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Image from page 76 of “The Standard guide to Atlantic City, N.J. … contains complete information of interest to travelers regarding Atlantic City, New York, Philadelphia and Washington, D.C. ..” (1909)

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Image from page 76 of “The Standard guide to Atlantic City, N.J. … contains complete information of interest to travelers regarding Atlantic City, New York, Philadelphia and Washington, D.C. ..” (1909)
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Identifier: standardguidetoa00atla
Title: The Standard guide to Atlantic City, N.J. … contains complete information of interest to travelers regarding Atlantic City, New York, Philadelphia and Washington, D.C. ..
Year: 1909 (1900s)
Authors:
Subjects: Atlantic City (N.J.) — Guidebooks
Publisher: Atlantic City, N.J., Standard guide publishing co.
Contributing Library: The Library of Congress
Digitizing Sponsor: Sloan Foundation

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CHUTT, Mgr. WINTERFALLandSPRING SUMMER HOTEL RICHMOND I7th and H Streets. N. W. WASHINGTON, D. C. People who travel and stop in Washington, D. C, the most delightful cityin the world, will find accommodations comfortable, elegant and refined at HOTEL RICHMOND Around the corner from the White House 100 ROOMS – 50 BATHS Rates per day, European Plan, .50 and .00 With Bath, .50, .00 and .50 American Plan, .00 and .50 per day With Bath, .00, .50 and .00 Write for Booklet with Map ADIRONDACKS Seven hours from New York without changeLake Luzerne at the Gateway. Switzerland of America WAYSIDE INN and COTTAGES Luzerne Post Office – Warren County, New York 45 minutes from Saratoga Rates: Single, weekly, .50 up ; Double, .00 upRooms with private bath Suites of five rooms and bath Cottages 3 to 12 rooms with bath Write for Booklet CLIFFORD M. LEWIS, Proprietor When writing hotels please mention this Guide. Read inslrudions on pages 11 and 12. 72 THE QUE EN OF ALL RESORTS

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The New Varnum Hotel New Jersey Avenue and C Street, S. E.WASHINGTON, D. C. Overlooking United States Capitol and Congres-sional Library. Reopened under new management.Sunny Rooms, every one an outside one. PrivateBaths, Suites. Cuisine the very best. American Plan, 82.50 and upKuropean Plan, S1.50 and up Most cheerful and homelike hotel in Washington E. A. BENNETT, Proprietor HOTILL DRISCOLL NEWMODERN WASHINGTON, D. C.

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Image from page 208 of “Technology of textile design. Being a practical treatise on the construction and application of weaves for all textile fabrics, with minute reference to the latest inventions for weaving. Containing also an appendix showing the ana
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Identifier: technologyoftext1889poss2
Title: Technology of textile design. Being a practical treatise on the construction and application of weaves for all textile fabrics, with minute reference to the latest inventions for weaving. Containing also an appendix showing the analysis and giving the calculations necessary for the manufacture of the various textile fabrics
Year: 1889 (1880s)
Authors: Posselt, E. A. (Emanuel Anthony), 1858-1921
Subjects: Textile fabrics
Publisher: Philadelphia, Pub. by the author [etc.] London, S. Low, Marston, Searle & Rivington, limited
Contributing Library: Sterling and Francine Clark Art Institute Library
Digitizing Sponsor: Sterling and Francine Clark Art Institute Library

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Fig. 871. Fig. 872. opposite directions, to pull the carriage backward and forward transversely along the groovedguide-plate or race of the loom. A similar set of cords and a knife-carriage are provided foreach side of the loom, both knife-carriages moving in the same guide-plate alternately, each onlyabout half the distance across, and each alternating in its lateral travel from side to centre of therace-plate. Transversely across the frame of the loom are arranged two bars or rails, R and 5, theirrelative positions being as shown in Fig. 869, the former being merely a bar or rail supporting 204 the double pile fabric while it is being severed in two through the pile by the laterally-movingcutting-knives. Bar R is recessed near each of its ends (see Figs. 868 and 869) to admit of theinsertion and support therein of the housings for the sharpening-roUers, and so that the upper andlower sharpening-rollers shall come alternately in contact with the upper and lower sides, res-pectively,

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Image from page 172 of “Popular resorts, and how to reach them : combining a brief description of the principal summer retreats in the United States, and the routes of travel leading to them” (1875)
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Identifier: popularresortsho00bach
Title: Popular resorts, and how to reach them : combining a brief description of the principal summer retreats in the United States, and the routes of travel leading to them
Year: 1875 (1870s)
Authors: Bachelder, John B. (John Badger), 1825-1894
Subjects: Summer resorts
Publisher: Boston : John B. Bachelder
Contributing Library: University of Pittsburgh Library System
Digitizing Sponsor: Lyrasis Members and Sloan Foundation

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itor. The valleys are deep, the])recipices are bold and high, and the momitains steep. Even the watersrush with greater violence than in tamer countries. But the public will.soon understand this scenery better. The artists, the pioneers of pleas-ure travel, have already heard of it, and each year visit it in increasingnumbers. Soon the tide will set up this valley, hotels will be in demandto meet it. and the press will herald its praises. Persons residing in our large cities hardly realize how quickly and forhow small a sum these romantic places can be enjoyed. The morningtrain from New York or Philadelphia takes you to Mauch Chunk inseason for dinner, — dinner steaming hot at the Mansion House. The Switch-back and Glen Onoko can be visited in season to return atnight. l>»)l>lH-Ali KKSOUTS, AM) HOW H) IJKACII TIIIOM. 1.19 The subjoined description of the Nesoopec region is from LippincottsMagazine: — >• We walked about a half-mile along a wood-road, struck into a toot-

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PROSPECT ROCK.Nescopec Valley. path, andloll owed it a hun-dred yards or so,and without wam-ng walked ojit ona flat rock. fromwhich we could atfirst see nothingbut foq. u]). down,or around. It w^sa misty morning;but we made outto understand that we weremendous on theabyss; verge of a precipice, which fell sheer down into a tre-and when the fog lifted we looked out upon miles and 160 ^PILAR RESORTS. AXIl HOW TO liKACH THEM. miles of valleys, iiartly cleared, but principally covered with primevalforests. We were on Prospect Rock. Presently our guide took us by a romidabout way to Cloud Point.This is a commanding projection ou the other side of the glen; and herea still wider view — another, yet the same — lay before ns. There issomethiuti- indescribably oTand in the solitude of this sc-iif^. — forpsts

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Image from page 352 of “History of the counties of Dauphin and Lebanon : in the commonwealth of Pennsylvania ; biographical and genealogical” (1883)
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Identifier: historyofcountie00egle
Title: History of the counties of Dauphin and Lebanon : in the commonwealth of Pennsylvania ; biographical and genealogical
Year: 1883 (1880s)
Authors: Egle, William Henry, 1830-1901
Subjects:
Publisher: Philadelphia : Everts & Peck
Contributing Library: University of Pittsburgh Library System
Digitizing Sponsor: University of Pittsburgh Library System

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o-ope. There are many facts connected with the history ofinternal improvements in this locality which it willbe impossible within our prescribed limits to do littlemore than briefly refer to, and we shall present themas they occur to us in this connection. Very few per-sons have any idea of the difficulties of transporta-tion prior to the era of canals and railroads. Eighty-five or ninety years ago it was not an uncommonsight to see as many as five hundred pack-horses pass-ing the ferry here westward, loaded with merchan-dise, salt, iron, etc. The iron was carried on horse-back, being crooked over and around their bodies;barrels or kegs were hung on each side of these. Thepack-horses were generally led in divisions of twelveor fifteen horses, carrying about two hundred weighteach, going single file, and managed by two men, onegoing before as the leader, and the other in the rear,to see after the safety of the packs. Where the bridleroad passed along declivities or over hills, the path

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CITY OF HARRISBURG. 321 was in some places washed out so deep that the packsor burdens came in contact with the ground or otherimpeding obstacles, and were frequently displaced.However, as the carriers usually traveled in com-panies, the packs were soon adjusted, and no greatdelay occasioned. The pack-horses were generallyfurnished with bells, which were kept from ringingduring the day drive, but were loose at night, whenthe horses were set free, and permitted to feed andbrowse. The bells were intended as guides to directto their whereabouts in the morning. When thewagons were first introduced, the carriers consideredthat mode of transportation an invasion of theirrights. Their indignation was more excited, andthey manifested greater rancor than did the regularteamsters when the line of packets or railroad carscame into use about forty years afterwards. Fifty years ago the currency was eleven-penny-bits, fippenny-bits, and shillings,—eight shillings onedollar. Eight yards of calico

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Image from page 253 of “Book of the Royal blue” (1897)
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Identifier: bookofroyalblue24balt
Title: Book of the Royal blue
Year: 1897 (1890s)
Authors: Baltimore and Ohio railroad company. [from old catalog]
Subjects: Middle Atlantic States — Description and travel
Publisher: Baltimore
Contributing Library: The Library of Congress
Digitizing Sponsor: Sloan Foundation

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0.00 Weston, W. Va 9.05 West Alexander, Pa 10.00 West Newton, Pa 8.05 Wheeling, W.Va lO.OO Williamstown, W. Va. (via Parkers-burg) 10.75 No stop-overs will be permitted on going trip at any point en route. On tickets used to Baltimore, stop-over at Washington (without deposit of ticket) will be allowed on return trip, within final limit of ticket. Full details concerning time of trains, Pullman parlor and sleeping car accommodations, etc., will befurnished on application to ticket agents Baltimore & Ohio Railroad in above territory. Royal Blue Line PERSONALLY CONDUCTED TOURS TO WASHINGTON ALL EXPENSES INCLUDED 1910Seven=Day Tours from BOSTON April 8 and 22, May 6, 1910 from NEW YORK April 9 and 23 and May 7, 1910 Three=Day Tours .00 from NEIW YORK $ 9.00 from PHILADELPHIA $ 8.70 from CHE.STE,R $ 8.25 from WILMINGTON April 14 and 28, May 28,1910 Secure illustrated itineraries and Guide to Washington fromany Baltimore & Ohio ticket agent in above-named cities. mnraw®

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special Excursionsand Conventions—1910 Atlantic City, Cape May, Sea Isle City, Ocean City, N. J., OceanCity, Md., and Rehoboth Beach, Del. —East of the Ohio River,Special Low-Rate Excursions June 23d, July 7th and 21st, Aug^ust4th and i8th and September ist. Atlantic City—General Assembly Presbyterian Church in U. S. A.,May 18th to 31st.G. A. R. National Encampment, September igth to 24th. Baltimore, Md.—Southern Baptist Convention, May nth to 18th. Chicago, 111.—Knights Templar, Triennial Conclave, August 8th to 13th. Cincinnati, Ohio — General Federation Womens Clubs, May nthto 18th. New Orleans, La.—Ancient Arabic Order Nobles Mystic Shrine.Imperial Council, April 12th and 13th. Saratoga Springs, N. Y.—Baptist Young Peoples Union ofAmerica, International Convention, July 7th to loth. Washington, D. C—Worlds Sunday School Association, May19th to 26th. For full information as to rates, etc., apply at ticket offices Baltimore 6 Ohio Railroad Co.

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Image from page 208 of “Technology of textile design. Being a practical treatise on the construction and application of weaves for all textile fabrics, with minute reference to the latest inventions for weaving. Containing also an appendix showing the ana
philadelphia travel guide
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Identifier: technologyoftext1889poss2
Title: Technology of textile design. Being a practical treatise on the construction and application of weaves for all textile fabrics, with minute reference to the latest inventions for weaving. Containing also an appendix showing the analysis and giving the calculations necessary for the manufacture of the various textile fabrics
Year: 1889 (1880s)
Authors: Posselt, E. A. (Emanuel Anthony), 1858-1921
Subjects: Textile fabrics
Publisher: Philadelphia, Pub. by the author [etc.] London, S. Low, Marston, Searle & Rivington, limited
Contributing Library: Sterling and Francine Clark Art Institute Library
Digitizing Sponsor: Sterling and Francine Clark Art Institute Library

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rs mounted in theirframe with a portion of the velvet rail or cutting bar. Fig. 869 is a top-view of the transversely grooved guide-plate or race-bar in which theknife-carriages are reciprocated, and the parallel supporting-bar in which the fabric is cut by thelaterally-traveling knives. Fig. 870 is an enlarged view of the parts at one end of Fig. 869, showing the transverselygrooved race-bar, a knife-carriage with its knife, and the stopping mechanism in the race-bar. 203 Fig. 871 is a cross-section view of the velvet delivery rollers, one of the pile severing- knives,and the supporting bars, showing the relative position of these several parts. Fig. 872 is a transverse section of the inside of that part of the loom shown in Fig. 865 fromthe outside. Fig. 873 is a transverse sectional view of the loom, showing the location and arrangementof the crank-shaft and connecting-gear, one of the pulley-wheels, and the sharpening mechanismwith its actuating mechanism for one of the knives. ^C

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Image from page 322 of “Book of the Royal blue” (1897)
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Identifier: bookofroyalblue13balt
Title: Book of the Royal blue
Year: 1897 (1890s)
Authors: Baltimore and Ohio railroad company. [from old catalog]
Subjects: Middle Atlantic States — Description and travel
Publisher: Baltimore
Contributing Library: The Library of Congress
Digitizing Sponsor: Sloan Foundation

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ial Freight Agent Akron, O. E. N. Kendall, Commercial Freight Agent Toledo, O. John Hutchings, Commercial Freight Agent, Detroit, Mich. C. II. Harkins, Commercial Freight Agent Chicago, III. C. H. Ross. Commercial Freight Agent Milwaukee, Wis. Thos. Miles, Commercial Frt. Agent Minneapolis. Minn. H. C.Piculell, Commercial Freight Agent Omaha, Neb. M. J. Allen, Commercial Freight Agent Denver, Col. J. J.Collzbter. Commercial Freight Agent. Kansas City, Mo. J. E. Galbraith, General Agent Cleveland, O. Peter Harvey, Genera] Agent, Room 1. Hobart Building, San Francisco. Cal. Alex. Hollander A- Co.. Import Agents New York. T. H. Noonan, Gen. Manager Continental Line and Central States Despatch, Cincinnati, O. MILEAGE. NEW YORK DIVISION 5.30 PHILADELPHIA DIVISION AND BRANCHES 129.42 MAIN LINE AND BRANCHES 949 98 PITTSBURG DIVISION AND BRANCHES 403.08 TOTAL MILEAGE EAST OF OHIO RIVER . MIDDLE AND NORTHWESTERN DIVISIONS 790.19 TOTAL MILEAGE WEST OF OHIO RIVER TOTAL MILEAGE OF SYSTEM 1,487.78

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ArtisticPublications issued by the Baltimore & Ohio R. R. Guide To Washington. The Passenger Department of the Balti-more & Ohio R. R. has issued a Guide toWashington, which in many respects excelsall other guides published, both in artistic ap-pearance and careful description of points ofinterest in the Capital City. The front coverof the book is embellished with a handsomesteel engraved portrait of the Stuart Wash-ington. The reverse cover bears an Americanflag in the grasp of an eagle. The insidepages contain recent photographs of all of theGovernment Buildings with correct informa-tion concerning them, together with otherinteresting features of the city, and the verylatest map. Copies will be sold at the princi-pal Ticket Offices of the Baltimore & Ohio R. R.for ten (10) cents cash, or will be mailed toany address on receipt of fifteen (15) cents instamps, on application to the undersigned. Reasons Why. Reasons Why is a forty-two page pamphletgiving in condensed form t

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Image from page 170 of “Wonders and curiosities of the railway; or, Stories of the locomotive in every land” (1884)
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Identifier: wonderscuriositi01kenn
Title: Wonders and curiosities of the railway; or, Stories of the locomotive in every land
Year: 1884 (1880s)
Authors: Kennedy, William Sloane, 1850-1929
Subjects: Railroads
Publisher: Chicago, S.C. Griggs and Company
Contributing Library: The Library of Congress
Digitizing Sponsor: The Library of Congress

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, architect; Paran Stevens, Hiram Hitchcock, andothers, lessees). An exactly similar screw elevator wassoon after put into the Continental Hotel in Philadelphia —a hotel also leased to Paran Stevens. These two machineswere the only screw elevators for passengers ever con-structed. People would not at first be-lieve a vertical railway a possiblething. Mr. Hiram Hitchcock, thepresent proprietor of the hotel,says, in a private letter to thewriter, that hundreds, eventhousands, of persons visited theelevator daily. Men of note suchas the Prince of Wales, the Princede Joinville, and others, as well aseminent foreign engineers andscientific persons, were greatly in-terested in it. The object of theinventor was to produce a machinewhich should be perfectly safe, andhe succeeded in doing so. Thescrew consisted of a great solidiron shaft twenty ^__.,^^^_.inches in diam-etei% and cast insections. It ex-tended to the topof the building,and was not en-closed in any THE FIRST PASSENGER ELEVATOR.

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150 WOKDEES AND CURIOSITIES OF THE RAILWAY. hoistway. A linge iron nut with screws encircled the shaft.Within the nut were rollers running upon the upper sideof the thread of the shaft screw. In the language of theinventor, The rollers were virtually carriage-wheels travel-ling upon a rail wound spirally along a cylinder. Uponthe nut rested the car. The nut did not turn round, beingprevented from doing so by a spur attached to it, andmoving vertically with it along one of the guide rails.When the shaft was rotated the rollers inside the nut woundupward around the great spiral thread of the shaft, andthus by a continuous movement elevated the nut, and thecar with it. A slot in the nut enabled it to pass by thestays that held the shaft to the wall. The car was squareand closed. The governing rope passed through the car.There was an automatic stop, a friction brake, automaticallyclosing doors, a fluid retarder, and a second set of rollerstravelling directly upon the body of the cylindric

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Image from page 20 of “The British Isles : a guide for overseas visitors, taking in the American pilgrim shrines, the principal show-places and other famed for their history, beauty, or literary associations” (1900)
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Identifier: britishislesguid00lond
Title: The British Isles : a guide for overseas visitors, taking in the American pilgrim shrines, the principal show-places and other famed for their history, beauty, or literary associations
Year: 1900 (1900s)
Authors:
Subjects:
Publisher: London : E.J. Burrow
Contributing Library: University of California Libraries
Digitizing Sponsor: Internet Archive

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e wall a little to the rightis a tablet bearing in Latin the famous epitaph— Lector,si monument urn reqiiiris circumspice. (Reader, if thouseekest his monument look around.) The group of statuary in front of the western entrance,which forms a monument to Queen Anne, is of more thanpas.sing interest. It is a replica of an original by FrancisBird, set up in 1712, and the four emblematic figuressurrounding the plinth represent England, France, Irelandand the American colonies. The representation of Francein the capacity of a British dominion was an unwarrantedas.sumption, for our last possession in that country was lostone hundred and fifty years and more before the erectionof the monument. The Indian girl representing theAmerican colonies has more justification, but became outof date at the Declaration of Independence in 1776. A short distance away is the ancient church of St.Ethelburga in Bi.shopsgate, dating back in part to thefifteenth C(>nturv. It was here that Henry Hudson and

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ST. PAULS CATHEDRAL. AMERICAN PILCiRIM SHRINES IN LONDON. liis crew of ten partook of Holy Communion on April 19th,1607, four davs before leaving in the Hopeful on hisvain endeavour to find a passage to China and Japan viathe North Polar Seas. It is perhaps unnecessary to mentionthat it was Hendrick, as he was called by the Dutch settlers, who dis-covered the HudsonRiver on one of hisvoyages, and exploredit as far as Albany.Travelling stillfurther east, we cometo Barking, wdth itsfine old church, main-ly a 14th centurybuilding and one ofthe few to escape theGreat Fire of 1666.Its tower, however,was erected in the 17thcentury. Its registerrecords that WilliamPenn, founder of ({W ^^^ :^<^^y-j! Wfl^^ Philadelphia andJ ;;^L(n;.—i%,h – -^ W K, Pennsylvania, who was born in 1644 ina house on Tower Hill,was christened here.A bronze tablet tohis memory wasplaced in the churchin 1911 by the Penn-sylvania Society ofNew York. Here, too, John Quincy Adams, Presidentof the United States, w

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Image from page 163 of “Textile calculations: being a guide to calculations relating to the construction of all kinds of yarns and fabrics” (1896)
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Identifier: textilecalculati01poss
Title: Textile calculations: being a guide to calculations relating to the construction of all kinds of yarns and fabrics
Year: 1896 (1890s)
Authors: Posselt, Emanuel Anthony, 1858-
Subjects: Textile industry
Publisher: Philadelphia, E. A. Posselt
Contributing Library: The Library of Congress
Digitizing Sponsor: Sloan Foundation

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PHILADELPHIA, PA., fc Manufacturers of FOR WORKING IRON . . AND STEEL O O ]V£ACHINE TOOLS High Speed Traveling Cranes and Swing Cranes. Shafting,Pulleys,Hangers, hko. Couplings,

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Etc., Estimates Furnished for Work Deliveredat flill and Erected in Position Ready for the Belts. Mechanical The VICARS Stokers For Automatically Feeding Fuel to Boilers, = = = – – . – with entire absence of Smoke. Improved Injectors, Turntables, Testing Machines, Etc. ADVERTISEMENT. George Draper & Sons

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Image from page 81 of “The Standard guide to Atlantic City, N.J. … contains complete information of interest to travelers regarding Atlantic City, New York, Philadelphia and Washington, D.C. ..” (1909)
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Identifier: standardguidetoa00atla
Title: The Standard guide to Atlantic City, N.J. … contains complete information of interest to travelers regarding Atlantic City, New York, Philadelphia and Washington, D.C. ..
Year: 1909 (1900s)
Authors:
Subjects: Atlantic City (N.J.) — Guidebooks
Publisher: Atlantic City, N.J., Standard guide publishing co.
Contributing Library: The Library of Congress
Digitizing Sponsor: Sloan Foundation

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icularly when visiting strange resortsand places for the first time. Sightseeing trips in each one of the above cities may be added and in-cluded in itinerary of tour at a small additional expense. We will be pleased to advise anyone on request as to the lowest ratesfor transportation, which will be included in the price of tour when desired.To parties of ten or more travelling together, reduced rates of fare are granted.To parties of one hundred or more, we can furnish a special private train forthe exclusive use of party, and arrange for stop-overs at any place enroutedesired The New England Resorts and Travelers Information Bureau,1180 Broadway, New York, is our special representative in New York whereresidents of New York and travelers may call for information and our litera-ture. All correspondence should be addressed to our Atlantic City Office.For full particulars, address THE ATLANTIC CITY TOURIST AGENCY 10 South New York Avenue ATLANTIC CITY, N. J. 77 ATLANTIC CITY NEW JERSEY

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FROM THE COMMERCIAL MUSEUM PHILADELPHIA THE CITY OF BROTHERLY LOVE

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Image from page 102 of “A trip to the Orient; the story of a Mediterranean cruise” (1907)
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Identifier: triptoorientstor00jacorich
Title: A trip to the Orient; the story of a Mediterranean cruise
Year: 1907 (1900s)
Authors: Jacob, Robert Urie
Subjects: Middle East — Description and travel
Publisher: Philadelphia, The J. C. Winston co
Contributing Library: University of California Libraries
Digitizing Sponsor: MSN

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e month. The heavy doors were open, but a curtainof matting hung over the entrance. A ragged, barefootboy ran before us, and, drawing aside the matting thatwe might enter, extended his hand for a penny. Wewalked over the beautiful inlaid mosaic marble floor,and beheld handsomely painted ceilings with life-sizefigures overhead, and richly decorated walls and pillarsaround us. A priest with pride pointed out the famouspaintings on the walls, the bronze and the marblestatues around the sides, and, in the various chapels,the three huge iron keys which opened the gates ofJerusalem, Acre, and Rhodes, and the gates of solidsilver in front of the richly decorated altar. As westood before the silver gates our guide told us his littlestory: When the French captured Malta in 1798 theycarried away as bootv the most valuable possessions ofthe church in the form of precious jewels, silver statues,golden vessels, valuable vestments, and works of art.The Emperor Napoleon with his own hand took a most

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< Htnw u W HO QWU u Q H < O UW as Hc« U (91) 92 A TRIP TO THE ORIENT. valuable diamond from the finger of the jeweled glovewhich covered the sacred relic, the hand of St. John, andplaced it on his own finger. The Emperor also tookthe diamond mounted sword, which had been carriedby Valette, and buckled it to his side. These silvergates, too, would have been carried away but for theforethought of a priest who painted them black and soconcealed their value. In the nave of this church we tramped over hundredsof marble slabs which have been placed among themosaics in the floor as memorials of the knights andnobles who are buried underneath. These flat tomb-stones are adorned with representations of coats-of-arms, musical instruments, angels, crowns, palms,skeletons, and other odd devices. But in the cryptunderneath, whither we were next conducted, majesticmonuments of elaborate design mark the restingplaces of the most noted Grand Masters of the Order,the tomb of Grand M

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Image from page 87 of “A trip to the Orient; the story of a Mediterranean cruise” (1907)
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Identifier: triptoorientstor00jacorich
Title: A trip to the Orient; the story of a Mediterranean cruise
Year: 1907 (1900s)
Authors: Jacob, Robert Urie
Subjects: Middle East — Description and travel
Publisher: Philadelphia, The J. C. Winston co
Contributing Library: University of California Libraries
Digitizing Sponsor: MSN

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slight breeze, kept up a continualcreaking sound. Huge trees, whose wide-spreadingbranches were supported by scores of accessory trunks,so that each tree formed a grove of its own,we recognizedas banyan trees. In one part of the garden, windingpaths led through a tangled tropical growth so denseand wild that one felt as if in the midst of an Africanjungle where a tiger might spring forth or a boa con-strictor drop down on ones head. On the heights to the east, in the favorite modernresidential district, called Mustapha Superieur, manylarge white stone hotels and apartment houses weresituated amid gardens of glossy-leaved orange and lemontrees. Palms, plane, and pepper trees lined the clean,wide avenues; ereen terraces beautified the hillside 76 A TRIP TO THE ORIENT. gardens; and villas were almost hidden from sight by theclimbing roses and luxuriant vines with clusters ofpurple racemes. Many of these villas, said the guide, are owned bywealthy English and French families who spend the

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THE ENTRANCE TO A NARROW STREET. winters here. The mild climate and uniform tempera-ture of our city makes this place a favorite winter resortnot only for invalids, but for those who desire to getaway from the damp fogs and harsh winds of more north-ern climates. THE CITY OF ALGIERS. 77 Our city is noted for two views which we think areunsurpassed, he continued, as the driver reined in histeam on a summit. One is this which we now lookdown upon of city, harbor, sea, and villages near anddistant along the shore. The other, you already haveseen from the deck of the vessel, yet at sunsetyou will find that panorama of the city, villages, heightsand mountains even more beautiful. While we were exploring the city, the officers on thesteamer were engaged in directing the taking on of freshsupplies of coal, water, and provisions, which had beenpurchased at Algiers. During the two days the Moltkelay in the harbor fifteen hundred tons of coal werecarried in baskets on the shoulders of Arabs fro

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Image from page 207 of “Technology of textile design. Being a practical treatise on the construction and application of weaves for all textile fabrics, with minute reference to the latest inventions for weaving. Containing also an appendix showing the ana
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Identifier: technologyoftext1889poss2
Title: Technology of textile design. Being a practical treatise on the construction and application of weaves for all textile fabrics, with minute reference to the latest inventions for weaving. Containing also an appendix showing the analysis and giving the calculations necessary for the manufacture of the various textile fabrics
Year: 1889 (1880s)
Authors: Posselt, E. A. (Emanuel Anthony), 1858-1921
Subjects: Textile fabrics
Publisher: Philadelphia, Pub. by the author [etc.] London, S. Low, Marston, Searle & Rivington, limited
Contributing Library: Sterling and Francine Clark Art Institute Library
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Fig. 866. Fig. 867. Fig. 868 is, partly, a sectional front-view of a pair of the sharpening-rollers mounted in theirframe with a portion of the velvet rail or cutting bar. Fig. 869 is a top-view of the transversely grooved guide-plate or race-bar in which theknife-carriages are reciprocated, and the parallel supporting-bar in which the fabric is cut by thelaterally-traveling knives. Fig. 870 is an enlarged view of the parts at one end of Fig. 869, showing the transverselygrooved race-bar, a knife-carriage with its knife, and the stopping mechanism in the race-bar. 203 Fig. 871 is a cross-section view of the velvet delivery rollers, one of the pile severing- knives,and the supporting bars, showing the relative position of these several parts. Fig. 872 is a transverse section of the inside of that part of the loom shown in Fig. 865 fromthe outside. Fig. 873 is a transverse sectional view of the loom, showing the location and arrangementof the crank-shaft and connecting-gear, one of the

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Image from page 80 of “A trip to the Orient; the story of a Mediterranean cruise” (1907)
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Identifier: triptoorientstor00jacorich
Title: A trip to the Orient; the story of a Mediterranean cruise
Year: 1907 (1900s)
Authors: Jacob, Robert Urie
Subjects: Middle East — Description and travel
Publisher: Philadelphia, The J. C. Winston co
Contributing Library: University of California Libraries
Digitizing Sponsor: MSN

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ut offchunks and slices in order to give the exact weightwanted by customers. The beggars did not trouble us very much by theirimportunities, although they were to be seen everywherein filth and rags. Street peddlers, however, were per-sistent in offering wares and trinkets for sale, and brightArab boys, who had learned a few sentences of Englishran after us offering their services as guides. The coffee shops which we saw while passing throughthe streets were as numerous in Algiers as beer saloonsin an American city. As the Mohammedan religionforbids the use of alcoholic liquors, the Arab followersof Mahomet appeared to be satisfying their cravingfor stimulants by drinking strong black coffee and by THE CITY OF ALGIERS. 69 drinking it often. In the cafes, which are open infront, allowing all that goes on inside to be visible fromthe street, and on the benches outside the shops, wesaw the customers sitting crosslegged slowly imbibingthis favorite beverage from tiny cups. It was plainly

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ON FRIDAYS THE WOMEN VISIT THE CEMETERY. apparent that in this warm climate where there is nohaste, numberless hours are dreamed away on thebenches of these cafes. When we left the modern part of the city and ascendedthe avenues which lead up the hill toward the older 70 A TRIP TO THE ORIENT. portion we found the streets diminishing in width untilthey were only passageways from six to ten feet wide,bordered by high buldings with blank walls showing nowindows below, but with projecting windows abovewhich almost meet overhead. In some of these steep,narrow, crooked streets there are little shops aboutthe size of a large closet in which the merchant, sittingcrosslegged on bench or cushion, can reach his goodsand wait on his customer without rising or interferingwith the enjoyment of his pipe. As the narrow thorough-fares are not wide enough for carriages, we had to walkthrough them with a guide. We were not favorablyimpressed with the odors nor with the sight of the filthin the streets a

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Image from page 139 of “Eight journeys abroad” (1917)
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Identifier: eightjourneysabr00rose
Title: Eight journeys abroad
Year: 1917 (1910s)
Authors: Rosengarten, Mary D. Richardson, 1846-1913 Rosengarten, Frank H
Subjects: Europe — Description and travel Algeria — Description and travel Palestine — Description and travel Egypt — Description and travel
Publisher: Philadelphia : printed for private circulation by J.B. Lippincott Co.
Contributing Library: Columbia University Libraries
Digitizing Sponsor: MSN

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a castle on top of the hilloverlooking the river, but it proved to be a Court House andjail, and we got into conversation with the old keeper who wassitting out in front. Father talked with him about the connec-tion of Scotland and England, and there was an old man sittingnext to him who kept whispering to the jailer to tell father thatScotland was an unconquered country, that they had neverbeen conquered. At Inverness we took the Caledonian Canal to this place, travelling in a small steamboat. We passed through several beautiful lakes, Loch Ness, Loch Oich, and Loch Lochy, as- 124 SCOTLAND cending and descending from each by means of locks, dur-ing which operation we got out and took several walks.The scenery is certainly very beautiful, and the mountainsare even grand, though the highest, Ben Nevis, is not 4500ft. in height, but they are mostly destitute of vegetationand indented by deep fissures which give them a very wild andrugged appearance. We made only one excursion during the

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THE CALEDONIAN CANAL, THE WATER JOURNEY ACROSS SCOTLAND day (and for that the boat waited for us) to see the Falls of Foyers, which are very celebrated. The guide book tells us they consist of two cataracts, but it has been very dry here for a long time and consequently we saw only one, a very small affair. I can imagine though that it might be very pretty, when there is a full volume of water, which by the way is of the same peculiar amber color as that of the Falls of Montmorency. 125 EIGHT JOURNEYS ABROAD Banavie, Scotland, August 8th. 1870. We are in a charming hotel here, commanding a fine viewof Ben Nevis and the Braes of Lochaber. Charley Greeleymade the ascent of the mountain yesterday morning. Theysay it is a very dangerous mountain, there are so many preci-pices. Charley came very near going over one he came uponunawares, but the guide called to him and he fell back immedi-ately and saved himself. Some man went up from Fort Will-iam the night before and has not been heard of

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Image from page 6 of “A trip to the Orient; the story of a Mediterranean cruise” (1907)
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Identifier: triptoorientstor00jacorich
Title: A trip to the Orient; the story of a Mediterranean cruise
Year: 1907 (1900s)
Authors: Jacob, Robert Urie
Subjects: Middle East — Description and travel
Publisher: Philadelphia, The J. C. Winston co
Contributing Library: University of California Libraries
Digitizing Sponsor: MSN

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207385 i.il mil II il * i

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ILLUSTRATED THE JOHN C. WINSTON CO. PHILADELPHIA OF THE UNIVERSITY OF 3 ^ Copyright 1907, byRobert Urie Jacob. Half-tones made byThe Photo-Chromotype Engraving Co.Philadelphia, Pa. PREFACE. k Trip to the Orient, the Story of a MediterraneanJY Cruise, by Robert Urie Jacob, has been writtenat the request of fellow-travelers who did nothave time to take notes by the way. One said, Do not write a guide book nor a love story,but a simple narrative that will recall the incidents anddelightful experiences of the tour. Following thesesuggestions, but with many misgivings, the author hasundertaken and completed the work, assisted in theediting and proof-reading by Miss Ruth Collins, of theDrexel Institute, and by Miss Anna C. Kauffman. An interesting feature of the book is the large numberof illustrations made from artistic photographs, all ofwhich have been kindly contributed by amateur photog-raphers. It contains nearly two hundred illustrations ofviews or incidents in Funchal, Granada, A

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Image from page 240 of “Recollections of an ill-fated expedition to the headwaters of the Madeira River in Brazil” (1907)
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Identifier: recollectionsofi00crai
Title: Recollections of an ill-fated expedition to the headwaters of the Madeira River in Brazil
Year: 1907 (1900s)
Authors: Craig, Neville B., 1847-1926 Madeira and Mamoré Association
Subjects: Madeira-Mamoré Railway Mercedita (Ship) Collins Expedition (1878-1879) Brazil — Description and travel
Publisher: Philadelphia & London : J.B. Lippincott
Contributing Library: Brown University Library
Digitizing Sponsor: Brown University

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ft, brought the cut-off valve stem in contact withthe link, breaking the guides for the cut-off, bendingthe valve stem and two eccentric rods and twisting thereverse rod (Lawford). Just here I wish to add another charge to Mr. D es account. We have discovered, in repairing, that the key which causedthe trouble never fitted in its place, having originally,at the shop, been made too small and lined up with apiece of tin (Lawford). It was an outrageous pieceof work. ^I called Mr. Bellvou, chief engineer, to the cap-tain s room and received the following: ^ The key to thecut-off cam came out, broke the guides for the cut-off,and bent the valve stem and eccentric rods. The causeof the trouble was that the key was too loose and neverfitted right. I put in four pieces of scrap tin and yetit wouldnt hold in its place. The fault was in thebuilding of the engine. This is a verbatim report ofthe explanation offered and to it was added the furtherstatement that ^This cam drives the feed pump, air

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AN ILL-FATED EXPEDITION 201 pump, circulating pump and independent cut-off. Weheard a terrific crashing, hammering and jumping inthe engine room and rushed down to find the abovedescribed condition of the machinery. There weresome seriously expressive faces looking at each otheras each one seemed to mentally accept the terrible sit-uation that threatened to confront us in case the breakcould not be repaired. Out of drinking water, twohundred miles from the nearest land, out of the trackof vessels, our sails about as much use as a fifth wheelto a wagon and no other motive power, truly a des-perate state of affairs! One member of the firm sug-gested to me before leaving that if anything wentwrong with the engine we could sail into port. Groodheavens! Unless in a gale of wind on her quarter, shecould not make twenty miles a day. We had a strongwind blowing when the accident occurred. We headedher to make it a beam wind and she made by the logjust about half a mile in two hours. The sails

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Image from page 228 of “Man upon the sea : or, a history of maritime adventure, exploration, and discovery, from the earliest ages to the present time …” (1858)
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Identifier: manuponseaorhist00good
Title: Man upon the sea : or, a history of maritime adventure, exploration, and discovery, from the earliest ages to the present time …
Year: 1858 (1850s)
Authors: Goodrich, Frank B. (Frank Boott), 1826-1894
Subjects: Discoveries in geography Voyages and travels
Publisher: Philadelphia : J.B. Lippincott & co.
Contributing Library: Boston Public Library
Digitizing Sponsor: Boston Public Library

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e transfixed with lances, others hewndown with swords, and others torn to pieces by the bloodhounds.He advanced hardly seven miles a day, but at last reached a 205 village lying at the foot of the mountain that commanded thelong wished for prospect. Only sixty-seven men out of twohundred remained to make this last grand effort. Balboaordered them to retire early to repose, that they might be readyat the cool hour of dawn. They set forth at daybreak on themorning of the 26th of September. In a short time theyemerged from the forests, and arrived at the upper regions ofthe mountain, leaving the bald summit still to be ascended.Balboa ordered them to halt, that he might himself be aloneto enjoy the scene and the first to discover the ocean. Hereached the peak, and there the magnificent sight burst upon hisview. The water was still at the distance of two days journey ;but there it lay, beyond the intervening space, grand, bound-less, and serene. He fell upon his knees, and returned thanks

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BALBOA DISCOVERING THE PACIFIC OCEAN. to God. He summoned his followers to ascend, and thus ad-dressed them:—Behold, my friends, he said, the glorioussight which we have so ardently longed for. Let us pray toGod that he will aid and guide us to conquer the sea and landwhich we have discovered, and in which no Christian has everentered to preach the holy doctrine of the Evangelists. By thefavor of Christ you will thus become the richest Spaniards thathave ever come to the Indies. The priest attached to theexpedition chanted that impressive anthem, the Te Deum; andthe Spaniards, in whom religious fervor and the thirst for pillage 206 MAN UPON THE SEA. seemed to be mingled in equal proportions, joined in the choruswith heart and voice. Balboa now called upon all present to witness that he tookpossession of the sea, its islands and surrounding lands, in thename of the sovereigns of Castile; and the notary of the expe-dition made a record to that effect, to which all present, to thenumbe

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Image from page 65 of “A trip to the Orient; the story of a Mediterranean cruise” (1907)
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Identifier: triptoorientstor00jacorich
Title: A trip to the Orient; the story of a Mediterranean cruise
Year: 1907 (1900s)
Authors: Jacob, Robert Urie
Subjects: Middle East — Description and travel
Publisher: Philadelphia, The J. C. Winston co
Contributing Library: University of California Libraries
Digitizing Sponsor: MSN

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forced his head over theedge of this basin, and the sharp simitar of the execu-tioner showed no mercy. This was the kings revenge,and so the stains on the fountain. The Room of Two Sisters brought forth exclamationsof praise. Walls covered with dainty traceries in plas-ter, like embroideries on a ground of lace work; dadosbrilliant in fantastic designs of red, green, and blue;ceilings dropping thousands of stalactites each differingfrom the others in beauty of form; and charming viewsfrom the boudoir windows of floral beds and fountainsin the garden beyond,—all these combined to makethis place a suitable residence for a Queen. 54 A TRIP TO THE ORIENT. In the Baths we saw where royalty had bathed inmarble basins to the sound of music by players in thegallery overhead. Here are the rooms which Washington Irving oc-cupied in the Alhambra during his stay in Granada,explained the guide. Some of us tried to recall Irvings graphic descriptionsin the Conquest of Granada of the scenes around

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THE SUMMER RESIDENCE OF THE MOORISH KINGS. this city; of the struggles between the Christian knightsunder the banner of Ferdinand, and the Moorish cava-liers under the standard of Mahomet; of fields coveredwith silken canopies; of cavalcades of warriors injeweled armor and nodding plumes; of hand-to-hand

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Image from page 215 of “The American sportsman: containing hints to sportsmen, notes on shooting, and the habits of the game birds and wild fowl of America” (1857)
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Identifier: americansportsma00lewi
Title: The American sportsman: containing hints to sportsmen, notes on shooting, and the habits of the game birds and wild fowl of America
Year: 1857 (1850s)
Authors: Lewis, Elisha J. (Elisha Jarrett), 1820-1877
Subjects: Shooting Game and game-birds Firearms Hunting
Publisher: Philadelphia, J. B. Lippincott & Co.
Contributing Library: Smithsonian Libraries
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weather. This statement, although a little overdrawn, is not far wide ofthe real truth, as every snipe-shooter knows full well; and, whenentering on the sport, each one should be willing to repeat withinhimself, Audax omnia perpeti. Notwithstanding the numerous illsattendant on this recreation, it has many ardent admirers, who, inspite of wind and weather, cold and rain, mud and mire, are at eachsucceeding spring and autumn found ready at their posts, alleagerness to commence the fray; and, at the close of every season,each one has a long list of adventures to relate, not, perhaps, Of moving accidents by flood and field,Of hairbreadth scapes i the imminent deadly breach, but of many mishaps and hardships encountered during thecampaign on the filthy marshes, the most of which, though griev-ous at the time, in reality added zest to the diversion, and will everremain imprinted on the memory of the true sportsman as agreeablesouvenirs by which to recall the scenes of much past enjoyment.

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Wilsons snipe. 203 different plans for shooting snipes. Next for the snipe you must prepare:He darts like lightning through the air,With devious wing; a moment wait,Youll see the rover travel straight. There are many ways in vogue for overcoming the exaggerateddifficulties attending the shooting of snipes; in fact, every sports-man has some particular rule of his own to guide him, and recom-mends it in the strongest terms to every tyro panting to reach thatdesirable goal, a good snipe shot. However, laying all meansand modes aside, every one is well satisfied if he reaches home atthe close of a long days tramp with a few couples of these warybirds. AYhen, however, snipes are very abundant on our marshesand the Aveather favorable for shooting, it is no unusual thing foran experienced shot to retire from the field with fifteen or eventwenty couples of them. All the various systems for bagging snipes may be reduced tothe two following plans:—snap-shooting and deliberate shoot-ing; both

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Image from page 179 of “In pine-tree jungles : a handbook for sportsmen and campers in the great Maine woods” (1902)
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Identifier: inpinetreejungle00bang
Title: In pine-tree jungles : a handbook for sportsmen and campers in the great Maine woods
Year: 1902 (1900s)
Authors: Bangor and Aroostook Railroad Company Clifford, Fred H
Subjects: Outdoor life — Maine Maine — Description and travel
Publisher: Bangor : Bangor & Aroostook Railroad Company
Contributing Library: New York Public Library
Digitizing Sponsor: MSN

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Me7ition B. & A. Guide in Writing Advertisers. i68 CONSTRUCTION SUPPLIES. •iff •*»<^ •ift* •i4^ •»»<• •i^l^ -Vi** •5j<* •*»<• •»»»*»«»*• ii** *>*»»« •>Ji* **»*• ii* •S»«* The Pennsylvania Steel Company, il Manufacturers of Steel Rails, Blooms, Billets and Forgings, Frogs,Switches and Crossings. 5%

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J^i IX^^^ ^&•Sis Viaduct on Moosehead Lake Division, B. & A. R. R., buUt by thePenneylvania Steel Company. Steel Buildings, Bridges and Viaducts, andSpecial Steels for All Purposes. Main Office:GIRARD BUILDING, PHILADELPHIA, PA. Boston Office, Hason Building. Hills at New York Office, Empire Building. Steeltoa, Pa., and Baltimore Office, Contiiiental Trust Building. Sparrows Point, rid. v»<. Jk»«. J*»?. vMi!. Jk»«. J**.^?*. J*^!?. vM!. Jk«. OiJ«. v*?. ^^>!f ^y^ J*!*!. J*^*!. J^i?. .J^^V ^«i vM^^^ ^j^ Mention B. &» .(4. Guide in Writing Advertisers. COAL. 169 f , ^ , , , , , , , , , , , – – – – ^fi^ • r^e ^. & A. Burn New River Steam Coal Exclusively. • Chesapeake & Ohio Coal Agency Co. I ^== I I C. H» Sprague & Son, New England Agents I ===== —= I • I Room 55 Mason Building, No. 70 Kilby Street, | BOSTON, MASS. C. H. SPKAGTJE. ,* -r„i»„T,„^» w,,-^ ( 213 ? epft Telephone, Main P. W. SPRAG

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