Image from page 9 of “Modern travel, a record of exploration, travel” (1921)

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Image from page 9 of “Modern travel, a record of exploration, travel” (1921)
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Identifier: moderntravelreco00davi
Title: Modern travel, a record of exploration, travel
Year: 1921 (1920s)
Authors: Davidson, Norman James. [from old catalog]
Subjects: Voyages and travels
Publisher: Philadelphia, J. B. Lippincott company London, Seeley, Service & co., ltd.
Contributing Library: The Library of Congress
Digitizing Sponsor: The Library of Congress

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Member of the Scottish Nat-ional Antarctic Expedition 1902-04 ;Medalist, R.S.G.S ; Cuthbert PeekGrant, R.G.S. Many Illustrations&> 3 Maps. Demy 8vo. 255. net. Second Edition. Unexplored New Guinea. A Record of the Travels, Adventurescsr Experiences of a Resident Magi-strate amongst the Head-HuntingSavages Ss Cannibals of the Unex-plored Interior of New Guinea. ByWilfred N. Beavek, with an In-troduction by A. C. HADDON, M.A.,Sc.D., F.R.S. With 24 Illustrations<y 4 Maps. Demy 8vo. 25s. net. Modern Whaling and Bear- Huutingf. A Record of Present-day Whalingwith Up-to-date Appliances in manyParts of the World, and of Bearand Seal Hunting in the ArcticRegions. By W. G. Burn Murdoch,F.R.S.G.S. With 110 Illustrations.Demy Bvo, 21s. net. Third. Edition. Prehistoric Man ^ His Story. A Sketch of the History of Mankindfrom the Earliest Times. By Prof.G.F.Scott Elliot, M. A. (Cantab),B.Sc.(Edin.), F.R.S.E., F.L.S.,F.R.G.S. With 62 Illustrations.IDS. 6d. net. SEELEY, SERVICE is CO. LTD.

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Captain Haywoods Arab Guide, Mahomed-Ben-Kaid Kaddour This man, to whose skill and endurance he was indebted for safely ciossing some eight hundredmiles of the Sahara wastes, was a typical, hardy desert wanderer. With a cupful of water and ahandful of dates as his daily ration he would bear the scorching heat and suffocating sandstormswithout showing any signs of fatigue. MODERN TRAVEL A RECORD OF EXPLORATION TRAVEL ADVENTURE & SPORT IN ALL PARTS OF THE V^ORLD DURING THE LAST FORTY YEARS DERIVED FROM PERSONAL ACCOUNTS BY THE TRAVELLERS BY NORMAN J. DAVIDSON, B.A. (Oxon.) Author of Romance of the Spanish Main,* Things Seen in Oxford, (£f c, &c. With 5J illustrations l^ lo maps PHILADELPHIAJ. B. LIPPINCOTT COMPANY LONDON : SEELEY, SERVICE & CO., Ltd.I92I k^^ CONTENTS CHAPTER I PAGE Hunting Mighty Game . . . . . . .17 CHAPTER II Hunting Mighty Game—continued . . . . .26 CHAPTER III Hunting Mighty Game—continued . . . . .31 CHAPTER IVThe Ice-bound Shores of Labrador …..moderntravelreco00davi

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Image from page 160 of “A trip to the Orient; the story of a Mediterranean cruise” (1907)
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Identifier: triptoorientstor00jacorich
Title: A trip to the Orient; the story of a Mediterranean cruise
Year: 1907 (1900s)
Authors: Jacob, Robert Urie
Subjects: Middle East — Description and travel
Publisher: Philadelphia, The J. C. Winston co
Contributing Library: University of California Libraries
Digitizing Sponsor: MSN

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th anger. It w^as not the regular hour for prayer in the mosque,but a number of worshipers were devoutly kneelingat different places in the interior, with faces turnedtoward a black stone in the south wall, which indi-cated the direction of the holy city of Mecca. Others,squatting on their bare heels, were reading or recitingin monotonous tones parts of the Koran. There areno benches or chairs in the building; Moslem worshipersdo not require seats while at their devotions. Thegreat dome, over one hundred feet in width, rises ingrandeur one hundred and eighty feet overhead, sup-ported by four huge columns each seventy feet in circum-ference. A circle of windows, forty-four in number,around the dome illumines the golden mosaics whichcover the ceiling. A mosaic picture in the domerepresenting the Almighty, has been obliterated by theTurks and covered with green linen cloth. A versefrom the Koran, in gilt Arabic characters almost thirtyfeet long, is painted on this cloth. The sentence, as

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THROUGH THE NARROW STREETS OF THE CITY.(149) I50 A TRIP TO THE ORIENT. translated, begins: God is the light of heaven andearth, and ends, God alone sheddeth His light onwhomsoever He pleaseth. If the Moslems believe in the Bible and in God as asupreme being, why did the}^ destroy the mosaic repre-sentation of God on the ceiling? inquired one of thevisitors. The Moslems do believe in the Bible and in oneSupreme God, was the reply, and it was this verybelief that led them to paint out the picture of Godand to destroy all the images and paintings of saints;for Gods command is: Thou shalt not make unto theeany graven image, or any likeness of anything that is inthe heaven above, or that is in the earth beneath,or that is in the water under the earth. Thou shalt notbow down thyself to them. The Moslems, continued the guide, regardMahomet as the Prophet of God, and the Koran aswritten by him under the inspiration of God; but theydo not worship Mahomet or any image or picture ofhim. We pause

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Image from page 385 of “View of the valley of the Mississippi, or, The emigrant’s and traveller’s guide to the West : containing a general description of that entire country : and also notices of the soil, productions, rivers, and other channels of interc
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Identifier: viewofvalleyofmi00bair
Title: View of the valley of the Mississippi, or, The emigrant’s and traveller’s guide to the West : containing a general description of that entire country : and also notices of the soil, productions, rivers, and other channels of intercourse and trade : and likewise of the cities and towns, progress of education, &c. of each state and territory
Year: 1834 (1830s)
Authors: Baird, Robert, 1798-1863
Subjects: Mississippi River Valley United States
Publisher: Philadelphia : H.S. Tanner
Contributing Library: New York Public Library
Digitizing Sponsor: MSN

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enerally con-stitutes every second line of the song. These chorussesare usually an unmeaning string of words, such as Ohio,Ohio, Oh-i-o ; or O hang, boys, hang ; or O stormy,stormy, &;c. When tired with the insipid gabble of thecard-table in the cabin, or disinclined to converse withany one, I have spent hours in listening to the boat songsof these men. In conclusion, I would remark that it is the testimonyof the captains with whom I have conversed, that thetemperance reform is making gradual progress on boardthe steam-boats of the West. On hoard the boat onwhich this chapter loas written^ no ardent spirits aredrunk by either officers or men. Still, much remains tobe done. But I must close this long, but still imperfect, accountof the steam-boats in the Valley of the Mississippi. 34i^ ige anditc. &c. n as I3llers,of theiteredf our )ne of! Val-of the ^7W vhich statevhichy and _,. nn of TILD-^N FOt pass. ——–^ Eng- to it!., asjver,ining)n on)r byhichBuf.nces 73 80 96 105 113

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HINTS TO EMIGRANTS, ETC. 341^ CHAPTER XXVIII. Hints to Emigrants on the modes of removing to the West.—Stage andSteam-boat Routes.—Expenses of removing, and of travelling, &c. &c. I PROPOSE to give, in this chapter, such information as Iam able, which may be useful to emigrants and travellers,respecting the various modes of going to the Valley of theMississippi, and the expenses which must be encounteredby those who travel, or remove, to that part of ourcountry. There are three general and grand routes, some one ofwhich must be pursued by every one who visits the Val-ley of the Mississippi, from the states which lie east of theAllegheny Mountains:— I. By the Lakes on the north.—This is the route whichemigrants and travellers from New England and the stateof New York will pursue. There are two points whichall of the first named class will aim at, viz.: Albany andBuffalo. The major part of the New York column ofemigration will have only the latter named place to pass. As

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