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Nice Philadelphia Travel Company photos

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Image from page 357 of “King’s handbook of Springfield, Massachusetts : a series of monographs, historical and descriptive” (1884)
philadelphia travel company
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Identifier: kingshandbookofs00king
Title: King’s handbook of Springfield, Massachusetts : a series of monographs, historical and descriptive
Year: 1884 (1880s)
Authors: King, Moses, 1853-1909 Clogston, William
Subjects: Springfield (Mass.) — Description and travel Springfield (Mass.) — Bibliography
Publisher: Springfield, Mass. : J.D. Gill, Publisher
Contributing Library: New York Public Library
Digitizing Sponsor: MSN

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NGS HANDBOOK OF SPRINGFIELD. made a specialty. Here the finest line of covered buttons in the countryare manufactured. The coverings of soutache, velvet, lasting, mohair, areimported, and pure dye sewing-silk braid is of American manufacture. Thethird floor of the main building is used for drilling and finishing thevegetable-ivory buttons. The second building, which is directly acrossthe street, and reached by a bridge from the main building, has the sameexcellent arrangement. The first floor is devoted to the dyeing of vege-table-ivory buttons; the second floor, to the ornamenting and chemicaldepartments ; the third, to carding, and to the packing of the buttons; andthe fourth, to the manufacture of boxes. The average amount of workturned out by the company is 3,000 gross a day. The W. G. Medlicott Company, manufacturers of full-fashioned knitgoods, have their mills on Morris Street. Since the business was estab-lished in this city, the company have prospered and grown so that to-day

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The W G. Medlicott Co.s Mills, on Morris Street. they stand among the leading industries of the valley. They are now theonly mills in Springfield where textile goods are manufactured; and, whilethere are many in the country that are larger, there are none better equippedor appointed. The machinery is all of the most approved patterns, and thegoods which these mills put upon the market are acknowledged of superiormake and finish. The products of the mills are mens, womens, and chil-drens underwear, all grades of Shetland Scotch wool, white merino, whiteScotch wool, scarlet wool; fancy colored merino goods also being made.The market is supplied through the companys selling-agents, — Brown,Wood, & Kingman, who have houses at New York, Boston, Philadelphia,and Chicago. The W. G. Medlicott Company was established in 1S81, by ~7$ W I .y<=; S Jr 21 -*-i i DJ ^ rs c ^f e/3

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Image from page 295 of “Illustrated catalogue and general description of improved machine tools for working metal” (1899)
philadelphia travel company
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Identifier: illustratedcatal00sell
Title: Illustrated catalogue and general description of improved machine tools for working metal
Year: 1899 (1890s)
Authors: Sellers, William, & co. [from old catalog]
Subjects: Machine-tools Machinery
Publisher: Philadephia, Levytype company
Contributing Library: The Library of Congress
Digitizing Sponsor: The Library of Congress

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15-TON ELECTRIC TRAVELLING CRANE.In Machine-Shop of Wm. Sellers & Co., Incorporated. 32 ft. span. Fixed drum, single motor type. Runs on track supportedwholly from roof. Head room available was very limited, and the bridge girdersare only 33 deep. 290 Wm. Sellers & Co., Incorporated, Philadelphia, Pa. Plate No. 239.

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15-TON POWER TRAVELLING CRANE. In the Erecting-Shop of the Geo. F. Blake Mfg. Co. 41 ft. span. Runway 330 ft. long. As shown it was driven b} a squareshaft carried in our patent bearings. After many years of successful service asingle electric motor was attached to the crane and the square shaft removed. Wm. Sellers & Co., Incorporated, Philadelphia, Pa. 2gi Plate No. 240.

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Cool Philadelphia Tourism images

Check out these philadelphia tourism images:

ji6592.JPG
philadelphia tourism
Image by Sangre-La.com
ji6592 new hope pa pennsylvania bucks county the parry mansion museum

Common Threads, mural by Meg Saligman, 1997
philadelphia tourism
Image by carlosoliveirareis
Restaurado em 2011 pela City of Philadelphia Mural Arts Program @ Philadelphia PA, EUA

IMG_0754

Pennsylvania – Valley Forge: Welcome Center at Valley Forge
philadelphia tourism
Image by wallyg
Valley Forge National Historical Park, encompassing 3,466-acres eighteen miles northwest of Philadelphia, preserves and reinterprets the site where the the main body of the Continental Army–between 10,000 and 12,000 troops–was encamped during from December 19, 1778 to June 19, 1778, the American Revolutionary War.

After the Battle of White Marsh (or Edge Hill), Washington chose Valley Forge as an encampment because it was between the Continental Congress in York, Supply Depots in Reading, and British forces in Philadelphia. Undernourished and poorly clothed through the harsh winter, Washington’s troops were ravaged by disease, suffering as many as two thousand losses, with thousands more listed as unfit for futy. Despite the conditions, the winter at Valley Forge proved invaluable for the young army, which underwent its first uniform training regimen, under the guidance of Prussian drill master, Baron Friedrich von Steuben.

Valley Forge, named for the iron forge built along Valley Creek in the 1740’s, was established as the first state park of Pennsylvania in 1893 by the Valley Forge Park Commission. In 1923, the VFPC was brought under the Department of Forests and Waters and later incorporated into the Pennsylvania Historical and Museum Commission in 1971. In 1976, Pennsylvania gave the park as a gift to the nation for the the Bicentennial. The National Park System established the area as Valley Forge National Historical Park on July 4, 1976.

The modern park features a newly renovated Welcome Center, which includes a museum exhibit with artifacts found during excavations of the park, an interactive Muster Roll of Continental Soldiers encamped at Valley Forge, Ranger-led Gallery Programs and Walks, A Storytelling Program, A Photo Gallery, A Tourism Bureau Information Desk and the Encampment Store.

Valley Forge National Historical Park National Register #66000657 (1966)

Nice Philadelphia Travel Company photos

Some cool philadelphia travel company images:

Image from page 80 of “Book of the Royal blue” (1897)
philadelphia travel company
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Identifier: bookofroyalblue19balt
Title: Book of the Royal blue
Year: 1897 (1890s)
Authors: Baltimore and Ohio railroad company. [from old catalog]
Subjects: Middle Atlantic States — Description and travel
Publisher: Baltimore
Contributing Library: The Library of Congress
Digitizing Sponsor: Sloan Foundation

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A TEN DAY stop-over at Philadelphia is granted on all one-way first class limited ticketsto New York or points east thereof, via Baltimore & Ohio R. R. Passengers desir-ing stop-over will notify conductor prior to arrival at Philadelphia, so that tickets may beproperly endorsed. Tickets must be deposited with ticket agent at B. & 0. station,Twenty-Fourth and Chestnut Streets, Philadelphia, immediately on arrival, who will issueexchange ticket good on all trains between Philadelphia and New York via Bound Brookline, and which will be honored for passage from any P. & R. R. R. depot in Philadelphiafrom which New York trains are run. 8topO vcr 0rivikgc at ^aehington

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NEW CONGRESSIONAL LIBRARY. WASHINGTON. D, C. A TEN DAY stop-over at Washington. D. C, is granted on all through tickets betweenthe East and West, via Baltimore & Ohio R, R. Stop-over will also be granted onthe return journey on round-trip tickets, within the final limit of such tickets, but notexceeding ten days. Passengers desiring stop-over will notify conductor prior to arrival atWashington, so that tickets may be properly endorsed. Tickets must be deposited withticket agent at B. &. O. station in Washington immediately on arrival, who will retain themuntil the journey is to be resumed, when they will be made good for continuous passageto destination by extension or exchange. This arrangement will doubtless be greatly appre-ciated by the traveling public, because it will permit the holders of through tickets to makea brief visit to the National Capital without additional outlay for railroad fare.

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Image from page 154 of “The book of Boston” (1916)
philadelphia travel company
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Identifier: bookofboston00shack
Title: The book of Boston
Year: 1916 (1910s)
Authors: Shackleton, Robert, 1860-1923
Subjects: Boston (Mass.) — Description and travel
Publisher: Philadelphia, The Penn publishing company
Contributing Library: The Library of Congress
Digitizing Sponsor: Sloan Foundation

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ade a little more than a century ago. The hall itself, above the public market, is neverrented, but is forever to be used freely by the peoplewhenever they wish to meet together to discuss pub-lic affairs; and this alone would make the buildingproudly notable. And many a great man, and manya man who was deeply in earnest even if not great,has spoken in this hall. And it is still used freelyfor the public meetings of to-day. The meeting hall, almost square, has a right-angledarrangement of seats, and, with its rows of Doriccolumns, is quite distinguished. And one notices thata winding stairway leads down from the very floorof the speakers platform and wonders if it is to facili-tate the entrance of popular speakers in case of agreat crowd, or, on the other hand, to facilitate thehasty exit of the unpopular! One notices, too, thatthe balcony has peculiar effectiveness of proportion,adding much to the effectiveness of the entire hall,and further notices, as an additional point on the 134

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Image from page 391 of “Book of the Royal blue” (1897)
philadelphia travel company
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Identifier: bookofroyalblue11balt
Title: Book of the Royal blue
Year: 1897 (1890s)
Authors: Baltimore and Ohio railroad company. [from old catalog]
Subjects: Middle Atlantic States — Description and travel
Publisher: Baltimore
Contributing Library: The Library of Congress
Digitizing Sponsor: Sloan Foundation

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e the greatestdetriment to the character of the train thatcould be conceived, as a traveler is generallysupersensitive on the subject of eating. To quote from the pamphlet: The Royal Limited trains of theRoyal Blue Line between Washington,Baltimore, Philadelphia and New York areelectrically equipped with fans and lightsthroughout, adding materially to the com-fort of passengers during the heated season. 20 ELECTRIC FANS, AN ADJUNCT TO COMFORTABLE TRAVEL. Each of the exquisite Pullman parlorcars is provided with high speed fans inthe parlors and drawing rooms, keeping theair fresh and cool on the hottest days. Theobservation and dining cars are particularlyinviting. Luxurious comfort of passengers is theessential feature of the Royal Limited, with no extra fare other than the regularPullman charge. Dinner is served table dhote.The announcement is simple but effect-ive, and the traveler who is earnestly de-sirous of providing comfort for himselfwould find it on the Royal Limitedtr.iins.

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Cool Philadelphia Travel Company images

A few nice philadelphia travel company images I found:

Image from page 58 of “Glimpses of medical Europe” (1908)
philadelphia travel company
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Identifier: glimpsesofmedica00thom
Title: Glimpses of medical Europe
Year: 1908 (1900s)
Authors: Thompson, Ralph L. (Ralph Leroy), 1872-
Subjects: Medicine Medicine Education, Medical Travel
Publisher: Philadelphia, London, J.B. Lippincott company
Contributing Library: Columbia University Libraries
Digitizing Sponsor: Open Knowledge Commons

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Botany and turn the laughon Professor Rosen. While Linnaeus was able to make hisdepartment in the University of Sweden themost famous in the world, and to keep foreignnations and learned societies busy in con-ferring medals and degrees upon him, he wasnever able to classify his own little homeherbarium. His wife was reported to be givento frivolity and dissipation, and, notwith-standing the fame of her husband, she wasfinally denied admission to the Court. Thefive children of these two incompatibles wentfor the most part the way of the mother,although one daughter made some importantexperiments in plant life, and a son, whonever did anything out of the ordinary, suc-ceeded Linnaeus at the University. 50 UPSALA Linnaeus was apparently a man who shouldnot have married, for he did not have thehappy faculty of mixing emotion with intel-lect, and it was undoubtedly his neglect ofhis wife that caused her to seek companion-ship in those whose knowledge was lesscryptogamous than her husbands.

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House of Linn^.us We found the medical department of theUniversity of great interest. There are abouta hundred and sixty students of medicine here,and their needs are amply provided for. It isinteresting to compare some points in the med-ical training here with those at home. Take,for instance, the course in pathology. Thestudent here has pathology rubbed into him 51 MEDICAL EUROPE for three years, and he can get more if hewishes. There is a large building devotedwholly to pathology. It contains lecture-rooms, museum, post-mortem room, and nu-merous rooms for individual research. Thereare two professorships in this subject. UlrikQuensel, wdio is chief of the department, is apleasant man to meet. He has a pleasingsmile and a nice little way of throwing backhis head when he laughs, which he does fre-quently. All the time he was showing usabout he held tenaciously to the butt of asmall cigar. There was perhaps two centi-metres of it in all. Occasionally he wouldmanage to get the end of i

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Image from page 346 of “The Street railway journal” (1884)
philadelphia travel company
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Identifier: streetrailwayjo281906newy
Title: The Street railway journal
Year: 1884 (1880s)
Authors:
Subjects: Street-railroads Electric railroads Transportation
Publisher: New York : McGraw Pub. Co.
Contributing Library: Smithsonian Libraries
Digitizing Sponsor: Smithsonian Libraries

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ONE OF THE .500-KW, D. C. TURBO-GENERATORS IN POWERSTATION NO. 2 the same. This indicates that the brakes do not release well,and also indicates a continuous friction which consumesenergy that should be more usefully applied to the operationof the equipment. SCHEDULES AND FARES At present a half-hour schedule is given on the WestChester line between West Chester and Sixty-Third Street. CONSTRUCTION CAR, PHILADELPHIA S.TRACTION COMPANY WEST CHESTER

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STANDARD INTERURBAN CAR WITH STEEL UNDERFRAME Ol-& WEST CHESTER TRACTION COMPANY A 15-minute schedule is given on the Ardmore line fromSixty-Third Street to Ardmore. A 15-minute schedule is givenon the Clifton line from Sixty-Third Street to Collindale. Theservice is given with single-car units. As soon as the elevatedtrains are placed in operation it is proposed to give thesesame schedules, but it is believed that at certain hours of theday, at least, it will be necessary to run two and three-car The fares are based on the zone system, and a separate 5-cent fare is collected from each passenger at each zone. For watching the efficiency of the schedules, the record,shown on the opposite page, is kept. On this is entered thenumber of passengers carried on each trip, in each fare zone,and as the seating capacity of the cars is known, it becomesa simple matter to determine if the cars are properly servingthe travel at each hour of the day.In this sheet the number of pas-sengers is en

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Image from page 144 of “Illustrated catalogue and general description of improved machine tools for working metal” (1899)
philadelphia travel company
Image by Internet Archive Book Images
Identifier: illustratedcatal00sell
Title: Illustrated catalogue and general description of improved machine tools for working metal
Year: 1899 (1890s)
Authors: Sellers, William, & co. [from old catalog]
Subjects: Machine-tools Machinery
Publisher: Philadephia, Levytype company
Contributing Library: The Library of Congress
Digitizing Sponsor: The Library of Congress

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and supported by an ex-tended bearing which is as large as the head itself, and relieves the spindle ofbending strain. The saddle carrying this cutter-head is 54 long, and is gibbedto place with large brass shoes. Cutter-head is driven by belt without u.se oflong shafts and sliding keys. The power feed is adjustable, and varies from iper revolution of the cutter-head to 4. Rapid power traverse is arranged formoving head quickly to place, and the two levers operating the feeding and trav-ersing mechanism are interlocked to prevent both being thrown in at the sametime. The table shown in the plate is 8 ft. long by 36 wide, and is adjustableto and from the cutter-head to regulate the amount of feed. Fast and loose pul-leys on countershaft are 24 diameter for 4 belt, and should make 260 revolu-tions per minute. N. B.—These machines are made with various leiigths of travel and differentarrangements for supporting ivork. Sellers & Co., Incorporated, Philadelphia, Pa. 39 Plate No. 114.

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ROTARY PI.ANER FOR ARMOR PLATES. The cutter-head having 75 tools, arranged in circle 50 diameter, will planework 26 ft. long, carried upon two tables, each 8 ft. long by 7 ft. 6 wide.These tables are adjustable to and from the cutter-head by power to regulatedepth of cut ; the head is provided with power traverse at the rate of 20 ft. perminute for adjustment and variable friction feed. Power is conve^ed to head bybelts without use of long shafts and sliding bearings. Machine complete withcountershaft, wrenches, and sample set of cutters. Fast and loose pulleys oncountershaft 24 by 5^2 face, and should make 400 revolutions per minute. Note.—The cutter-head and saddle of this machine were designed to meeta demand for a more powerful and more rigid tool than any in the market, andspecial attention was paid to strength of parts and arrangement and size of bear-ings. IVe make this machine ivith 7arious foiDis of table and fo> bridge-7Cork,arrange it to sivivel. 140 Wm. Sellers &

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Nice Philadelphia Traffic photos

Check out these philadelphia traffic images:

19c – Maier Residence – 2068 S Hobart Blvd – 1905
philadelphia traffic
Image by Kansas Sebastian
19 – Joseph Frederick & Theresa Smith Maier Residence. 2068 S Hobart Blvd. 1905.

At one time the Maier Brewing Company was the largest brewery in Los Angeles. Prior to his death in 1909 from appendicitis, at the age of 32, Joseph F Maier, made arrangements to buy out his father’s former business partner, German immigrant George Zobelein, in 1907, creating the Maier Brewing Company. The funeral procession was said to number 2,000, and marched from his father’s mansion at 1605 S Figuera St, to Rosedale Cemetery, where he’s interred at the family tomb. The brewery itself was located at 500 E Commercial Street, and continued producing beer under its own name until the 1948, when it was bought out by Pabst Brewing Company of Milwaukee. Production ceased at the facility in 1979, and the site is now a parking lot. The Maier mansion on Hobart is in the Mission Revival Style.

West Adams Heights

“Nowadays we scarcely notice the high stone gates which mark the entrances on Hobart, Harvard, and Oxford streets, south of Washington Boulevard. For one thing, the traffic is too heavy, too swift; and then, again, the gates have been obscured by intrusions of shops and stores. At the base of the stone pillars appears the inscription “West Adams Heights.” There was a time when these entranceways were formidable and haughty, for they marked the ways to one of the first elite residential areas in Los Angeles. . . In the unplanned early-day chaos of Los Angeles, West Adams Heights was obviously something very special, an island in an ocean of bungalows—approachable, but withdrawn and reclusive—one of the few surviving examples of planned urban elegance of the turn of the century.”

– Carey McWilliams, “The Evolution of Sugar Hill,” Script, March, 1949: 30.

Today West Adams Heights is still obviously something special. The past sixty years, however, have not been kind. In 1963 the Santa Monica Freeway cut through the heart of West Adams Heights, dividing the neighborhood, obscuring its continuity. In the 1970’s the city paved over the red brick streets and removed the ornate street lighting. After the neighborhood’s zoning was changed to a higher density, overzealous developers claimed several mansions for apartment buildings. Despite these challenges, however, “The Heights,” as the area was once known, has managed to regain some of its former elegance.

The West Adams Heights tract was laid out in 1902, in what was then a wheat field on the western edge of town. Although the freeway now creates an artificial barrier, the original neighborhood boundaries were Adams Boulevard, La Salle Ave, Washington Boulevard, and Western Avenue. Costly improvements were integrated into the development, such as 75-food wide boulevards (which were some of the first contoured streets not to follow the city grid), lots elevated from the sidewalk, ornate street lighting, and large granite monuments with red-brass electroliers at the entrance to every street. These upgrades increased the lot values, which helped ensure the tract would be an enclave for the elite.

One early real estate ad characterized the neighborhood stating: “West Adams Heights needs no introduction to the public: it is already recognized as being far superior to any other tract. Its high and slightly location, its beautiful view of the city and mountains make t a property unequaled by any other in the city.”

The early residents’ were required to sign a detailed restrictive covenant. This hand-written document required property owners to build a “first-class residence,” of at least two stories, costing no less than two-thousand dollars (at a time when a respectable home could be built for a quarter of that amount, including the land), and built no less than thirty-five feet from the property’s primary boundary. Common in early twentieth century, another clause excluded residents from selling or leasing their properties to non-Caucasians.

By the mid 1930’s, however, most of the restrictions had expired. Between 1938 and 1945 many prominent African-Americans began to make “The Heights” their home. According to Carey McWilliams, West Adams Heights became known “Far and wide as the famous Sugar Hill section of Los Angeles,” and enjoyed a clear preeminence over Washington’s smart Le Droit Park, St. Louis’s Enright Street, West Philadelphia, Chicago’s Westchester, and Harlem’s fabulous Sugar Hill.

West Adams Heights, now also known as Sugar Hill, played a major role in the Civil Rights movement in Los Angeles. In 1938 Norman Houston, president of the Golden State Mutual Life Insurance Company, and an African-American, purchased a home at 2211 South Hobart Boulevard. Legal Action from eight homeowners quickly ensued. During that period, other prominent African-Americans began to make Sugar Hill their home – including actress Hattie McDaniels, dentists John and Vada Summerville, actress Louise Beavers, band leader Johnny Otis, and performers Pearl Baily and Ethel Waters, and many more. On December 6, 1945, the “Sugar Hill Cases” were heard before Judge Thurmond Clark, in LA Superior Court. He made history by become the first judge in America to use the 14th Amendment to disallow the enforcement of covenant race restrictions. The Los Angeles Sentinel quoted Judge Clark: “This court is of the opinion that it is time that [African-Americans] are accorded, without reservations and evasions, the full rights guaranteed them under the 14th Amendment.” Gradually, over the last century people of nearly ever background have made historic West Adams their home.

The northern end of West Adams Heights is now protected as part of the Harvard Heights Historic Preservation Overlay Zone (HPOZ). The Historic West Adams area of Los Angeles (which includes West Adams Heights) boasts the highest concentration of turn-of-the-century homes west of the Mississippi, as well as the highest concentration of National Historic Landmarks, National Register of Historic Places, National Historic Districts, State Historic Landmarks, Los Angeles Cultural-Historic Monuments, and Historic Preservation Overlay Zones in the city. The entirety of West Adams Heights should be nominated as a National Register Historic District, for the quality of homes, the prominence of the architects, notoriety of the people who lived in the neighborhood, and the role it played in civil rights.

Perhaps a quote adapted from a fireplace mantle in the Frederick Rindge mansion best symbolizes the optimism which exists in West Adams: “California Shall be Ours as Long as the Stars Remain.”

39c – Cuzner Residence – 2091 S Harvard Blvd
philadelphia traffic
Image by Kansas Sebastian
39 – James M & Mary Newbie Cuzner Residence. 2091 S Harvard Blvd. 1903. Abram M Edelman.

This mansion was commissioned by James M Cuzner, of the Kerchoff-Cuzner Mill and Lumber Company. James only lived at the house for two years, moving to the California Club, where he lived until his death in 1937. In 1905 his son Guy Luke & Irene Isabel Abel Cuzner, took up residence in the 8,000 square foot home. The reception hall is a gallery measuring nearly 30 x 30 feet. Under the grand staircase, through the coat closet, is a secret room, hidden behind a built-in bookcase. In the rear of the house is a large billiard room with a full walk-in safe. The attic at one time contained a massive tin cistern. It remained in the Cuzner family until the early 1940’s. It then became home to the infamous I Am Foundation, whose leaders, Edna and her son Donald Ballard, were convicted of fraud and tax evasion. By the end of the century it was a boarding house for people with mental disabilities. The house was almost lost in 1998, when it was gutted by a mysterious fire, after the family running the boarding house lost the property to foreclosure. The edifice sat empty for several years, and then sold to an artist and architect from Arizona. Thankfully, the house wasn’t raised even though it was more than 50% destroyed. The new owners recognized the house’s historic value, loving the romanticism of the Mission Revival style. Today the house has been fully restored at great expense, including re-installing massive crystal chandeliers.

West Adams Heights

“Nowadays we scarcely notice the high stone gates which mark the entrances on Hobart, Harvard, and Oxford streets, south of Washington Boulevard. For one thing, the traffic is too heavy, too swift; and then, again, the gates have been obscured by intrusions of shops and stores. At the base of the stone pillars appears the inscription “West Adams Heights.” There was a time when these entranceways were formidable and haughty, for they marked the ways to one of the first elite residential areas in Los Angeles. . . In the unplanned early-day chaos of Los Angeles, West Adams Heights was obviously something very special, an island in an ocean of bungalows—approachable, but withdrawn and reclusive—one of the few surviving examples of planned urban elegance of the turn of the century.”

– Carey McWilliams, “The Evolution of Sugar Hill,” Script, March, 1949: 30.

Today West Adams Heights is still obviously something special. The past sixty years, however, have not been kind. In 1963 the Santa Monica Freeway cut through the heart of West Adams Heights, dividing the neighborhood, obscuring its continuity. In the 1970’s the city paved over the red brick streets and removed the ornate street lighting. After the neighborhood’s zoning was changed to a higher density, overzealous developers claimed several mansions for apartment buildings. Despite these challenges, however, “The Heights,” as the area was once known, has managed to regain some of its former elegance.

The West Adams Heights tract was laid out in 1902, in what was then a wheat field on the western edge of town. Although the freeway now creates an artificial barrier, the original neighborhood boundaries were Adams Boulevard, La Salle Ave, Washington Boulevard, and Western Avenue. Costly improvements were integrated into the development, such as 75-food wide boulevards (which were some of the first contoured streets not to follow the city grid), lots elevated from the sidewalk, ornate street lighting, and large granite monuments with red-brass electroliers at the entrance to every street. These upgrades increased the lot values, which helped ensure the tract would be an enclave for the elite.

One early real estate ad characterized the neighborhood stating: “West Adams Heights needs no introduction to the public: it is already recognized as being far superior to any other tract. Its high and slightly location, its beautiful view of the city and mountains make t a property unequaled by any other in the city.”

The early residents’ were required to sign a detailed restrictive covenant. This hand-written document required property owners to build a “first-class residence,” of at least two stories, costing no less than two-thousand dollars (at a time when a respectable home could be built for a quarter of that amount, including the land), and built no less than thirty-five feet from the property’s primary boundary. Common in early twentieth century, another clause excluded residents from selling or leasing their properties to non-Caucasians.

By the mid 1930’s, however, most of the restrictions had expired. Between 1938 and 1945 many prominent African-Americans began to make “The Heights” their home. According to Carey McWilliams, West Adams Heights became known “Far and wide as the famous Sugar Hill section of Los Angeles,” and enjoyed a clear preeminence over Washington’s smart Le Droit Park, St. Louis’s Enright Street, West Philadelphia, Chicago’s Westchester, and Harlem’s fabulous Sugar Hill.

West Adams Heights, now also known as Sugar Hill, played a major role in the Civil Rights movement in Los Angeles. In 1938 Norman Houston, president of the Golden State Mutual Life Insurance Company, and an African-American, purchased a home at 2211 South Hobart Boulevard. Legal Action from eight homeowners quickly ensued. During that period, other prominent African-Americans began to make Sugar Hill their home – including actress Hattie McDaniels, dentists John and Vada Summerville, actress Louise Beavers, band leader Johnny Otis, and performers Pearl Baily and Ethel Waters, and many more. On December 6, 1945, the “Sugar Hill Cases” were heard before Judge Thurmond Clark, in LA Superior Court. He made history by become the first judge in America to use the 14th Amendment to disallow the enforcement of covenant race restrictions. The Los Angeles Sentinel quoted Judge Clark: “This court is of the opinion that it is time that [African-Americans] are accorded, without reservations and evasions, the full rights guaranteed them under the 14th Amendment.” Gradually, over the last century people of nearly ever background have made historic West Adams their home.

The northern end of West Adams Heights is now protected as part of the Harvard Heights Historic Preservation Overlay Zone (HPOZ). The Historic West Adams area of Los Angeles (which includes West Adams Heights) boasts the highest concentration of turn-of-the-century homes west of the Mississippi, as well as the highest concentration of National Historic Landmarks, National Register of Historic Places, National Historic Districts, State Historic Landmarks, Los Angeles Cultural-Historic Monuments, and Historic Preservation Overlay Zones in the city. The entirety of West Adams Heights should be nominated as a National Register Historic District, for the quality of homes, the prominence of the architects, notoriety of the people who lived in the neighborhood, and the role it played in civil rights.

Perhaps a quote adapted from a fireplace mantle in the Frederick Rindge mansion best symbolizes the optimism which exists in West Adams: “California Shall be Ours as Long as the Stars Remain.”

Philly Traffic
philadelphia traffic
Image by poritsky
Stuck in traffic on the way back from the airport.