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Cool Liberty Bell images

Some cool liberty bell images:

You would think there is only one restaurant in NYC with a name like this one
liberty bell
Image by Ed Yourdon
This photo was taken on 9th Ave, between 22nd and 23rd Street.

In fact, you probably wouldn’t even think it was a restaurant. A shop? Yeah, maybe — after all, all of us shop for meatballs every once in a while, right?

But a restaurant? Well, okay, NYC is probably big enough to support one such restaurant … and I thought I was photographing something pretty unique when I took this picture. But then, exactly a month after I took this photo, I happened to be trudging along one of the avenues on the Upper East Side, still looking for photos that truly say "this is New York" … and, to my amazement, I saw another Meatball Shop!

Egad! How could this be? Google to the rescue! As soon as I got home, I googled the phrase (yeah, I know that I have a very small life — but admit it: you would have done the same thing!).

And I found that there is not just one, and not just two, Meatball Shops in NYC. There are five such establishments: one in the West Village, one in Chelsea, one in the Upper East Side, one in the Lower East Side, and one in Williamsburgh, Brooklyn. (Sorry, Queens, Bronx, and Staten Island: you aren’t worthy of such an honor).

But where, I hear you asking, where exactly are they located? I thought you would never ask … but here is the URL that will provide the details:

themeatballshop.com/locations/

A couple of additional details for you to ponder: note that patrons of this fine establishment are apparently known as "ballers." And note that the shop was given an "A" rating by the NYC restaurant inspectors; so you can be reasonably confident that they serve nothing but the very best meatballs.

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This set of photos is based on a very simple concept: walk every block of Manhattan with a camera, and see what happens. To avoid missing anything, walk both sides of the street.

That’s all there is to it …

Of course, if you wanted to be more ambitious, you could also walk the streets of Brooklyn, Queens, Staten Island, and the Bronx. But that’s more than I’m willing to commit to at this point, and I’ll leave the remaining boroughs of New York City to other, more adventurous photographers.

Oh, actually, there’s one more small detail: leave the photos alone for a month — unedited, untouched, and unviewed. By the time I actually focus on the first of these "every-block" photos, I will have taken more than 8,000 images on the nearby streets of the Upper West Side — plus another several thousand in Rome, Coney Island, and the various spots in NYC where I traditionally take photos. So I don’t expect to be emotionally attached to any of the "every-block" photos, and hope that I’ll be able to make an objective selection of the ones worth looking at.

As for the criteria that I’ve used to select the small subset of every-block photos that get uploaded to Flickr: there are three. First, I’ll upload any photo that I think is "great," and where I hope the reaction of my Flickr-friends will be, "I have no idea when or where that photo was taken, but it’s really a terrific picture!"

A second criterion has to do with place, and the third involves time. I’m hoping that I’ll take some photos that clearly say, "This is New York!" to anyone who looks at it. Obviously, certain landscape icons like the Empire State Building or the Statue of Liberty would satisfy that criterion; but I’m hoping that I’ll find other, more unexpected examples. I hope that I’ll be able to take some shots that will make a "local" viewer say, "Well, even if that’s not recognizable to someone from another part of the country, or another part of the world, I know that that’s New York!" And there might be some photos where a "non-local" viewer might say, "I had no idea that there was anyplace in New York City that was so interesting/beautiful/ugly/spectacular."

As for the sense of time: I remember wandering around my neighborhood in 2005, photographing various shops, stores, restaurants, and business establishments — and then casually looking at the photos about five years later, and being stunned by how much had changed. Little by little, store by store, day by day, things change … and when you’ve been around as long as I have, it’s even more amazing to go back and look at the photos you took thirty or forty years ago, and ask yourself, "Was it really like that back then? Seriously, did people really wear bell-bottom jeans?"

So, with the expectation that I’ll be looking at these every-block photos five or ten years from now (and maybe you will be, too), I’m going to be doing my best to capture scenes that convey the sense that they were taken in the year 2013 … or at least sometime in the decade of the 2010’s (I have no idea what we’re calling this decade yet). Or maybe they’ll just say to us, "This is what it was like a dozen years after 9-11".

Movie posters are a trivial example of such a time-specific image; I’ve already taken a bunch, and I don’t know if I’ll ultimately decide that they’re worth uploading. Women’s fashion/styles are another obvious example of a time-specific phenomenon; and even though I’m definitely not a fashion expert, I suspected that I’ll be able to look at some images ten years from now and mutter to myself, "Did we really wear shirts like that? Did women really wear those weird skirts that are short in the front, and long in the back? Did everyone in New York have a tattoo?"

Another example: I’m fascinated by the interactions that people have with their cellphones out on the street. It seems that everyone has one, which certainly wasn’t true a decade ago; and it seems that everyone walks down the street with their eyes and their entire conscious attention riveted on this little box-like gadget, utterly oblivious about anything else that might be going on (among other things, that makes it very easy for me to photograph them without their even noticing, particularly if they’ve also got earphones so they can listen to music or carry on a phone conversation). But I can’t help wondering whether this kind of social behavior will seem bizarre a decade from now … especially if our cellphones have become so miniaturized that they’re incorporated into the glasses we wear, or implanted directly into our eyeballs.

Oh, one last thing: I’ve created a customized Google Map to show the precise details of each day’s photo-walk. I’ll be updating it each day, and the most recent part of my every-block journey will be marked in red, to differentiate it from all of the older segments of the journey, which will be shown in blue. You can see the map, and peek at it each day to see where I’ve been, by clicking on this link

URL link to Ed’s every-block progress through Manhattan

If you have any suggestions about places that I should definitely visit to get some good photos, or if you’d like me to photograph you in your little corner of New York City, please let me know. You can send me a Flickr-mail message, or you can email me directly at ed-at-yourdon-dot-com

Stay tuned as the photo-walk continues, block by block …

Nice Liberty Bell photos

Check out these liberty bell images:

Liberty Bell Replica
liberty bell
Image by jcbwalsh
I belive this replica to the Liberty Bell dates to 1950. That year the U.S. government had replicas made as part of a campaign to sell savings bonds. Each state was given one. New Hampshire’s stands before the State House, which you see here in an early morning fog.

Cool Liberty Bell images

Check out these liberty bell images:

20th Street, between 8th & 9th Ave
liberty bell
Image by Ed Yourdon
These are all "extras" that I took while I was out walking around on my "everyblock" project — not good enough to foist upon the Flickr community as a "public" photo … but pictures that probably deserve a slightly better fate than just being deleted…

***************

This set of photos is based on a very simple concept: walk every block of Manhattan with a camera, and see what happens. To avoid missing anything, walk both sides of the street.

That’s all there is to it …

Of course, if you wanted to be more ambitious, you could also walk the streets of Brooklyn, Queens, Staten Island, and the Bronx. But that’s more than I’m willing to commit to at this point, and I’ll leave the remaining boroughs of New York City to other, more adventurous photographers.

Oh, actually, there’s one more small detail: leave the photos alone for a month — unedited, untouched, and unviewed. By the time I actually focus on the first of these "every-block" photos, I will have taken more than 8,000 images on the nearby streets of the Upper West Side — plus another several thousand in Rome, Coney Island, and the various spots in NYC where I traditionally take photos. So I don’t expect to be emotionally attached to any of the "every-block" photos, and hope that I’ll be able to make an objective selection of the ones worth looking at.

As for the criteria that I’ve used to select the small subset of every-block photos that get uploaded to Flickr: there are three. First, I’ll upload any photo that I think is "great," and where I hope the reaction of my Flickr-friends will be, "I have no idea when or where that photo was taken, but it’s really a terrific picture!"

A second criterion has to do with place, and the third involves time. I’m hoping that I’ll take some photos that clearly say, "This is New York!" to anyone who looks at it. Obviously, certain landscape icons like the Empire State Building or the Statue of Liberty would satisfy that criterion; but I’m hoping that I’ll find other, more unexpected examples. I hope that I’ll be able to take some shots that will make a "local" viewer say, "Well, even if that’s not recognizable to someone from another part of the country, or another part of the world, I know that that’s New York!" And there might be some photos where a "non-local" viewer might say, "I had no idea that there was anyplace in New York City that was so interesting/beautiful/ugly/spectacular."

As for the sense of time: I remember wandering around my neighborhood in 2005, photographing various shops, stores, restaurants, and business establishments — and then casually looking at the photos about five years later, and being stunned by how much had changed. Little by little, store by store, day by day, things change … and when you’ve been around as long as I have, it’s even more amazing to go back and look at the photos you took thirty or forty years ago, and ask yourself, "Was it really like that back then? Seriously, did people really wear bell-bottom jeans?"

So, with the expectation that I’ll be looking at these every-block photos five or ten years from now (and maybe you will be, too), I’m going to be doing my best to capture scenes that convey the sense that they were taken in the year 2013 … or at least sometime in the decade of the 2010’s (I have no idea what we’re calling this decade yet). Or maybe they’ll just say to us, "This is what it was like a dozen years after 9-11".

Movie posters are a trivial example of such a time-specific image; I’ve already taken a bunch, and I don’t know if I’ll ultimately decide that they’re worth uploading. Women’s fashion/styles are another obvious example of a time-specific phenomenon; and even though I’m definitely not a fashion expert, I suspected that I’ll be able to look at some images ten years from now and mutter to myself, "Did we really wear shirts like that? Did women really wear those weird skirts that are short in the front, and long in the back? Did everyone in New York have a tattoo?"

Another example: I’m fascinated by the interactions that people have with their cellphones out on the street. It seems that everyone has one, which certainly wasn’t true a decade ago; and it seems that everyone walks down the street with their eyes and their entire conscious attention riveted on this little box-like gadget, utterly oblivious about anything else that might be going on (among other things, that makes it very easy for me to photograph them without their even noticing, particularly if they’ve also got earphones so they can listen to music or carry on a phone conversation). But I can’t help wondering whether this kind of social behavior will seem bizarre a decade from now … especially if our cellphones have become so miniaturized that they’re incorporated into the glasses we wear, or implanted directly into our eyeballs.

Oh, one last thing: I’ve created a customized Google Map to show the precise details of each day’s photo-walk. I’ll be updating it each day, and the most recent part of my every-block journey will be marked in red, to differentiate it from all of the older segments of the journey, which will be shown in blue. You can see the map, and peek at it each day to see where I’ve been, by clicking on this link

URL link to Ed’s every-block progress through Manhattan

If you have any suggestions about places that I should definitely visit to get some good photos, or if you’d like me to photograph you in your little corner of New York City, please let me know. You can send me a Flickr-mail message, or you can email me directly at ed-at-yourdon-dot-com

Stay tuned as the photo-walk continues, block by block …

Liberty Bell History
liberty bell
Image by Emily Barney
I didn’t really know anything about the liberty bell, so learning that it was renamed such by the abolitionist movement was interesting

Build a Business to Cement Your Liberty

Among the most basic of human desires is that of Liberty. Having the freedom to do what we want, when we want, where we want, how we want and with who we want gives us almost unsurpassed happiness. Even in our world where humanity is experiencing the most freedom per capita in the history of our race there is still a long way to go individually and collectively to attaining that degree of freedom that allows us to focus solely on what is most important in our lives.

Of all the governmental systems that have been tried and tested none has so thoroughly out shined them all than has a democracy that preserves a capitalist economy. Within this system men and women are free to perform according to their abilities and they are rewarded well for that performance. The better we perform, the better the reward. Now after centuries and millennia of civilization finally it is completely within the individuals power to maximize their God given right to be completely and utterly free, or not.

In a society run by money it is money therefore that will allow us to break the last few bonds and venture across the world and universe free to explore, learn, cultivate loving healthy relationships and be happy. Business is a means of getting away from business. We seek money so we don’t have to worry about money. Once we have obtained enough of it we can stop and focus on LIFE.

Seek to build a business that serves, improves and lifts mankind. Seek to build a business that doesn’t need you for it to be profitable. Seek to build a business that people will appreciate, with their wallets. Once you have accomplished that you will no longer be bound by money and you will be free to do with your time what you will and enjoy the best things in life.

Thrive Learning Institute is dedicated to enabling the dreams and life pursuits of their clients through high quality training and personal coaching. Visit their blog at Thrive Learning Institute and be sure to check out the Twitter Profile of Thrive Learning Institute

Liberty at a Crossroads in America

liberty bell
by shinya

There is a new paradigm sweeping America. You know you are about to hear a part of its gospel each time someone qualifies a statement with the phrase, “In the post September 11th world…” You’ve all heard it a thousand times over the past five years.

“Freedom of speech is great, but in the post September 11th world…”

“I don’t want the government eavesdropping on my conversations, but in the post September 11th world…”

“I don’t agree with the war, but in the post September 11th world…”

Americans have been a fortunate and relatively free people for a long time. The first part of each of these statements, demonstrates the strength of our belief in the principle of freedom. We know–instinctively–that a powerful, all-knowing, unchecked government is a bad thing, but we have been sold a bill of goods that liberty and safety is a zero-sum game. “And, in the post September 11th world…”

We’ve heard the phrase so many times now that we have become almost oblivious to its implications. Inherent in its context is a fundamental belief that the Revolution of 1776 is an historical failure. That while freedom of speech, personal privacy, and a small unobtrusive government are high-sounding ideals, they simply are not practical in the “Post…well, you know”.

Libertarians and others committed to the principles espoused in the Declaration of Independence and the Bill of Rights bristle at this clearly statist paradigm. The unfortunate truth, though, is that it has slowly seeped into the thinking of most Americans. Gradually, we have been acclimatized to the September 11th reference and its auto-response–fear. Many Americans have accepted this zero sum liberty/safety premise as the basis for their assumptions about foreign policy. A generation of children is growing up believing this muted version of freedom is all they have the right to expect.
We’ve stood by as liberty after liberty, right after right, check and balance after check and balance has slowly been whittled away in the name of keeping us safe from the boogie man. Where is the accountability? Where is the evidence that the liberty/security trade off–wrong-headed as it is–has even yielded the supposed benefit of greater security?

What is the answer to people who view personal liberty as a situationally expendable commodity to be jettisoned at the first sign of threat? I believe the antidote is libertarianism. In the modern political landscape, only Libertarians are positioned to lead the resurgence of personal freedom in America. Too many elected Democrats and Republicans have thrown their lot in with the statists. Their answer to any problem–terrorism, natural disaster, you name it–is more government. Even when they are demonstrably incompetent and negligent, they unabashedly come to us with a straight face and ask us to give them more power and control. Is that even logical?

These statists have gained power–in the post September 11th world–by carefully using fear to manipulate the American people into poor judgments at home and abroad. They have practiced violence and coercion in a way, frankly, reminiscent of the very enemy they claim to be fighting. They have no respect for Constitution or the law. They have subverted Jefferson’s words in the Declaration of Independence by asserting that our rights come from the government and are only retained at their pleasure. They believe September 11th is their free pass to do whatever in the world they want.

Thankfully, our Founders’ wisdom and commitment bequeathed to us a ready means of peaceful revolution–the ballot box. The time for change is now. Vote Libertarian this year when you can. When Libertarian is not an option vote for the candidate who seems to believe most strongly in our founding principles and is willing to help us turn the statist trend around before liberty is forever stifled in America.

Ray Davis is a writer and thinker from the midwest. His writing advocates the principles of constitutional government in the United States, individual liberty, and personal responsibility. He currently serves as editor of The Free Kansan — the official newsletter of the Kansas Libertarian Party.

The Shame Of The USS Liberty Revisited

Fortunately, or unfortunately, some news stories have lives of their own. It’s as if they don’t want to die, which is sometimes a very good thing. Such a story is the disgraceful tale involving the USS Liberty, a disgrace which began more than forty one years ago and continues to this day.

Neither the disgrace nor the shame of the USS Liberty applies in any way to its crew or to its captain, William McGonagle, who subsequently received the Congressional Medal of Honor in recognition of his bravery and refusal to leave the Liberty’s bridge despite being wounded. The shame is on America, the shame is on our shameless politicians, and the shame is on Israel.

For those still unaware of what transpired on the afternoon of June 8th, 1967 in the waters off the Sinai Peninsula, a quick primer: The USS Liberty was a converted Victory ship, a 455 foot American naval vessel then being used for intelligence gathering during the 1967 Arab-Israeli war. It was attacked by Israeli air and naval forces, strafed and torpedoed, leaving 34 sailors dead and 174 injured and severely maimed.

A confessed news junky, I had never heard about the Liberty until a decade or so ago, testimony perhaps to the massive cover-up that followed the attack.

Back in January, 2008, I posted an article on my website, an interview with Rick Aimetti, a petty officer first class assigned to Damage Control aboard that U.S. Navy vessel. He was one of the survivors and still vividly recalled the events of that day.

The fortuitous circumstances and the content of that interview are detailed here: “Remembering the USS Liberty,” (January 10, 2008, genelalor.com/blog1/?p=19.)

A calm, reticent and composed man, Rick was nevertheless passionate in his recollections, especially about the friends he lost, but also in his certainty that it was a deliberate attack by a presumed ally on an unarmed American ship.

That assault continued for hours even though the Liberty was clearly marked and flying the stars and stripes. Subsequent waves of Israeli helicopter gunship pilots would later testify that no flag was visible, which was true. It had been obliterated.

Israeli helicopters first took out the ship’s antennae and shot down the flag mast before launching torpedoes in an attempt, first, to cripple the Liberty’s communications and, second, to sink the ship.

It struck me that with a new president taking office less than a month from today there was a possibility, however remote, that President Obama would do what eight presidents before him failed to do, namely, give official, government recognition of the Liberty heroes who died and were wounded that June day, and to acknowledge why they died and were wounded.

That Israel attacked and killed 34 and injured 174 Americans on the Liberty is indisputable. Israel ultimately admitted as much and paid reparations. What it never did was concede intent. Instead, Israel to this day alleges it was a “mistake,” a mistake which could only have been made by blind Israeli helicopter pilots and blind Israeli torpedo boat captains.

Petty Officer First Class Rick Aimetti was a witness and a survivor of the attacks on the USS Liberty but he can hardly be considered an objective observer. Running for cover, seeing your dead and bleeding fellow sailors, and trying to keep your ship from going down aren’t situations conducive to objectivity.

His status as an eye-witness has been supported by numerous other accounts, however. Our military and our politicians just love investigations, studies, and inquiries even if they rarely uncover the truth, that whole, nothing but the truth that scares the uniforms off our military leaders and which makes our politicians dive for cover when they can’t admit it.

Such is the truth of the USS Liberty. It has festered on some American consciences and in some American souls for over four decades now.

Five years ago, the National Security Agency, which was instrumental in the outfitting and in the mission of the Liberty, declassified, (under pressure), documents, recordings, and interviews relating to the assault on the USS Liberty: nsa.gov/liberty/

Although that wealth of material and information is fascinating, it nevertheless is transparently slanted as can be seen in the interviews of personnel who admit to being pro-Israel and in the greatly redacted translated transcripts of the Israeli pilots: nsa.gov/liberty/recordings.cfm

Far more objective is this analysis of the events of June 8th, 1967: lewrockwell.com/orig/margolis12.html . There Eric Margolis dares to spell out the truth and dares to explain and substantiate what really happened that day.

The unvarnished truth about the USS Liberty is ugly and shameful

Perhaps President Barack Hussein Obama will address that truth and redress the grievances of the crew members such as Rick Aimetti?

One can always hope for “change” from Obama, no?

(To follow: “Reactions,” “Consternation,” “Blame.”

http://genelalor.com/

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Lady Liberty Coins; A’ Must To Have’ Items For Collectors

liberty bell
by WSDOT

Collectors do not have the same focus as to the items they are collecting. While some hobbyists go to the distant places to look for their finds, others have to spend big amount on the certain item for the completion of their collection. There are two motives that drive the collectors; the eagerness to earn and the desire to feel the fulfillment brought by seeing the collection completed after years of devotion to such hobby. There are many things to collect depending upon the line of the collectors. But the items that catch the attention of the collectors recently are old coins. Some may wonder what stored in old coins that made it the subject of bizarre collectors. Old coins as it sound are coins basically valued because of rarity and beauty rarely one can see to any of the coins nowadays. Speaking of beauty; one of the coins that collectors are competing to get is the versions of lady liberty coins. What made this coin very interesting are its constantly changing designs.
One of the earliest designs of lady liberty coins can be seen in the dime circulated from 1837 to 1891. These coins were composed of 90% silver and 10% copper minted in Philadelphia. Designed by Christian Gobrecht the dime in its obverse side is the lady liberty of a draping gown seated on top of the rock. She held at her left hand what seems to be the pre eminent symbol of liberty; liberty cap. On the right hand is the shield with diagonal banner bearing the word Liberty. The lady liberty is encircled with thirteen stars which represent the thirteen states. Just below the image is the year the coin minted. On the reverse side is the wreath tied in the bow and the words around it United States of America at the top One dime at the bottom. There are many varieties of liberty coin but another one that has a unique provocative design and a must to have item for collectors are the quarter coins in 1917. The lady liberty was inscribed standing in a vague clarity of a woman emanating to be top naked thus causing speculations of desecration to the well loved symbol of liberty. Because of the public clamor that issuance of coins with such design, the new version was released the following year having identical design but the beasts are fully covered this time.

Chris Johnstone
10 Carter Dr
Guelph
Ontario Canada
http://www.goldandsilvercoinsinfo.com