Upon removing thestick, keep the pad of stone or potatoin place for half an hour, to make sureof no return of the flow. Bleeding from a Vein. When a vein is wounded, the flow ofblood is not in spurts, but in a steadystream and without force. To checkit, remove at once all confining bands,garters, or skirt strings between the £23 WHEN TO SEND wound and the heart; next raise theinjured part of the body and apply acompress, made as described above, di-rectly upon the injury. Ca

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Image from page 318 of “The Street railway journal” (1884)

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Image from page 318 of “The Street railway journal” (1884)
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Identifier: streetrailwayjo191902newy
Title: The Street railway journal
Year: 1884 (1880s)
Authors:
Subjects: Street-railroads Electric railroads Transportation
Publisher: New York : McGraw Pub. Co.
Contributing Library: Smithsonian Libraries
Digitizing Sponsor: Smithsonian Libraries

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t, and that there is a hingingbreak in the coaming, plank-sheer and upper strake, which permitof easy ingress and egress, so that the boat can be loaded andunloaded with rapidity, thus avoiding any unnecessary delays.The launch was operated with great success by the Omaha &Council Bluffs Railway last summer, and proved a good invest- NAME PLATEMACHINE March i, 1902.] STREET RAILWAY JOURNAL. ment. The Electric Launch Company of Bayonne City, N. J.,builder of this boat, has recently adopted for its pleasure launchesthe new lightweight type of battery, which is about 35 per cent,lighter in weight than that hitherto used for marine purposes. ELECTRIC FOUNTAINSLike the electric launch, this is an amusement which is particu-larly suitable for street railway parks, from the fact that electriccurrent for the operation of the fountain is always available, andany mechanic who can understand the handling of a railway motoris sufficiently adept to understand the electrical requirements of the

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TWO VARIETIES OF ELECTRIC FOUNTAINS fountain apparatus. From the time that the electric fountainestablished its reputation as a popular amusement at the WorldsFair in Chicago, in 1893, it has kept a foremost place in the listof popular and decorative effects at amusement resorts. Thishas been due largely to the efforts of the Darlington ElectricFountain & Supply Company, of Philadelphia, which is the fore-most if not practically the only builder of these fountains in thiscountry, and which has made a specialty of the subject, so that itnow builds fountains suitable for the largest parks or for smallerenterprises, and even, if requested, small enough for banquettables. The variety of displays is almost limitless, as by chang-ing the colors, direction and shape of the jets an endless varietyin colors and displays can be secured. In this way an audience the Chicago chute, which was built in 1894, were about ,000.Chutes in Baltimore, Atlantic City, Atlanta, San Francisco andelsewhe

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Image from page 60 of “American railway transportation” (1908)
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Identifier: americanrailwayt1908john
Title: American railway transportation
Year: 1908 (1900s)
Authors: Johnson, Emory R. (Emory Richard), 1864-1950
Subjects: Railroads Railroads and state
Publisher: New York, D. Appleton and company
Contributing Library: Mugar Memorial Library, Boston University
Digitizing Sponsor: Boston University

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li^i Uiiai liDAD vc*ji2 iiifj) ^^iijAX l^A^•l{I3»^2, From Philadelphia to Pittsburgh, THROUGH IN 3i DAYS: -».VO BV STE^.^ BO^TS, CIRBXMJVG THE V^TiTEO STATES Jit.tMMf% From PIlTKBlIRCiH lo LOIIISVIUE

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Image from page 253 of “Explorations and adventures in the wilds of Africa;” (1909)

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Image from page 253 of “Explorations and adventures in the wilds of Africa;” (1909)
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Identifier: explorationsadve00wils
Title: Explorations and adventures in the wilds of Africa;
Year: 1909 (1900s)
Authors: Wilson, James Russell
Subjects:
Publisher: [Philadelphia?]
Contributing Library: The Library of Congress
Digitizing Sponsor: The Library of Congress

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fall I was actually left alonein my house with my boys, both of whom were anxious to be off.Adventures of Andersscn. Another explorer who has gained a world-wide fame and deserves totoe ranked with such heroes as Stanley, Emin Pasha, Speke and Grant,and others, is Andersson, who gives us a graphic account of his travelstSeveral of his remarkable experiences we here reproduce, and the readerwill doubtless confirm the opinion that these are of special interest. Oneextraordinary part of his travels in the Tropics relates to the privationsand sufferings which he and his party underwent from lack of water.The reader must remember that travellers in the Tropics very often suffer GALAXY OF RENOWNED EXPLORERS. 255 from extreme thirst. Anderssons experience in this respect is one of the most remarkable on record. The following is his vivid account of it, On the second evening, or on the third after leaving Okaoa, I saw the guides suddenly halt and look about them, as if undecided how to pn>

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A STRUGGLE FOR LIFE. Seed. They had a short time previously declared that we should <eac!water that night. My suspicions were therefore at once aroused, orrather my heart misgave me. Surely, I muttered to myself, the fel-lows are trying to deceive us, or they have lost their way ! The oneconjecture was as bad as the other. For a few seconds I remained 256 WONDERS OF THE TROPICS. silent; but, seeing them still wavering, I advanced, and in a voice tremtvling with rage and distress, thundered out, Where is the water, men ? adding, with my fowling-piece presented at the head of the acting guide, If you dont bring us to water before noon to-morrow, you die. Pro-ceed. It soon became obvious, however, that they had lost themselves, andthat, under such circumstances, threats would only tend still more toConfuse them. I consequently, as they were wandering to and fro likemen groping in the dark, and the night was fast closing upon us,sounded a halt to bivouac. That night was perhaps the mos

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Image from page 45 of “Book of the Royal blue” (1897)
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Identifier: bookofroyalblue24balt
Title: Book of the Royal blue
Year: 1897 (1890s)
Authors: Baltimore and Ohio railroad company. [from old catalog]
Subjects: Middle Atlantic States — Description and travel
Publisher: Baltimore
Contributing Library: The Library of Congress
Digitizing Sponsor: Sloan Foundation

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.00 from NHW YORK $ 9.00 from PHILADELPHIA $ 8.70 from CHELSTE^R $ 8.25 from WILMINGTON December 29, 1909, January 20, February 10,March 10, 23 and 31, April 14 and 28, May 28,1910 Secure illustrated itineraries and Guide to Washington fromany Baltimore & Ohio ticket agent in above-named cities. Book of the Royal Blue NOVEMBER, J909 CONTENTS Page International Live Stock Exposition, Chicago I The Origin of C Q D^ 3 North of Parallel Forty-nine—H. F. Baldwin 5 Florida and Cuba J3 Hunting Grounds of Maryland and West Virginia..17 Game Laws of United States and Canada J 8 Stub Ends of Thought — By Arthur G.Lewis 2t ILLUSTRATIONS International Live Stock Exposition J North of Parallel Forty-nine— Totem Pole at Fort Wrangel 4 C P. S. S. Princess May 5 On the Beautiful Columbia Coast 6 Totem Poles at Alert Bay 7 Map of Alaska 8 A Tropical Scene J3 In the Isle of Pines J4 The Omnipresent Palm 15 Wild Turkeys Abundant in West Virginia J 6 PRICE, 5 CENTS. 50 CENTS PER YEAR, -1 -J v^^

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Image from page 11 of “Smith’s hand-book and guide in Philadelphia : containing a general view of the city, its government, public buildings, educational, literary, ecclesiastical, scientific, and benevolent institutions, places of public amusements, rail
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Identifier: smithshandbookgu00phil
Title: Smith’s hand-book and guide in Philadelphia : containing a general view of the city, its government, public buildings, educational, literary, ecclesiastical, scientific, and benevolent institutions, places of public amusements, railroads, and routes from, and in the city, hotels, public parks, and cemeteries, and a new map
Year: 1871 (1870s)
Authors:
Subjects:
Publisher: Philadelphia : G. Delp
Contributing Library: The Library of Congress
Digitizing Sponsor: The Library of Congress

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Or, by addressing us or calling at our Salesroom, 914 Chestnut Street, Philadelphia. PETERSON & CARPENTER, GJENJERAZ AGENTS.

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so c LCeOi rd J-U. HALF-A-MIIXXON ^ OF WHEELER &. WILSON LOCKSTITCH winq i jsro-w IlsT USE. Any one desiring to purchase one of these inimitable Machines can heaccommodated by making application to ONE OF OUR TRAVELING SALESMEN;

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Image from page 53 of “Stephen of Philadelphia; a story of Penn’s colony” (1910)

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Identifier: stephenofphilade00otis
Title: Stephen of Philadelphia; a story of Penn’s colony
Year: 1910 (1910s)
Authors: Otis, James, 1848-1912
Subjects:
Publisher: New York, Cincinnati [etc.] American Book Company
Contributing Library: New York Public Library
Digitizing Sponsor: MSN

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, that the labor is very great, at least so it was toJethro and me by the time we had traveled three orfour miles. A LONG AND TIRESOME JOURNEY During a full day, which is to say from the time it wassufficiently light to see ones way through the forest,until the shadows of night had fully come, we walkedon snowshoes, oftentimes amid the underbrush where 46 STEPHEN OF PHILADELPHIA even the most experienced got ugly falls, owing to theawkward length of the shoes, with but two halts ofperhaps half an hour each. Long before word was given by the savage guidesthat we might make camp for the night, did I believeit would be impossible for me to take another stepbecause of weariness. Then a handful of Indian corn, roasted in the ashes,was given to each member of the party, and it seemedlike a pitiful amount after the plenty to which we hadbeen accustomed; but I found it right hearty. Onsuch small rations one felt much as if having partakenof a full meal; but on this night I gave little heed to

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the value of the food, because of my eyes being closedin slumber almost before my hunger had been satis-fied. When another day dawned, we were astir, but only A LONG AND TIRESOME JOURNEY 47 to find that two of the savages had disappeared, andwhile we were breaking our fast on cold roasted turkey,which we had brought with us from the settlement,there was much tongue-wagging regarding the absenceof the Indians. He who had been left behind did not know enoughwords in English to explain why his comrades had thusleft us, and when, two hours later, the seeming mysterywas solved, Jethro and I could have kicked each other,in our vexation, because of the useless labor we hadperformed. It appeared that the savages who guided us had novery clear idea of where the white mans canoe mightbe found; but believed that by following what theycalled a trail, it would be possible to come upon theship. As a matter of fact, however, we had gone down theriver many miles more than was necessary; for ourcampin

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Image from page 7 of “Glimpses of medical Europe” (1908)
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Identifier: glimpsesofmedica00thom
Title: Glimpses of medical Europe
Year: 1908 (1900s)
Authors: Thompson, Ralph L. (Ralph Leroy), 1872-
Subjects: Medicine Medicine Education, Medical Travel
Publisher: Philadelphia, London, J.B. Lippincott company
Contributing Library: Columbia University Libraries
Digitizing Sponsor: Open Knowledge Commons

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^-^J^^^ GLIMPSES OF MEDICAL EUROPE BYRALPH L. THOMPSON, M.D. Professor of Pathology,St. Louis University School of Medicine ILLUSTRATED FROM rilOTOGUAVnSAND FROM DRAWINGS BY TOM JONES PHILADELPHIA & LONDONJ. B. LIPPINCOTT COMPANY 1908 Copyright, 1908By J. B. LippiNCOTT Company Putdished April, 1908 Electrotyped and printed by J. B. Lippincott CompanyThe Washington Square Press, Philadelphia, V. S. A. TO K. W. M. INTRODUCTION. One who lays no claim to being a literaryman should not write a book to begin with.And of all subjects that might be chosen, abook on Europe is the one that most requiresan apology. However, I am not going toapologize for the present volume, because Ididnt want to write it, anyway. It began bymy sending home a few letters to an editorwho wanted to fill up a certain amount ofspace. Once started, it just naturally grewinto its present form. There has been no attempt at making thisbook a guide-book in any sense, althoughthings of importance to a man who is goingglimpsesofmedica00thom

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Image from page 254 of “Life of Kit Carson: the great western hunter and guide. Comprising wild and romantic exploits as a hunter and trapper in the Rocky Mountains; thrilling adventures and hairbreadth escapes among the Indians and Mexicans; his daring a
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Title: Life of Kit Carson: the great western hunter and guide. Comprising wild and romantic exploits as a hunter and trapper in the Rocky Mountains; thrilling adventures and hairbreadth escapes among the Indians and Mexicans; his daring and invaluable services as a guide to scouting and other parties, etc., etc. With an account of various government expeditions to the far West
Year: 1869 (1860s)
Authors: Burdett, Charles, b. 1815
Subjects: Carson, Kit, 1809-1868 Frontier and pioneer life
Publisher: Philadelphia, J. E. Potter and company
Contributing Library: The Library of Congress
Digitizing Sponsor: Sloan Foundation

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st entirely.In the course of the morning, we struck a footpath, which we were generally able to keep;and the ground was soft to our animals feet,being sandy or covered with mould. Greengrass began to make its appearance, and occa-sionally we passed a hill scatteringly coveredwith it. The character of the forest continuedthe same; and, among the trees, the pine withsharp leaves and very large cones was abund-ant, some of them being noble trees. Wemeasured one that had ten feet diameter,though the height was not more than one hun-dred and thirty feet. All along, the river wasa roaring torrent, its fall very great; and, de-scending with a rapidity to which we had longbeen strangers, to our great pleasure oak treesappeared on the ridge, and soon became veryfrequent; on these I remarked unusually greatquantities of misletoe. The opposite mountain side was very steepand continuous—unbroken by ravines, andcovered with pines and snow; while on theside we were traveling, innumerable rivulets

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*MY MOCCASIN GLANCED FROM THE ICY ROCK, AND PRECIPITATKDME INTO THE RIVER. LIFE OF CHRISTOPHER CARSC N. 241 poured down from the ridge. Continuing on,we halted a moment at one of these rivulets,to admire some beautiful evergreen trees, re-sembling live oak, which shaded the littlestream. They were forty to fifty feet high,and two in diameter, with a uniform tuftedtop; and the summer green of their beautifulfoliage, with the singing birds, and the sweetsummer wind which was whirling about thedry oak leaves, nearly intoxicated us with de-light ; and we hurried on, filled with excite-ment, to escape entirely from the horrid regionof inhospitable snow, to the perpetual springof the Sacramento. Fehruary 25.—Believing that the difiicul-ties of the road were passed, and leaving Mr.Fitzpatrick to follow slowly, as the conditionof the animals required, I started ahead thismorning with a party of eight, consisting (w^ithmyself) of Mr. Preuss, and Mr. Talbot, Car-son, Derosier, Towns, Proue, a

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Image from page 1186 of “The Street railway journal” (1884)

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Identifier: streetrailwayjo181901newy
Title: The Street railway journal
Year: 1884 (1880s)
Authors:
Subjects: Street-railroads Electric railroads Transportation
Publisher: New York : McGraw Pub. Co.
Contributing Library: Smithsonian Libraries
Digitizing Sponsor: Smithsonian Libraries

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fg. Co. H. W. Johns Mfg. Co. Okonite Co. Bethlehem Iron Co. Eugene Munsell & Co. Garton-Daniels Electric Co. McCardeU, West & Co. Robert W. BlackweU. Safety Third Rail Electric Co. Standard Air Brake Co. Dick, Kerr & Co. Risdon Iron Works. E. H. Cadiot & Co. Lorain Steel Co. Westinghouse Electric & Mfg. Co.General Electric Co.Jackson & Sharp Co.Peckham Truck Co.Baltimore Car Wheel Co.American Metal Co. Lewisohn Bros.Carnegie Steel Co.John Stephenson Co.Baldwin Locomotive Works.Brown Hoisting & Convejdng Machine Co.J. G. BriU Co. Christensen Engineering Co.Berlin Iron Bridge Co.B. F. Sturtevant Co.Riter-Conley Mfg. Co.Ball & Wood Co.A. L. Ide & Sons.Springfield Mfg. Co.Edwin Harrington Son & Co.J. A. Fay & Egan Co.Worthington Pump Co.Babcock & Wilcox Co.Westinghouse Alr-Brake Co.Manning, Maxwell & Moore. LIEBER CODE CO., 2 and 4 STONE STREET 20 BUCKLERSBURY, NEW YORK. LONDON, E.G. STREET RAILWAY JOURNAL. 239 ..Alw^yj* in Se&.son..

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SECTIONAL VIEW Aly/^yj* Ventile^ting DAY AND NIGHT RAIN OR SHINE Also VENTILATORS FOR EXPORT Power Houses and Buildings Ventilated AT LITTLE COST U/E have equipped Power Houses and Buildings all overthe world—suck as the KOLGOORLIE TRAMWAY CO., . . AustraliaST. CH.-RLES STREET RY. CO., . New OrleansGALVESTON CITY RY. CO., . Galveston, TexasPEEKSKILL LIGHTING & R.R. CO., Peekskill, N. YYOUNGSTOWN GAS & ELEC. CO., Youngstown, O. AND MANY OTHERS We luill be pleased to send you our new catalogue and sample andgive you an estimate. PANCOAST INTERNATIONAL VENTILATOR CO. manufacturers IMPROVED TAN-COAST VENTILATORSSalesroom and Office. 223 and 225 SOUTH FIFTH ST.. PHILADELPHIA Offices, NEW YORK and LONDON ELECTRIC MOTOR AND GENERATOR VENTILATING CO. 421 Chestnut Street, Philadelphia. Our new ventilator is a simple and efiicient device for carrying coldair direct to the motor case, fr< m the hood through hose under car. orfrom the funnel at top as may be preferrtd. Will vemilate

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Image from page 807 of “The Street railway journal” (1884)
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Identifier: streetrailwayjo291907newy
Title: The Street railway journal
Year: 1884 (1880s)
Authors:
Subjects: Street-railroads Electric railroads Transportation
Publisher: New York : McGraw Pub. Co.
Contributing Library: Smithsonian Libraries
Digitizing Sponsor: Smithsonian Libraries

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THE LIMA CAR HOUSE, WITH GATES BETWEEN THE TRACKS water which may accumulate in the pits,as there are no public drains and thereis no other way of accomplishing this.A large room is provided for the motor-men and conductors, and the office pro-vides ample space for the manager, elec-trical and civil engineers, traffic manager,accountant, cashier, etc. Adjoining thecar house is a house for the car housesuperintendent. The cars are of the eight-bench opentype, fully described in the Street Rail-way Journal of April 7, 1906. As thegovermnent requires the use of airbrakes, it was found necessary to placethe compressor under one end of theseats and the tank under the other. Thebrake cylinder is also placed under oneend of the car. The trucks are of thesolid steel Columbian type, 6 ft. 6 ins.wheel base. G. E. No. 54 double motorequipments are used on all these cars.

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Street Uy.Journal PLAN OF CAR HOUSE, SHOP AND OFFICE BUILDINGS May 4, 1907.] STREET RAILWAY JOURNAL. 795 At present there are forty-eight-bench cars, and in additiontwo sprinklers, two meat cars and a work car with derrick.The G. E. No. 80 double motor equipment is used on thelatter cars. Twenty additional eight-bench open cars havealready been ordered and will be re-quired as soon as received. The tramway system was designed bythe well-known American engineer, A.W. McLimont, who has also directedthe installation. The entire electricalequipment was supplied by the GeneralElectric Company; the open cars by theStephenson works of the J. G. Brill Com-pany, of Philadelphia; the trutks andspecial cars by the McGuire-CummingsCompany, of Chicago, and the poles,brackets, etc., by the Elmer P. MorrisCompany, of New York. All of theorders were placed through the firm ofW. R. Grace & Company, of New York. *^^ favor of a double-jointed current collector very similar tothat used on the same co

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Image from page 9 of “Ceremonies upon the completion of the monument erected by the Pennsylvania Railroad Company at Bordentown, New Jersey, to mark the first piece of track laid between New York and Philadelphia, 1831, November 12, 1891” (1891)
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Title: Ceremonies upon the completion of the monument erected by the Pennsylvania Railroad Company at Bordentown, New Jersey, to mark the first piece of track laid between New York and Philadelphia, 1831, November 12, 1891
Year: 1891 (1890s)
Authors: PENNSYLVANIA RAILROAD CO
Subjects: Camden and Amboy Railroad and Transportation Company
Publisher: Washington, D.C., William F. Roberts
Contributing Library: Smithsonian Libraries
Digitizing Sponsor: Smithsonian Libraries

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r R. R. and Transportation Co., 85 Philadelphia and Trenton R. R. Co., . . . . 87 89 ev Jersey Co., 90 New Jersey Controlled by Pennsylvania R. R. 91 from John Stevens Concerning Railroads in Pennsyl- 93 ts Concerning the Celebration, . . . . 95 ne of the Baltimore and Susquehanna R. R., . .101 ■ ILLUSTRATIONS..lent at Bordentown, . . Ceremonies and Program, He of Lei rt L. Stevens Ordering the First ig Cross Section and Plan, >inotive John Bull, lid Arch at Bordentown, and lahway and Jersey City, 1841, . Frontispiece facing page ii iv 6 2934 4244

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1 Ceremonies upon the Completion OF THE MS NUMENT ERECTED BY THE PENNSYLVANIA RAILROAD QO AT FjORDENTOWN, NEW JERSEY, TO MARK THE FIRST PIECE OFTRACK LAID BETWEEN NEWYORK AND PHILADELPHIA, I 83 I, November 12, 1891. PUBLISHED FOR THE PENNSYLVANIA RAILROAD CO. BY GEDNEV & ROBERTS, WASHINGTON, D. C.

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Image from page 62 of “Report of the General committee for the thirty-third national encampment of the Grand army of the republic and attendant reunions held at Philadelphia, September 4 to 9, 1899” (1900)

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Identifier: reportofgeneralc00phil
Title: Report of the General committee for the thirty-third national encampment of the Grand army of the republic and attendant reunions held at Philadelphia, September 4 to 9, 1899
Year: 1900 (1900s)
Authors: Philadelphia. General committee for the 33d national encampment, G. A. R., 1899. [from old catalog]
Subjects:
Publisher: Philadelphia, Printed by Allen, Lane & Scott
Contributing Library: The Library of Congress
Digitizing Sponsor: Sloan Foundation

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have been given in every instance. The Committee was enabled to secure the services of twofine bands without cost—that of Liberatti and the FairmountPark Band—both of which proved eminently satisfactory.Through the kindness of the United Singers Association andthe liberality of the Director of the DeiJartment of PublicSafety in assigning the Municipal Band for the purpose, avery flattering and successful inauguration of the weeksfestivities was had on Monday evening, September 4th, 1S99,in the serenade tendered the President of the United Statesat the Hotel Walton, the Commander-in-Chief of the G. A. E.at the Continental Hotel, and the Mayor of the city in thecourtyard of the City Hall. The entire success attending the grand chorus of publicschool children, composed of 3200 scholars and teachers, ledby Prof. Enoch W. Pearson, Director of Department of Musicof the Public Schools, on the grandstands erected on thenorth front of the City Hall, is a matter of especial gratifica- (40)

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tion to your Committee. The design of the three white key-stones imbedded in a groundwork of blue, containing lettersG. A. K. in red, respectively wrought out by the children,suitably garbed, was attractive and successful. The clear, sweet notes of their voices in harmonious vol-ume was thrilling and impressive, and we believe it will bethe one thing of lasting remembrance of the entire weekscelebration. The mass rehearsals in preparation for the eventwere held in Grace Baptist Church, Bethany Sunday-schoolroom and the Academy of Music without charge for the usethereof. We were also enabled to arrange with Prof. DavidD. Wood, Madame Emma Suelke, and the chorus of the Tem-ple, for a delightful concert at the Academy of Music onTuesday evening, September 5th, 1899, on the occasion ofthe official welcome to the National Encampment of theGrand Army of the Republic and kindred societies, whichwas greatly appreciated. In connection with the same, Mr. Henri Scott, of the choirof St. Stephens

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Image from page 26 of “Smith’s hand-book and guide in Philadelphia : containing a general view of the city, its government, public buildings, educational, literary, ecclesiastical, scientific, and benevolent institutions, places of public amusements, rail
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Title: Smith’s hand-book and guide in Philadelphia : containing a general view of the city, its government, public buildings, educational, literary, ecclesiastical, scientific, and benevolent institutions, places of public amusements, railroads, and routes from, and in the city, hotels, public parks, and cemeteries, and a new map
Year: 1871 (1870s)
Authors:
Subjects:
Publisher: Philadelphia : G. Delp
Contributing Library: The Library of Congress
Digitizing Sponsor: The Library of Congress

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d Glass Dealers, S. W. cor. Second & Green Streets, PHILADELPHIA. MATHEMATICAL INSTRUMENTS, Drawing Paper and Drawing Materials,SPECTACLES, MICROSCOPES, SPY GLASSES, OPERA GLASSES, Magic Lanterns and Pictures,PHILOSOPHICAL INSTRUMENTS, Made and Imported by JAMES W. QUEEN & CO., Iffo. 924 Chestnut St., PHILADELPHIA. Illustrated and Price Catalogues on application. g. 8. SITTER. A. L. CORSON. S. S. BITTER & CO., MANUFACTURERS OF Hitters Patent Truss, Of which he is Patentee and Sole Manufacturer,TRUSSES OF A.H,Ti ISI3ST1DS, Abdominal Supporters, Shoulder Braces, ELASTIC STOC2XCTOS, Ac. ALSO, MANUFACTURER OF MY PATENT TRUNK, Made out of Leather and Paste Board, without any seam. No. 727 Jayne Street,PHILADELPHIA. * ESTABLISHED 1851. J. REYNOLDS & SON, N. W. Gor. Thirteenth and Filbert Sts„ Philadelphia, Pa. 8ole Manufacturers of the Celebrated Wrought-Iron, Air-Tight, Ga$»C(MSUMtNG H.B&TBR, With Patent Dust Screen, Grate-Bar Rests, andWROUGHT-IRON RADIATOR. tr ©pi

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Theae Heaters are made of heavy wrought-lron, ■well rivetedtogether, the only sure prevention against the escape of gas or dust.They are easily managed, without any dampers. The Patent Radi-ator avoids the use and annoyance of drums, and is permanentlyattached to the Heater. This is the most durable, simple, economicaland popular Heating* Apparatus ever offered for sale. They areall guaranteed. COOKING RANGES, for Hotels and Families, PORTABLE HEATERS, 8LATE MANTELS, LATROBE HEATERS, REGISTERS, and LOW DOWN GRATES, VENTILATORS WB ARE ALSO MAS UFACTURTNQ A NEW FLAT-TOP HEATING RANGE, Jjjjf Send for our Illustrated Pamphlet. 2 W. H. BONER & CO. DEAIERS IX

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Image from page 73 of “Book of the Royal blue” (1897)

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Identifier: bookofroyalblue23balt
Title: Book of the Royal blue
Year: 1897 (1890s)
Authors: Baltimore and Ohio railroad company. [from old catalog]
Subjects: Middle Atlantic States — Description and travel
Publisher: Baltimore
Contributing Library: The Library of Congress
Digitizing Sponsor: Sloan Foundation

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ALL EXPENSES INCLUDED 1908-9Seven=Day Tours from BOSTON January 22, February 5 and 19, March 19, April 2, 3 (supplementary), 16 and 30, 1909 from NEW YORK January 23, February 6 and 20,March 20, April 3, 17 and 20, 1909 Three=Day Tours .00 from NILW YORK $ 9.00 from PHILADELPHIA $ 8.70 from CHESTER $ 8.25 from WILMINGTON December 28, 1908, January 21, February 11 and 20,March 11 and 25, April 5 and 15, May 6, 1909. Secure illustrated itineraries and Guide to Washington fromanv Baltimore & Ohio ticket agent in above-named cities.

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Taxicab Service New Union Station WASHINGTON, P. C 23d Street Terminal NEW YORK CITY Baltimore & Ohio R. R. TERMINALSTaxameter Tariff The Taxameter measures accurately the distance traveled and thewaiting time, and automatically computes, indicates and records theexact fare for the service rendered. The amount to be paid by the passenger is the sum of the figuresshown by the indicator marked Fare and by the indicator marked Extras. SINGLE TARIFF Distance—All Vehicles Initial charge (which pays for the first one-half mile or fraction thereof)… $ .30Each quarter mile thereafter 10 Waiting Landaulets, each six minutes •— $ -10 Hansom, Coupe, Brougham or Victoria, each ten minutes (only 60 cents an hour) 10 Extras—All Vehicles Trunk ■. ^ ■ ^0 For ordering a cab each mile or fraction thereof from stand or station to point ordered 20 One or Two Passengers Carried at the Above Rates in Washington, and from One to Five Passengers in New York All ferriage and bridge tolls, bo

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Image from page 71 of “Book of the Royal blue” (1897)
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Identifier: bookofroyalblue01balt
Title: Book of the Royal blue
Year: 1897 (1890s)
Authors: Baltimore and Ohio railroad company. [from old catalog]
Subjects: Middle Atlantic States — Description and travel
Publisher: Baltimore
Contributing Library: The Library of Congress
Digitizing Sponsor: Sloan Foundation

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h and Chestnut. Ar. New York 8.00 pm liberty Street. Ar.cwYork 8.10 pm 23d Street. SOUTHBOUND Lv. New York 3.50 pm 23d Street. Lv. New York 4.00 pm liberty Street. Lv. Philadelphia 6.12 pm 24th and Chestnut. Lv. Wilmington 6.44 pm Ar. Baltimore 8.09 pm Mt. Royal Station. Ar. Baltimore 8.13 pm Camden Station. Lv. Baltimore 8.16 pm Camden Station. Ar. Washington 9.00 pm New Union Station. Royal Blue Line PERSONALLY CONDUCTED TOURS TO WASHINGTON ALL EXPENSES INCLUDED (908-9Seven=Da.y Tours from BOSTON January 22, February 5 and 19, March 19, April 2,3 (supplementary!, 16 and 30, 1909 from NEW YORK January 23, February 6 and 20,March 20, April 3, 17 and 20, 1909 Three=DaLy Tours .00 from NE.W YORK $ 9.00 from PHILADELPHIA $ 8.70 from CHESTE.R $ 8.25 from WILMINGTON December 28, 1908, January 21, February 11 and 20,March 11 and 25, April 5 and 15, May 6, 1909. Secure illustrated itineraries and Guide to Washington fromany Baltimore & Ohio ticket agent in above-named cities.

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Taxicab Service New Union Station WASHINGTON, D. C 23d Street Terminal NEW YORK CITY Baltimore & Ohio R. R. TERMINALS Taxameter Tariff The Taxameter measures accurately the distance traveled and thewaiting time, and automatically computes, indicates and records theexact fare for the service rendered. The amount to be paid by the passenger is the sum of the figuresshown by the indicator marked Fare and by the indicator markedExtras. SINGLE TARIFF Distance—All Vehicles Waiting Landaulets, each six minutes Hansom. Coupe, Brougham or Victoria, each ten Extras—All Vehicles One or Two Passengers Carried at the Above Rates in Wasliington.and Irom One to Five Passengers in New Yorii ferriage and bridge tolls, both going and returning, mupaid by the passenger.

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Image from page 10 of “Smith’s hand-book and guide in Philadelphia : containing a general view of the city, its government, public buildings, educational, literary, ecclesiastical, scientific, and benevolent institutions, places of public amusements, rail
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Identifier: smithshandbookgu00phil
Title: Smith’s hand-book and guide in Philadelphia : containing a general view of the city, its government, public buildings, educational, literary, ecclesiastical, scientific, and benevolent institutions, places of public amusements, railroads, and routes from, and in the city, hotels, public parks, and cemeteries, and a new map
Year: 1871 (1870s)
Authors:
Subjects:
Publisher: Philadelphia : G. Delp
Contributing Library: The Library of Congress
Digitizing Sponsor: The Library of Congress

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V^t-< <■ C f HALF-A-

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OF WHEELER &. WILSON LOCKSTITCH 1N0 MACHIN nsrow msr use. Any one desiring to purchase one of these inimitable Machines can beAccommodated by making application to ONE OF OUR TRAVELING SALESMEN;

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