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Image from page 399 of “Rambles in the path of the steam-horse. An off-hand olla podrida, embracing a general historical and descriptive view of the scenery, agricultural and mineral resources, and prominent features of the travelled route from Baltimore

A few nice philadelphia travel company images I found:

Image from page 399 of “Rambles in the path of the steam-horse. An off-hand olla podrida, embracing a general historical and descriptive view of the scenery, agricultural and mineral resources, and prominent features of the travelled route from Baltimore
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Identifier: ramblesinpathofs00bowe
Title: Rambles in the path of the steam-horse. An off-hand olla podrida, embracing a general historical and descriptive view of the scenery, agricultural and mineral resources, and prominent features of the travelled route from Baltimore to Harper’s Ferry, Cumberland, Wheeling, Cincinnati, and Louisville
Year: 1855 (1850s)
Authors: Bowen, Eli, b. 1824
Subjects: Baltimore and Ohio Railroad Company
Publisher: Philadelphia, W. Bromwell and W. W. Smith Baltimore, S. B. Hickcox, agent
Contributing Library: West Virginia University Libraries
Digitizing Sponsor: Lyrasis Members and Sloan Foundation

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r thebuilding and repair of steamboats, is now being erected on the oppositeside of the Scioto. The town contains numerous iron and other manufac-tories; and is in the vicinity of large beds of iron and coal. The present 882 KAMBLES IN THE PATH OF THE STEAM HOESE. Maysville. population is about five thousand. The Scioto river is about two hundredmiles to its source, but is not navigable with steam farther than Chilli-cothe, forty miles from Portsmouth, and thus far only with small boats.Chillicothe was laid out into a town in 1796, and subsequently becamethe capital of the State. Columbus, however, is now the seat of govern-ment. It is situated in the heart of the richest agricultural region of theState, and does an extensive trade in flour, pork-packing, &c. Presentpopulation nearly seven thousand. Columbus, the capital of the State, issituated fifty miles further up the Scioto, being ninety miles distant fromPortsmouth. It has a population of over seventeen thousand, and is con-

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Maysville. nected by railway and canal, with every section of the United States.Besides the immediate capital buildings, it contains a State LunaticHospital, an Asylum for the Blind, one for the Deaf and Dumb, and theOhio Penitentiary. Forty years ago the ground upon which this beautfulcity now stands, was a perfect wilderness, whose solitudes had not yetbeen broken by the march of civilisation. Maysville, the county seat of Massu, is one of the oldest and hand-somest cities in Kentucky. The situation, like that of Portsmouth, iselevated, commanding and picturesque ;—a range of bold and verdanthighlands, rising immediately behind it, and rendering its appearancefrom the boats passing up and down the river, extremely attractive.Thus confined to a narrow belt, between the river and the surroundinghills, the town is closely and compactly built, and gives every indicationof prosperity and industry. It is the entrepot of goods and produce im- RAMBLES m THE PATH OF THE STEAM HOESE. 883 Ci

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Image from page 15 of “The 1910 trip of the H.M.M.B.A. to California and the Pacific coast” (1911)
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Identifier: 1910tripofhmmbat00jame
Title: The 1910 trip of the H.M.M.B.A. to California and the Pacific coast
Year: 1911 (1910s)
Authors: James, George Wharton, 1858-1923
Subjects: Hotel Men’s Mutual Benefit Association Hotels
Publisher: San Francisco, Press of Bolte & Braden company
Contributing Library: The Library of Congress
Digitizing Sponsor: Sloan Foundation

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. Each road traversedassigned a passenger agent to accompany the party until he was succeededby the official representative of the next railway, the roads over which theXew York M. M. M. 1!. A. special traveled to Los .Angeles and San l-ran-ciseo being as follows: Xew York to ^^a<llin<ton. Central R. R. of Xew 10 THE 1010 TRIP ()F THE H. M. M. W. A. Jersey, Philadelphia «Sc Reading, and Baltimore & Ohio. Washington toXew Orleans, Southern R. R., X. & W. R. R.. A. G. S. R. R.. and O. & C.Route. Xew Orleans to San Francisco to Denver, Southern Pacific R. R.Chicago to Xew York, Lake Shore and Xew York Central. In the Crescent City Arriving at the Terminal Station in Xew Orleans, the party was metbv a committee of local hotelmcn and others, headed hv Mr. Theodore

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Tlie Original Six nt the New Yorl^ Delegation, who visited Californiawith the H. M. .M. B. A. in 18 6. Reading from left to right: Charles F.I^arzalere, Mrs. Wood, John Burke, E. M. Tiernev, Mrs. Tiernev, Mr.Wood. Grunewald. of the fine hostelry of that name, and including Russell Blakely.St. Charles Hotel, Mrs. Blakely and Miss Blakely; Justin Denechaud,Denechaud Hotel; Mr. and Mrs. L. A. Denechaud and Miss Juanita Dene-chaud ; Senator Voegtle, Cosmopolitan Hotel; Zilrs. oegtle; A. V. Mon-teleone and J. D. Kennedy, Monteleone Hotel; Councilman and Mrs.OConnor, Mrs. R. Miller, Charles A. Hartwell, Hart D. Xewman, GeorgeU. Dunbar, A. A. Aschaffenberg, A. J. Gelpi, T. Tranchina, CouncilmanJohn Frawley, Councilman Thomas Cunningham and Mr. Mayer. TO CALIFORNIA AND THE PACIFIC COAST 11 At the Filtration Plant Those who joined the ]iarty at the filtration plant were City AttorneyI. I). Moore and Miss Moore, and Superintendent Earl, of the Water andSewerai^e Board. Mr. Earl personally cond

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Image from page 196 of “Summer excursion routes and rates. Delaware, Lackawanna and western railroad company. 1893 ..” (1893)
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Identifier: summerexcursionr00delaw
Title: Summer excursion routes and rates. Delaware, Lackawanna and western railroad company. 1893 ..
Year: 1893 (1890s)
Authors: Delaware, Lackawanna and western railroad company. [from old catalog] Johnson, William Henry, [from old catalog] comp
Subjects:
Publisher: [New York, Printed by Livingston Middleditch co.
Contributing Library: The Library of Congress
Digitizing Sponsor: Sloan Foundation

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Consider you travel by the luxurious steamers of the CLYDE LINE, The only line of Steamships between New York and Jacksonville, Fla., without change. Affording a delightful sail among the Sea Islands along the Southern Coast, calling at Charleston, S. C. Sailing from Tier 29, East River, New York, MONDA YS, WEDNESDA YS and FRIDA YS at 3 P. M. Tables are supplied with the best the Northern and Southern Markets afford. THE CLYDE SHIPS are of modern construction, and provided with every appliancefor safety, comfort and speed. M. H. Clyde, A. T. M. Theo. G. Eger, T. M. A. J. Cole, Passr Agent. W. P. CLYDE & CO., GeneraJ Agents, 5 Bowling Green, New York. 12 S. Delaware Ave., Philadelphia, Pa. /vANS!QN HeaSE, WASHINGTON STREET, : MORRISTOWN, N. J.

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Situated in central part of City. The only first-class hotel in Northern New Jersey. Newly furnished throughout all the modern improvements. L. D. GUERIN, Proprietor.

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Image from page 233 of “Rambles in the path of the steam-horse. An off-hand olla podrida, embracing a general historical and descriptive view of the scenery, agricultural and mineral resources, and prominent features of the travelled route from Baltimore

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Image from page 233 of “Rambles in the path of the steam-horse. An off-hand olla podrida, embracing a general historical and descriptive view of the scenery, agricultural and mineral resources, and prominent features of the travelled route from Baltimore
philadelphia travel company
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Identifier: ramblesinpathofs00bowe
Title: Rambles in the path of the steam-horse. An off-hand olla podrida, embracing a general historical and descriptive view of the scenery, agricultural and mineral resources, and prominent features of the travelled route from Baltimore to Harper’s Ferry, Cumberland, Wheeling, Cincinnati, and Louisville
Year: 1855 (1850s)
Authors: Bowen, Eli, b. 1824
Subjects: Baltimore and Ohio Railroad Company
Publisher: Philadelphia, W. Bromwell and W. W. Smith Baltimore, S. B. Hickcox, agent
Contributing Library: West Virginia University Libraries
Digitizing Sponsor: Lyrasis Members and Sloan Foundation

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n she tell you how she does things ;—but she does them,and you know by the old rule, which tells us that the proof of thepudding is in the eating thereof, that she does them well. From herJohnny cake up to her saddle of mountain venison, the same excellencepervades her every efibrt, and the cook, therefore, in the varied privilegesof her superiority, is allowed unchecked to scald the pointer dogs, rapthe youthful skulls of peering dar-kies, and even pin the dish-cloth toyoung masters coat, when he venturesinto the threshold of her province. Our old friend here is a specimen,and a good one, of the Virginia boot-black, now almost unknown in tlmore travelled portions of the StatThere he sits, as in the engravin^,,morning after morning, with a rowof shining boots,—green tops, fairtops, and rod tops—ranged before himlike soldiers upon dress parade; whilenear him a pile of the same useful articles of pedal wear, still dis-colored with yesterdaj^^s mud, await the exercise of his skill.

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Tl e I!oot-Uaok. RAMBLES IN THE PATH OF THE STEAM HORSE. 217Slaves and Slavery.—The Boot-black. Like all old negroes, who have belonged to decayed families, there is atouch of melancholy in his demeanor, and right solemnly does he dwellupon the past. But what we wish especially to mention—as marking,indeed, the whole class to which he belongs—is the wonderful facilitywith which he forms a true estimate of those with whom he may be broughtin contact. He is seldom in error, and you will try in vain to ring coun-terfeit coin upon him. The true old-fashioned gentleman—the passingaway of whoso race, none lament more than he—though thread-bare andbroken in fortune, is at once recognised by old Billy, and treated withthe most humble deference and respect; while your fresh upstart, stand-ing in his flashy dress, and swelling with the pride of new-gotten wealth,meets but cold civility at his hands, and always occasions some mutteredcontrast with the gentlemen of former days, not espe

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Acela Express #2004
philadelphia travel company
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Acela Express (often called simply Acela) is the name used by Amtrak for the high-speed tilting train service operating between Washington, D.C. and Boston via Baltimore, Philadelphia, and New York along the Northeast Corridor (NEC) in the Northeast United States. The tilting design allows the train to travel at higher speeds on the sharply curved NEC without disturbing passengers, by lowering lateral G-forces.

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Acela_Express

History Minute: The front-row historical life of Albert Witte

History Minute: The front-row historical life of Albert Witte
History Minute: Some people are fortunate enough to have lives that are a front-seat to history. Respected University of Arkansas law professor Albert Witte was one such man. Witte was born in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, in 1923. His parents moved …
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Pennsylvania Liquor Control Board Achieves Multiple Sales Records in December 2015
–The Pennsylvania Liquor Control Board (PLCB) set three new sales records as 2015 drew to a close, achieving the highest one-day sales, highest single-month sales, and highest sales through the first half of a fiscal year in Pennsylvania history. On Dec.
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AP-PA–Pennsylvania News Digest, PA
The promise came on the day nine young people — eight of them under 18 — were ordered to pay Clabbers $ 206,300, what is believed to be the largest amount of restitution in the county's juvenile court history, for vandalizing his two rental homes and …
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Image from page 171 of “The Pennsylvania railroad: its origin, construction, condition, and connections. Embracing historical, descriptive, and statistical notices of cities, towns, villages, stations, industries, and objects of interest on its various li

Some cool philadelphia travel guide images:

Image from page 171 of “The Pennsylvania railroad: its origin, construction, condition, and connections. Embracing historical, descriptive, and statistical notices of cities, towns, villages, stations, industries, and objects of interest on its various li
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Identifier: array1875sipe
Title: The Pennsylvania railroad: its origin, construction, condition, and connections. Embracing historical, descriptive, and statistical notices of cities, towns, villages, stations, industries, and objects of interest on its various lines in Pennsylvania and New Jersey
Year: 1875 (1870s)
Authors: Sipes, William B., d. 1905 Pennsylvania Railroad. Passenger Dept
Subjects: Pennsylvania Railroad
Publisher: Philadelphia [Pennsylvania Railroad Co.] Passenger Dept.
Contributing Library: Northeastern University, Snell Library
Digitizing Sponsor: Northeastern University, Snell Library

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rkness. Someof the large rooms visited were named TheSnake Chamber, The Altar Room, andThe Senate Chamber, because of pecu-liarities they presented; and a clear, run-ning stream of only a few inches in depthand a dozen feet wide was forded, the waterof which was found to be cold and palat-able, with a strong odor of cinnamon.These explorations were continued for fivehours, the party having traveled in thattime, according to the twine they had usedto guide them in the labyrinth, (and fromthe many windings and passage-ways it isnot considered safe to penetrate any consid-erable distance without the use of this meansof finding the outlet again,) nineteen hun-dred yards—something over a mile. Per-haps the most remarkable feature about thecave, says the writer, is the varied and di-versified aspect of the different chambers andpassage-ways, and the fact that the exploreris not confined to any particular route, butafter entering for a distance of one hundred 154 THE PENNSYLVANIA RAILROAD.

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OLD FURNACE ON THE CONEMAUGH. yards is permitted to strike off at almostany point of the compass. You will findthe routes invariably different in the natureof the openings, and that all the passagescommunicate with each other. There is astory told of a young girl becoming lost init many years ago. She had been stolenfrom her home by a strolling band of gypsies,who had encamped in the neighborhood ofthe cave, and had visited it several times incompany with them. She effected her escapefrom the gypsies by taking refuge in the cave.Penetrating to a great distance, and beingunable to return, she perished of starvation.Her bones were found years afterwards. Millwood, three hundred and six miles. Derry, three hundred and eight miles.—Coal is mined near this station, and cokeburned for shipment. Agricultural productsare abundant and varied. The village con-tains four hotels. Population about 300. St. Clair, three hundred and ten miles.—A station for the accommodation of anagricultural po

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Image from page 88 of “The guide-board to health, peace, and competence ; or, the road to happy old age” (1872)
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Identifier: guideboardtoheal00hallrich
Title: The guide-board to health, peace, and competence ; or, the road to happy old age
Year: 1872 (1870s)
Authors: Hall, William Whitty, 1810-1876
Subjects: Medicine, Popular
Publisher: Springfield, Mass., D.E. Fisk and company Philadelphia, H. N. McKinney & Co
Contributing Library: University of California Libraries
Digitizing Sponsor: MSN

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to the next candy shop. These are little things, it istrue, but the mass of human enjoyment or sorrow, is made upof these self-same little things. A writer well says :— The little things of life have for more eflect upon charac-ter, reputation, friendship, and fortune, than the heartlessand superficial are apt to imagine. They are few, indeed,however rough by nature, who are not touched and softenedby kindness and courtesy. A civil word, a friendly remark,a generous compliment, an affable bow of recognition, allhave an influence; while surliness, incivility, harshness, andill-temptr, naturally enough, produce an efifect exactly to thereverse. The American people, as a whole, are, perhaps, notremarkable for courtesy. They are so actively engaged inthe bustle of life, in onward movements of commerce andtrade, that they have little leisure to cultivate and practicethose polished refinements, which are the results of edr.cation,cf travel, and of enlarged intercourse with society. Never-

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RAOE AND RUIN. 71 theless, we are uot a discourteous people, aud in the greatcities, the proprieties of manner, and the civilities of form,are attended to with a commendable degree of exactness. Still we are bound to confess that we are deficient in manyof the little courtesies of life — courtesies that are admirablycalculated to sweeten the intercourse of society, the inter-course of friendly feeling, and the general communion thattakes place, from day to day, between neighbors and com-panions. The excuse with many is, that they have not timeto practise the civilities to which we refer — that they are toomuch engaged in more important matters. Thus a friendlyvisit will uot be repaid, a polite note will be left unanswered,a neighborly call will be disregarded, a pleasant smile will bemet with a cold look of indifference, and a cordial grasp ofthe hand will be responded to with reluctance, if not surprise.All this may seem nothing, and yet the effect upon tbf mind,and the heart, is

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Image from page 72 of “Reminiscences of old Gloucester, or, Incidents in the history of the counties of Gloucester, Atlantic and Camden, New Jersey” (1845)
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Identifier: reminiscencesofo00mick
Title: Reminiscences of old Gloucester, or, Incidents in the history of the counties of Gloucester, Atlantic and Camden, New Jersey
Year: 1845 (1840s)
Authors: Mickle, Isaac
Subjects:
Publisher: Philadelphia : Townsend Ward
Contributing Library: University of Pittsburgh Library System
Digitizing Sponsor: Lyrasis Members and Sloan Foundation

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eynardcarried the pack in full cry to Salem,It was a point of honor not to give up,until the bush was taken; after whichthere ensued a banquet at Huggs,■whereat he who was first in at the deathwas for the time being the lion. TheGloucester farmers, who suffered muchin those days from the great number offoxes with which the county still abound-ed, were always glad to hear the sound • See Memoirs of Gloucester Fox HuntnigClub, by a Member. Philad. 1830, p. 15. t This gentleman, a Gloucester county farmer,won the plaudits of the whole Club by .plunginginto the Delaware after a fox which had brokenthrough th« ie«. Memoirs, Alc. p. SI. TIIK tOWNSHIP ON GLOUCKSTER. 63 of the horns and hounds. From the tenthof October to the tenth of April, the Clubhad the entire freedom of their fieldsand woods, and often on catching themusic of the approaching pack, the sturdyhusbandman bridled his best horse, andjoined the merry dashing train, drinkingas deep as any the excitement of theroyal sport.

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JONAS CATTELL. [From the Memoirs of the Gloucester Fox Hunt-ing Club.] There were many distinguished menconnected with the Gloucester Club;but none is more deserving immortalitythan Jonas Cattell! For twenty yearsthis worthy fellow was grand guide andwhipper-in to the Hunters, always athis post, says the memorialist, whe-ther at setting out with the company,leading off, at fault, or at the death.While all the rest rode, he travelled onfoot with his gun and tomakawk, andwas always on hand for any emergency,before half the riders came in sight.His physical strength and activity werealmost incredible. When about fiftyyears of age he ran a foot race fromMount HollJ to Woodbury with an In-dian runner of great celebrity, and cameoff victor. About the same time he wona wager by going on foot from Wood-bury to Cape Island in one day, deliver-ing a letter, and returning in the SBme manner, with an answer, on the dayfollowing. He accomplished this extra-ordinary feat with ease, and was willingt

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Retirement Community Hosts Historical Storyteller


Suffolk, VA (PRWEB) March 19, 2015

Robert (Bob) Torgler will bring tales of Benjamin Franklin to life at a presentation at Lake Prince Woods retirement community on Tuesday, March 31 at 2:00 p.m. The program is free and open to the public.

Torgler, who calls himself a student of history, has been a docent at the Smithsonian National Museum of American History and the National Archives, both in Washington, D.C. Rather than assuming the persona of historical characters, he uses storytelling to bring them to life.

Benjamin Franklin will be the subject of the presentation. In addition he does similar programs about Winston Churchill, Teddy Roosevelt, and four of the Founding Fathers: George Washington, John Adams, Alexander Hamilton, and Thomas Jefferson.

During a 30 year career with IBM he held a number of positions, among which was International Director of Public Sector Marketing for Europe, the Mid-East and Africa. In this role he spoke to business and government audiences in all the major capitals of Europe.

In retirement he became an American History lecturer on cruise ships, developing some 19 presentations.

“Everyone loves to hear a captivating story,” noted Resident Services Director Denise Brown, “and when it’s told about people we classify as American heroes it’s even more engaging.”

Lake Prince Woods is a residential retirement community offering an array of lifestyle choices. Located in Suffolk, Virginia, the community is nestled among 172 lovely wooded acres bordering Lake Prince. As a continuing care retirement community, Lake Prince Woods offers residential living, assisted living, memory care and skilled nursing care. To learn more, visit the website: http://www.lakeprincewoods.org.







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Historical Home in Society Hill, South Carolina

Historical Home in Society Hill, South Carolina

The Enoch Hanford House, locally known as Cedar Lawn is presently on the National Register of Historic Places. It is believed to have been built between 1800…
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530 Spruce Street in Philadelphia's Society Hill

Philadelphia’s Society Hill neighborhood is brimming with historical homes that line blocks of 18th and 19th century streetscapes. Here’s a look at one home …
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New Release Reveals Stories, Historical Treasure Trove of English Writers Homes; Book by Carol Chernega


Apollo, PA (PRWEB) October 19, 2011

Any literary fan knows that setting plays an important role in storytelling. This new book takes readers on a fascinating journey to 16 homes of English writers, recounting each authors biography, how they used their home or countryside in their stories, and what visitors will find at the home and directions to get there; all are open to the public. Descriptions of village life in Pride and Prejudice and the windswept moors of Wuthering Heights come to life in vivid detail. Both armchair adventurers and avid travelers will delight in the authors adventures and insights on literary England, a country shes visited more than 20 times since 1997.

A Dream House lovingly describes the homes and their connections to the literary world from the point of view of a frequent visitor and gardening professional. Included are homes of Jane Austen, William Wordsworth, Beatrix Potter, James Herriot, the Brontes, D.H. Lawrence, Charles Dickens, John Keats, Rudyard Kipling, Henry James and E.F. Benson, Virginia Woolf, Agatha Christie and Thomas Hardy. Among the sights are Austens writing table, Wordsworths sitting room, Potters Hill Top Farm and Herriots home and veterinary surgery. The author seamlessly blends biographical background, detailed description and travel tips in this tribute to some of Englands literary giants.

Author Carol Chernega is well-versed in literary England, having worked in Jane Austens garden in Chawton after earning the first spot in the International Visitor Program for the Jane Austen Society of North America. She also worked for the Jane Austen Society of the United Kingdom and the Chawton House Library. Chernega, who owns a garden maintenance business near Pittsburgh, specializes in English gardens and pruning. Shes also the English garden editor of BellaOnline, writing a column on creating an English garden, and has written a booklet on the topic. Learn more at http://www.onegardenatatime.biz.

For more information, visit http://www.adreamhousebook.com

A DREAM HOUSE: EXPLORING THE LITERARY HOMES OF ENGLAND

Carol Chernega

Dog Ear Publishing

ISBN: 978-145750-246-0

I need a good teen historical fiction book idea. It MUST be American history–but PLEASE, any ideas?

Question by peewee: I need a good teen historical fiction book idea. It MUST be American history–but PLEASE, any ideas?
I’ve thought about the Great Influenza but I’m not so sure I like that time period, and also the San Fransico earthquake, but I’m thinking something before the 1900s…not really feeling the Civil War either.

Best answer:

Answer by ♥ Lexi ♥
The Revulutionary war? Your charector could come across a time machine and travel to a lot of different times. Is that a good idea, or lame? I hope it’s not lame because I want to help. 🙂

Know better? Leave your own answer in the comments!