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Image from page 399 of “Rambles in the path of the steam-horse. An off-hand olla podrida, embracing a general historical and descriptive view of the scenery, agricultural and mineral resources, and prominent features of the travelled route from Baltimore

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Image from page 399 of “Rambles in the path of the steam-horse. An off-hand olla podrida, embracing a general historical and descriptive view of the scenery, agricultural and mineral resources, and prominent features of the travelled route from Baltimore
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Identifier: ramblesinpathofs00bowe
Title: Rambles in the path of the steam-horse. An off-hand olla podrida, embracing a general historical and descriptive view of the scenery, agricultural and mineral resources, and prominent features of the travelled route from Baltimore to Harper’s Ferry, Cumberland, Wheeling, Cincinnati, and Louisville
Year: 1855 (1850s)
Authors: Bowen, Eli, b. 1824
Subjects: Baltimore and Ohio Railroad Company
Publisher: Philadelphia, W. Bromwell and W. W. Smith Baltimore, S. B. Hickcox, agent
Contributing Library: West Virginia University Libraries
Digitizing Sponsor: Lyrasis Members and Sloan Foundation

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r thebuilding and repair of steamboats, is now being erected on the oppositeside of the Scioto. The town contains numerous iron and other manufac-tories; and is in the vicinity of large beds of iron and coal. The present 882 KAMBLES IN THE PATH OF THE STEAM HOESE. Maysville. population is about five thousand. The Scioto river is about two hundredmiles to its source, but is not navigable with steam farther than Chilli-cothe, forty miles from Portsmouth, and thus far only with small boats.Chillicothe was laid out into a town in 1796, and subsequently becamethe capital of the State. Columbus, however, is now the seat of govern-ment. It is situated in the heart of the richest agricultural region of theState, and does an extensive trade in flour, pork-packing, &c. Presentpopulation nearly seven thousand. Columbus, the capital of the State, issituated fifty miles further up the Scioto, being ninety miles distant fromPortsmouth. It has a population of over seventeen thousand, and is con-

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Maysville. nected by railway and canal, with every section of the United States.Besides the immediate capital buildings, it contains a State LunaticHospital, an Asylum for the Blind, one for the Deaf and Dumb, and theOhio Penitentiary. Forty years ago the ground upon which this beautfulcity now stands, was a perfect wilderness, whose solitudes had not yetbeen broken by the march of civilisation. Maysville, the county seat of Massu, is one of the oldest and hand-somest cities in Kentucky. The situation, like that of Portsmouth, iselevated, commanding and picturesque ;—a range of bold and verdanthighlands, rising immediately behind it, and rendering its appearancefrom the boats passing up and down the river, extremely attractive.Thus confined to a narrow belt, between the river and the surroundinghills, the town is closely and compactly built, and gives every indicationof prosperity and industry. It is the entrepot of goods and produce im- RAMBLES m THE PATH OF THE STEAM HOESE. 883 Ci

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Image from page 15 of “The 1910 trip of the H.M.M.B.A. to California and the Pacific coast” (1911)
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Identifier: 1910tripofhmmbat00jame
Title: The 1910 trip of the H.M.M.B.A. to California and the Pacific coast
Year: 1911 (1910s)
Authors: James, George Wharton, 1858-1923
Subjects: Hotel Men’s Mutual Benefit Association Hotels
Publisher: San Francisco, Press of Bolte & Braden company
Contributing Library: The Library of Congress
Digitizing Sponsor: Sloan Foundation

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. Each road traversedassigned a passenger agent to accompany the party until he was succeededby the official representative of the next railway, the roads over which theXew York M. M. M. 1!. A. special traveled to Los .Angeles and San l-ran-ciseo being as follows: Xew York to ^^a<llin<ton. Central R. R. of Xew 10 THE 1010 TRIP ()F THE H. M. M. W. A. Jersey, Philadelphia «Sc Reading, and Baltimore & Ohio. Washington toXew Orleans, Southern R. R., X. & W. R. R.. A. G. S. R. R.. and O. & C.Route. Xew Orleans to San Francisco to Denver, Southern Pacific R. R.Chicago to Xew York, Lake Shore and Xew York Central. In the Crescent City Arriving at the Terminal Station in Xew Orleans, the party was metbv a committee of local hotelmcn and others, headed hv Mr. Theodore

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Tlie Original Six nt the New Yorl^ Delegation, who visited Californiawith the H. M. .M. B. A. in 18 6. Reading from left to right: Charles F.I^arzalere, Mrs. Wood, John Burke, E. M. Tiernev, Mrs. Tiernev, Mr.Wood. Grunewald. of the fine hostelry of that name, and including Russell Blakely.St. Charles Hotel, Mrs. Blakely and Miss Blakely; Justin Denechaud,Denechaud Hotel; Mr. and Mrs. L. A. Denechaud and Miss Juanita Dene-chaud ; Senator Voegtle, Cosmopolitan Hotel; Zilrs. oegtle; A. V. Mon-teleone and J. D. Kennedy, Monteleone Hotel; Councilman and Mrs.OConnor, Mrs. R. Miller, Charles A. Hartwell, Hart D. Xewman, GeorgeU. Dunbar, A. A. Aschaffenberg, A. J. Gelpi, T. Tranchina, CouncilmanJohn Frawley, Councilman Thomas Cunningham and Mr. Mayer. TO CALIFORNIA AND THE PACIFIC COAST 11 At the Filtration Plant Those who joined the ]iarty at the filtration plant were City AttorneyI. I). Moore and Miss Moore, and Superintendent Earl, of the Water andSewerai^e Board. Mr. Earl personally cond

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Image from page 196 of “Summer excursion routes and rates. Delaware, Lackawanna and western railroad company. 1893 ..” (1893)
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Identifier: summerexcursionr00delaw
Title: Summer excursion routes and rates. Delaware, Lackawanna and western railroad company. 1893 ..
Year: 1893 (1890s)
Authors: Delaware, Lackawanna and western railroad company. [from old catalog] Johnson, William Henry, [from old catalog] comp
Subjects:
Publisher: [New York, Printed by Livingston Middleditch co.
Contributing Library: The Library of Congress
Digitizing Sponsor: Sloan Foundation

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Consider you travel by the luxurious steamers of the CLYDE LINE, The only line of Steamships between New York and Jacksonville, Fla., without change. Affording a delightful sail among the Sea Islands along the Southern Coast, calling at Charleston, S. C. Sailing from Tier 29, East River, New York, MONDA YS, WEDNESDA YS and FRIDA YS at 3 P. M. Tables are supplied with the best the Northern and Southern Markets afford. THE CLYDE SHIPS are of modern construction, and provided with every appliancefor safety, comfort and speed. M. H. Clyde, A. T. M. Theo. G. Eger, T. M. A. J. Cole, Passr Agent. W. P. CLYDE & CO., GeneraJ Agents, 5 Bowling Green, New York. 12 S. Delaware Ave., Philadelphia, Pa. /vANS!QN HeaSE, WASHINGTON STREET, : MORRISTOWN, N. J.

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Situated in central part of City. The only first-class hotel in Northern New Jersey. Newly furnished throughout all the modern improvements. L. D. GUERIN, Proprietor.

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Image from page 233 of “Rambles in the path of the steam-horse. An off-hand olla podrida, embracing a general historical and descriptive view of the scenery, agricultural and mineral resources, and prominent features of the travelled route from Baltimore

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Image from page 233 of “Rambles in the path of the steam-horse. An off-hand olla podrida, embracing a general historical and descriptive view of the scenery, agricultural and mineral resources, and prominent features of the travelled route from Baltimore
philadelphia travel company
Image by Internet Archive Book Images
Identifier: ramblesinpathofs00bowe
Title: Rambles in the path of the steam-horse. An off-hand olla podrida, embracing a general historical and descriptive view of the scenery, agricultural and mineral resources, and prominent features of the travelled route from Baltimore to Harper’s Ferry, Cumberland, Wheeling, Cincinnati, and Louisville
Year: 1855 (1850s)
Authors: Bowen, Eli, b. 1824
Subjects: Baltimore and Ohio Railroad Company
Publisher: Philadelphia, W. Bromwell and W. W. Smith Baltimore, S. B. Hickcox, agent
Contributing Library: West Virginia University Libraries
Digitizing Sponsor: Lyrasis Members and Sloan Foundation

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About This Book: Catalog Entry
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n she tell you how she does things ;—but she does them,and you know by the old rule, which tells us that the proof of thepudding is in the eating thereof, that she does them well. From herJohnny cake up to her saddle of mountain venison, the same excellencepervades her every efibrt, and the cook, therefore, in the varied privilegesof her superiority, is allowed unchecked to scald the pointer dogs, rapthe youthful skulls of peering dar-kies, and even pin the dish-cloth toyoung masters coat, when he venturesinto the threshold of her province. Our old friend here is a specimen,and a good one, of the Virginia boot-black, now almost unknown in tlmore travelled portions of the StatThere he sits, as in the engravin^,,morning after morning, with a rowof shining boots,—green tops, fairtops, and rod tops—ranged before himlike soldiers upon dress parade; whilenear him a pile of the same useful articles of pedal wear, still dis-colored with yesterdaj^^s mud, await the exercise of his skill.

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Tl e I!oot-Uaok. RAMBLES IN THE PATH OF THE STEAM HORSE. 217Slaves and Slavery.—The Boot-black. Like all old negroes, who have belonged to decayed families, there is atouch of melancholy in his demeanor, and right solemnly does he dwellupon the past. But what we wish especially to mention—as marking,indeed, the whole class to which he belongs—is the wonderful facilitywith which he forms a true estimate of those with whom he may be broughtin contact. He is seldom in error, and you will try in vain to ring coun-terfeit coin upon him. The true old-fashioned gentleman—the passingaway of whoso race, none lament more than he—though thread-bare andbroken in fortune, is at once recognised by old Billy, and treated withthe most humble deference and respect; while your fresh upstart, stand-ing in his flashy dress, and swelling with the pride of new-gotten wealth,meets but cold civility at his hands, and always occasions some mutteredcontrast with the gentlemen of former days, not espe

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Acela Express #2004
philadelphia travel company
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Acela Express (often called simply Acela) is the name used by Amtrak for the high-speed tilting train service operating between Washington, D.C. and Boston via Baltimore, Philadelphia, and New York along the Northeast Corridor (NEC) in the Northeast United States. The tilting design allows the train to travel at higher speeds on the sharply curved NEC without disturbing passengers, by lowering lateral G-forces.

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Acela_Express