Tag Archives: Railway

Image from page 814 of “The Street railway journal” (1884)

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Image from page 814 of “The Street railway journal” (1884)
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Identifier: streetrailwayjo231904newy
Title: The Street railway journal
Year: 1884 (1880s)
Authors:
Subjects: Street-railroads Electric railroads Transportation
Publisher: New York : McGraw Pub. Co.
Contributing Library: Smithsonian Libraries
Digitizing Sponsor: Smithsonian Libraries

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rawas County. The towns are 4 miles apart, and localservice separate from the interurban line is given betweenthem. Uhrichsville is a railroad and coal center. The population of the cities and towns touched by the systemaccording to the latest census is shown in the accompanyingtable: CANTON-AKRON KAILWAY Akron 42,728 Canton 30.667 Massillon n,944 CANTON & NEW PHILADELPHIA RAILWAY Navarre 936 Beach City 364 Strasburg 461 Canal Dover 5.422 New Philadelphia 6,213 TUSCARAWAS TRACTION COMPANY Midvale 491 Tuscarawas 412 Uhrichsville 4.582 104,247 Tributary population 35.000 The Canton-Akron Railway enters Akron over the tracks ofthe Northern Ohio Traction & Light Company from EastAkron. Cars operate to the passenger station of the NorthernOhio Traction & Light Company, where they make direct con-nection with the cars of that company for Cleveland. Ticketsare sold clear through over both roads, a coupon form of ticketbeing used, giving each road its regular fare. The traffic ar-

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LIXE VIEW—CANTON-NEW PHILADELPHIA RAILWAY rangement with the Northern Ohio Traction & Light Companyis on the Cleveland plan. The city crew takes the interurbancar at the city limits and collects and keeps all the city fares,and the Northern Ohio Company pays the Canton-Akron Com-pany at the rate of 2 cents per car mile for the use of the carswhile on its tracks. The Canton-Akron Company gives hourlyheadway between Akron and Massillon; the Canton-NewPhiladelphia Company gives hourly headway between Massillonand New Philadelphia, and the Tuscarawas Traction Companyhourly headway between Canal Dover and Uhrichsville. Thecars connect so that a through trip is possible over all threelines without delays. Tickets are sold clear through, coupontickets being used. In Canton the city cars operate on a 10-minute headway over five routes, all cars passing the interurban station, which, with the general offices of the companies, islocated in the basement of the Court House Building, facingC

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# 1526 Baldwin Locomotive
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The first display reads:

# 1526 Baldwin Locomotive

"The Queen of the Frisco Railroad rolled into Lawton, Oklahoma on Friday, July 7, 1961 on her last journey."

Baldwin Locomotive Works in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania is one of the most successful builders of locomotives in the world. The company was founded by Matthias W. Baldwin, a jeweler who opened and operated a machine shop. Prior to 1830, the Philadelphia Museum commissioned him to build a miniature locomotive to help demonstrate the concept of steam locomotive technology. Completed in 1831, the success of the minature model resulted in his first order for a full sized locomotive by the Philadelphia, Germantown and Norristown Railroad which was completed in 1832. His business boomed at the turn of the century, when demand for locomotives expanded.

The second display reads:

Whyte Wheel Classification

F.M. Whyte, a mechanical engineer, initiated a way to classify the number of wheels each locomotive steam engine had. This system used in the 20th century, is still being used today.

A zero classification for the front wheels indicates an engine that pulls at slow speeds. Two front wheels signify medium speeds. This locomotive has four front wheels, two on each side. It tells us the engine is used for high speed service, such as passenger service and priority weight. When a larger firebox is pulled by the locomotive, it needs more trailing wheels to carry the load.

Engine 1526: Configuration 4-8-2

oo-OOOO-o

4 – The first number represents the number of small wheels in front of the locomotive, called leading or pilot wheels. These wheels give not only support but stability to the cylinders and smoke box.

8 – The second number represents the number of wheels that actually drive and support the massive weight of the locomotive. These wheels, called driving wheels, are larger than the pilot or trailing wheels.

2 – The third number represents the number of wheels that support the weight of the boiler firebox in the cab. These wheels are called trailing wheels.

The final display reads:

St. Louis – San Francisco Mountains Locomotives

The "Frisco"

The St. Louis – San Francisco Railway bought a total of thirty 4-8-2s from the Baldwin Locomotive Works to be used in passenger service. Fifteen (road numbers 1500 through 1514) were delivered in 1923, five (road numbers 1515 through 1519) came in 1925 and the final ten (road numbers 1520 through 1529) arrived in 1926.

There are six surviving SLSF "Mountains" Locomotives:

– 1501 at a city park in Rolla, MO
– 1519 at the Railroad Museum of NW Oklahoma in Enid, OK
– 1522 at the Museum of Transportation in St. Louis, MO
– 1526 at the Museum of the Great Plains in Lawton, OK
– 1527 at Spring Hill Park in Mobile, AL
– 1529 at Frisco Park in Amory, MS

Specifications for the 1526 Locomotive:

Road Numbers / Year Built / Builder / Locomotive Weight
1500 – 1514 / 1923 / Baldwin / 339,800 lbs.
1515 – 1519 / 1925 / Baldwin / 342,200 lbs.
1520 – 1529 / 1926 / Baldwin / 260,890 lbs.

Wheel Arrangement: 4-8-2
Grate Area: 70.5 square feet
Length Drivers: 88′ 6"
Cylinders: (2) 28" dia. x 28" stroke
Weight on Drivers: 248,520 lbs.
Boiler Pressure: 210 psi
Tractive Effort: 56,800 lbs.
Tender Capacity: Water- 11,700 gallons / Oil- 4,500 gallons
Total Locomotive Weight: 360,890 lbs.
Locomotive & Tender Weight: 958,890 lbs.
Aux. Tender Capacity: 13,000 gallons of water

Taken July 7th, 2012.

Kawasaki Trolleys at Callowhill Depot
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Image from page 318 of “The Street railway journal” (1884)

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Image from page 318 of “The Street railway journal” (1884)
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Identifier: streetrailwayjo191902newy
Title: The Street railway journal
Year: 1884 (1880s)
Authors:
Subjects: Street-railroads Electric railroads Transportation
Publisher: New York : McGraw Pub. Co.
Contributing Library: Smithsonian Libraries
Digitizing Sponsor: Smithsonian Libraries

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t, and that there is a hingingbreak in the coaming, plank-sheer and upper strake, which permitof easy ingress and egress, so that the boat can be loaded andunloaded with rapidity, thus avoiding any unnecessary delays.The launch was operated with great success by the Omaha &Council Bluffs Railway last summer, and proved a good invest- NAME PLATEMACHINE March i, 1902.] STREET RAILWAY JOURNAL. ment. The Electric Launch Company of Bayonne City, N. J.,builder of this boat, has recently adopted for its pleasure launchesthe new lightweight type of battery, which is about 35 per cent,lighter in weight than that hitherto used for marine purposes. ELECTRIC FOUNTAINSLike the electric launch, this is an amusement which is particu-larly suitable for street railway parks, from the fact that electriccurrent for the operation of the fountain is always available, andany mechanic who can understand the handling of a railway motoris sufficiently adept to understand the electrical requirements of the

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TWO VARIETIES OF ELECTRIC FOUNTAINS fountain apparatus. From the time that the electric fountainestablished its reputation as a popular amusement at the WorldsFair in Chicago, in 1893, it has kept a foremost place in the listof popular and decorative effects at amusement resorts. Thishas been due largely to the efforts of the Darlington ElectricFountain & Supply Company, of Philadelphia, which is the fore-most if not practically the only builder of these fountains in thiscountry, and which has made a specialty of the subject, so that itnow builds fountains suitable for the largest parks or for smallerenterprises, and even, if requested, small enough for banquettables. The variety of displays is almost limitless, as by chang-ing the colors, direction and shape of the jets an endless varietyin colors and displays can be secured. In this way an audience the Chicago chute, which was built in 1894, were about ,000.Chutes in Baltimore, Atlantic City, Atlanta, San Francisco andelsewhe

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Image from page 60 of “American railway transportation” (1908)
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Identifier: americanrailwayt1908john
Title: American railway transportation
Year: 1908 (1900s)
Authors: Johnson, Emory R. (Emory Richard), 1864-1950
Subjects: Railroads Railroads and state
Publisher: New York, D. Appleton and company
Contributing Library: Mugar Memorial Library, Boston University
Digitizing Sponsor: Boston University

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li^i Uiiai liDAD vc*ji2 iiifj) ^^iijAX l^A^•l{I3»^2, From Philadelphia to Pittsburgh, THROUGH IN 3i DAYS: -».VO BV STE^.^ BO^TS, CIRBXMJVG THE V^TiTEO STATES Jit.tMMf% From PIlTKBlIRCiH lo LOIIISVIUE

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Image from page 1186 of “The Street railway journal” (1884)

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Image from page 1186 of “The Street railway journal” (1884)
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Identifier: streetrailwayjo181901newy
Title: The Street railway journal
Year: 1884 (1880s)
Authors:
Subjects: Street-railroads Electric railroads Transportation
Publisher: New York : McGraw Pub. Co.
Contributing Library: Smithsonian Libraries
Digitizing Sponsor: Smithsonian Libraries

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fg. Co. H. W. Johns Mfg. Co. Okonite Co. Bethlehem Iron Co. Eugene Munsell & Co. Garton-Daniels Electric Co. McCardeU, West & Co. Robert W. BlackweU. Safety Third Rail Electric Co. Standard Air Brake Co. Dick, Kerr & Co. Risdon Iron Works. E. H. Cadiot & Co. Lorain Steel Co. Westinghouse Electric & Mfg. Co.General Electric Co.Jackson & Sharp Co.Peckham Truck Co.Baltimore Car Wheel Co.American Metal Co. Lewisohn Bros.Carnegie Steel Co.John Stephenson Co.Baldwin Locomotive Works.Brown Hoisting & Convejdng Machine Co.J. G. BriU Co. Christensen Engineering Co.Berlin Iron Bridge Co.B. F. Sturtevant Co.Riter-Conley Mfg. Co.Ball & Wood Co.A. L. Ide & Sons.Springfield Mfg. Co.Edwin Harrington Son & Co.J. A. Fay & Egan Co.Worthington Pump Co.Babcock & Wilcox Co.Westinghouse Alr-Brake Co.Manning, Maxwell & Moore. LIEBER CODE CO., 2 and 4 STONE STREET 20 BUCKLERSBURY, NEW YORK. LONDON, E.G. STREET RAILWAY JOURNAL. 239 ..Alw^yj* in Se&.son..

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SECTIONAL VIEW Aly/^yj* Ventile^ting DAY AND NIGHT RAIN OR SHINE Also VENTILATORS FOR EXPORT Power Houses and Buildings Ventilated AT LITTLE COST U/E have equipped Power Houses and Buildings all overthe world—suck as the KOLGOORLIE TRAMWAY CO., . . AustraliaST. CH.-RLES STREET RY. CO., . New OrleansGALVESTON CITY RY. CO., . Galveston, TexasPEEKSKILL LIGHTING & R.R. CO., Peekskill, N. YYOUNGSTOWN GAS & ELEC. CO., Youngstown, O. AND MANY OTHERS We luill be pleased to send you our new catalogue and sample andgive you an estimate. PANCOAST INTERNATIONAL VENTILATOR CO. manufacturers IMPROVED TAN-COAST VENTILATORSSalesroom and Office. 223 and 225 SOUTH FIFTH ST.. PHILADELPHIA Offices, NEW YORK and LONDON ELECTRIC MOTOR AND GENERATOR VENTILATING CO. 421 Chestnut Street, Philadelphia. Our new ventilator is a simple and efiicient device for carrying coldair direct to the motor case, fr< m the hood through hose under car. orfrom the funnel at top as may be preferrtd. Will vemilate

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Image from page 807 of “The Street railway journal” (1884)
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Identifier: streetrailwayjo291907newy
Title: The Street railway journal
Year: 1884 (1880s)
Authors:
Subjects: Street-railroads Electric railroads Transportation
Publisher: New York : McGraw Pub. Co.
Contributing Library: Smithsonian Libraries
Digitizing Sponsor: Smithsonian Libraries

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THE LIMA CAR HOUSE, WITH GATES BETWEEN THE TRACKS water which may accumulate in the pits,as there are no public drains and thereis no other way of accomplishing this.A large room is provided for the motor-men and conductors, and the office pro-vides ample space for the manager, elec-trical and civil engineers, traffic manager,accountant, cashier, etc. Adjoining thecar house is a house for the car housesuperintendent. The cars are of the eight-bench opentype, fully described in the Street Rail-way Journal of April 7, 1906. As thegovermnent requires the use of airbrakes, it was found necessary to placethe compressor under one end of theseats and the tank under the other. Thebrake cylinder is also placed under oneend of the car. The trucks are of thesolid steel Columbian type, 6 ft. 6 ins.wheel base. G. E. No. 54 double motorequipments are used on all these cars.

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Street Uy.Journal PLAN OF CAR HOUSE, SHOP AND OFFICE BUILDINGS May 4, 1907.] STREET RAILWAY JOURNAL. 795 At present there are forty-eight-bench cars, and in additiontwo sprinklers, two meat cars and a work car with derrick.The G. E. No. 80 double motor equipment is used on thelatter cars. Twenty additional eight-bench open cars havealready been ordered and will be re-quired as soon as received. The tramway system was designed bythe well-known American engineer, A.W. McLimont, who has also directedthe installation. The entire electricalequipment was supplied by the GeneralElectric Company; the open cars by theStephenson works of the J. G. Brill Com-pany, of Philadelphia; the trutks andspecial cars by the McGuire-CummingsCompany, of Chicago, and the poles,brackets, etc., by the Elmer P. MorrisCompany, of New York. All of theorders were placed through the firm ofW. R. Grace & Company, of New York. *^^ favor of a double-jointed current collector very similar tothat used on the same co

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Image from page 9 of “Ceremonies upon the completion of the monument erected by the Pennsylvania Railroad Company at Bordentown, New Jersey, to mark the first piece of track laid between New York and Philadelphia, 1831, November 12, 1891” (1891)
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Identifier: ceremoniesupon00penn
Title: Ceremonies upon the completion of the monument erected by the Pennsylvania Railroad Company at Bordentown, New Jersey, to mark the first piece of track laid between New York and Philadelphia, 1831, November 12, 1891
Year: 1891 (1890s)
Authors: PENNSYLVANIA RAILROAD CO
Subjects: Camden and Amboy Railroad and Transportation Company
Publisher: Washington, D.C., William F. Roberts
Contributing Library: Smithsonian Libraries
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r R. R. and Transportation Co., 85 Philadelphia and Trenton R. R. Co., . . . . 87 89 ev Jersey Co., 90 New Jersey Controlled by Pennsylvania R. R. 91 from John Stevens Concerning Railroads in Pennsyl- 93 ts Concerning the Celebration, . . . . 95 ne of the Baltimore and Susquehanna R. R., . .101 ■ ILLUSTRATIONS..lent at Bordentown, . . Ceremonies and Program, He of Lei rt L. Stevens Ordering the First ig Cross Section and Plan, >inotive John Bull, lid Arch at Bordentown, and lahway and Jersey City, 1841, . Frontispiece facing page ii iv 6 2934 4244

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1 Ceremonies upon the Completion OF THE MS NUMENT ERECTED BY THE PENNSYLVANIA RAILROAD QO AT FjORDENTOWN, NEW JERSEY, TO MARK THE FIRST PIECE OFTRACK LAID BETWEEN NEWYORK AND PHILADELPHIA, I 83 I, November 12, 1891. PUBLISHED FOR THE PENNSYLVANIA RAILROAD CO. BY GEDNEV & ROBERTS, WASHINGTON, D. C.

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Image from page 10 of “Pleasant places on the Philadelphia & Reading railway ..” (1901)

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Image from page 10 of “Pleasant places on the Philadelphia & Reading railway ..” (1901)
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Identifier: pleasantplaceson01phil
Title: Pleasant places on the Philadelphia & Reading railway ..
Year: 1901 (1900s)
Authors: Philadelphia & Reading Railroad Co
Subjects:
Publisher: [Philadelphia]
Contributing Library: The Library of Congress
Digitizing Sponsor: The Library of Congress

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ce Con-gress to preserve the entire field. The single known grave of the thou-sands buried at Valley Forge, that of Lieutenant John Waterman, has justbeen marked by a splendid shaft. Aside from the absorbing historic interest of this place, the surround-ing neighborhood, which is traversed by numerous fine roads and embel-lished with beautiful country seats, makes it a charming location for thesummer. The drive up the valley beside Forge Creek to the highlandsbeyond is especially attractive. The Washington Inn, with its Annex, jointly conducted by F. W.Focht, accommodates twenty guests, rates .00 to .00. It is near thestation, the river and Washingtons headquarters. Livery stable andboats. The Mansion House, John L. Hay, has accommodations for twentypersons, rates .00. Splendid fishing and boating. Beech Farm, Mrs. Sloan, can take twelve persons at .00. CYCLING.—Via King ot Prussia and Gulf Mills to Belmont Drive. Beautiful runup creek to Berwyn. Nutts road to Phoenixville.

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PHCENIXVILLE, PA. Twenty-eight miles. Fare, 70 cents; Excursion, .08. Package Tickets, 10 for .85; 26-trip Commutation Ticket, .14; loo-trip Commutation Ticket, .90; 60-trip MonthlyTicket, .95; 180-trip Quarterly Ticket, .55. Thirteen trains each way on week-days. Six trains each way on Sundays. This busy town has dehghtful surroundings, good fishing and shoot-ing, good schools, opera house and varied diversions. The Hotel Columbia, F. H. Ecock, can accommodate fifty boarders,rates .00. The Jefferson Hotel, Joseph McGlinchy, a modern house, and Wash-ington Hotel, Fred Wall, each have room for thirty persons at .00.The General Pike Hotel, Chas. Reimer, takes thirty guests at .50. Stab-ling at all hotels. The Phcenix Hotel, J. F. Wall, can take fifty persons, at .00. TheMansion House, W. L. Rowland, can take thirty, and the PennsylvaniaHouse fifty guests. Rates at each place, .00; and the Hotel Chester,I. B. Reinert, will accommodate fifteen persons at .00.

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Image from page 406 of “The official guide book to Philadelphia..” (1876)
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Identifier: officialguideboo00west
Title: The official guide book to Philadelphia..
Year: 1876 (1870s)
Authors: Westcott, Thompson
Subjects:
Publisher: Philadelphia, Porter and Coates
Contributing Library: The Library of Congress
Digitizing Sponsor: The Library of Congress

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ON THE WISSAHICKON DRIVE. roadway and the stream, presenting at every turn scenes ofbeauty to delight the observer. There are several Park hotelsupon the route—Wissahickon Hall, Maple Spring, ValleyGreen and Indian Rock hotels. The road runs from theSchuylkill on the west and south side of the stream. Itcrosses just beyond Washington Rock near the HermitsGlen and Kelpius Spring, places dedicated to the memoryof ascetic religious enthusiasts, who in the early days of the

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A GlilMPSE OF THE WISSAHICKON. 362 FAIRMOUNT PARK. colony of Pennsylvania came from Germany and settleddown to pious meditation and study on the banks of theromantic stream. Among these was John Kelpius, a scholar

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View from hotel room on 9th floor
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Image from page 1392 of “Electric railway journal” (1908)

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Image from page 1392 of “Electric railway journal” (1908)
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Identifier: electricrailway511918newy
Title: Electric railway journal
Year: 1908 (1900s)
Authors:
Subjects: Electric railroads
Publisher: [New York] McGraw Hill Pub. Co
Contributing Library: Smithsonian Libraries
Digitizing Sponsor: Smithsonian Libraries

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Car Wheel Borer Electric Travelling Cranes – Steam Hammers MILES – BEMENT- POND CO. GENERAL OFFICES, 111 BROADWAY,NEW YORK OFFICES AND AGENCIES—Boston: 93-95 Oliver St. Philadelphia: 405 N. 21st St. Pittsburgh: Frick Bldg. Cleveland, O.: The Niles Tool Works Co., 730 Superior Ave. Hamilton, O.: The Niles Tool Works Co. Cincinnati: The Niles Tool Works Co., 338 W. Fourth St.Detroit: Kerr Bldg. Chicago: 571 W. Washington Blvd. St. Louis: 510 N. Third St. Birmingham, Ala.: 2015 First Ave. San Fran-cisco: 16 to 18 Fremont St. London, Eng.: 25 Victoria St., S. W. For Colorado, Utah, Wyoming and New Mexico: Hendrie &Bolthoff Manufacturing & Supply Co., Denver. For Canada: The John Bertram & Sons Co., Ltd., Dundas. Montreal, Toronto, Winnipeg, Vancouver. January 5, 1918 ELECTRIC RAILWAY JOURNAL 89 Longer Life

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for the Vital Parts of Your Car Materials of great durability are essential to protect the vital parts of electriccars against any and all destructive influences. Each type of service requires a specific varnish or compound to meet its specificrequirements and no other will serve, STANDARD INSULATING SPECIALTIES embrace a scientific Standard forEVERY NEED. Air Drying Voltalac, Elastic Voltalac, Baking Voltalac, Electric Black Finish,Standard Black Finishing and Standard Clear Insulating Varnish. Impregnite for Railway Field Coils Manufactured by J NEW YORK fCHICAGO WW LONDON SAN FRANCISCO PARIS BRUSSELS MELBOURNEINTERNATIONAL VARNISH CO. Limited TORONTOLARGEST IN. THE WORLD AND FIRST TO ESTABLISH DEFINITE QUALITY STANDARDS

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Image from page 26 of “The National Civic Federation review” (1905)
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Identifier: nationalcivicfed15nati
Title: The National Civic Federation review
Year: 1905 (1900s)
Authors: National Civic Federation
Subjects: Labor and laboring classes
Publisher: New York : [The Federation]
Contributing Library: University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign
Digitizing Sponsor: University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign

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s of Mr. Mosely, an Englishcapitalist. On their arrival here the Civic Federationundertook the task of planning their itinerary, of ap-pointing a committee to attend them in their travels,and of seeing to it that they should be introduced inthe various cities under favorable auspices. Whilesome of the members also made independent trips, theentire party visited Niagara, Buffalo, Cleveland,Chicago. Dayton, Pittsburg, Philadelphia, Washing-ton and New York. In this city they attended the Civic Federations conference of last December, con-tributing to its success by their impromptu discus-sions, fortified as they were by fresh facts from theirexperience at home and in this country. The members arrived from England in small par-ties at the ports of Philadelphia, New York, Boston,and Quebec, on or about Nov. 8, and, assembling atNiagara Falls, Nov. 12, for the most part journeyedafterward in a body. As they sailed for England Dec.19-25, their general observations were necessarily hur-ried.

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(Photographed at Niagara Falls Power Plant.) Upper Row (from left to right)—Messis. Lapping,Dyson, Wilkie. Hornldge, MaeDonald. In Front—Mr. Samuel li. Donnelly (TypographicalUnion), New York. Second Row—Messrs. Coffey. Cummirgs Pnwe–man Taylor, Deller, Holmshaw, Steadman. Wilkin-son, Sutherland (Central News Agency), Flynn. Third Row—Messrs. Walls. Crawford. Ham. Ash-ton, Marks (President National Association of Cloth-iers, United States), Mosely, Jones, Kelly, Cox,Barnes. 2 NATIONAL CIVIC FEDERATION June, 1903. The members of the commission were:Thos. Ashton, Amalgamated Association of Opera-tive Cotton Spinn:rs; G. N. Barnes, Amalgamated Society of Engineers; C. W. Bowerman, London Society of Compositors;W. Coffey, London Consolidated Society of Jour-neymen Bookbinders; Jas. Cox, Associated Iron and Steel Workers ofGreat Britain; H. Crawford, General Union of Operative Carpen-ters and Joiners; D. C. Cummings, United Society of Boiler Makersand Iron Shipbuilders; . M. Delie

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Image from page 288 of “A brief history of the Twenty-Eighth Regiment New York State Volunteers, First Brigade, First Division, Twelfth Corps, Army of the Potomac, from the author’s diary and official reports. With the muster-roll of the regiment … and
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Identifier: briefhistoryoftw00boyc
Title: A brief history of the Twenty-Eighth Regiment New York State Volunteers, First Brigade, First Division, Twelfth Corps, Army of the Potomac, from the author’s diary and official reports. With the muster-roll of the regiment … and … with the report of proceedings of the thirty-fifth annual reunion held at Albion, New York, May 22, 1896
Year: 1896 (1890s)
Authors: Boyce, Charles William, 1842-
Subjects: United States. Army. New York Infantry Regiment, 28th (1861-1863)
Publisher: [Buffalo, The Matthews-Northrup co.]
Contributing Library: Allen County Public Library Genealogy Center
Digitizing Sponsor: Internet Archive

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Day 6: Torch Relay Will Visit Gloucester Cathedral and Severn Valley Railway on Journey from Cheltenham to Worcester


(PRWEB) May 24, 2012

On Thursday 24 May the London 2012 Olympic Torch Relay presented by Coca-Cola, Lloyds TSB and Samsung will travel from Cheltenham to Worcester. The Olympic Flame will travel 99.05 miles through 19 communities.


On Day 6 the Torch Relay will travel 99.05 miles

119 inspirational Torchbearers will carry the Flame

Evening celebration to take place at Worcester County Cricket Ground

Images from the day will be available to download from here throughout the day

119 Torchbearers will carry the Flame before it arrives at the Evening Celebration in Worcester where a cauldron will be lit to mark the culmination of the days festivities. After the celebrations have finished, the Flame will be transferred to a lantern and it will stay in Worcester overnight.

On Day 6 the Flame will be carried through the following communities:

Gloucester, Maisemore, Hartpury, Corse and Staunton, Ledbury, Bartestree, Lugwardine, Hereford, Leominster, Ludlow, Clee Hill, Cleobury Mortimer, Far Forest, Callow Hill, Bewdley, Kidderminster, Droitwitch Spa, Fernhill Heath and Worcester.

During the day the Flame will also visit a number of iconic landmarks including:

Gloucester Docks, where the Flame will be carried by 19-year-old George Livingstone-Thompson from Gloucester, who was nominated through the Coca-Cola Future Flames programme for his voluntary work for people with disabilities.

Gloucester Cathedral, where the Flame will be carried by aspiring fencer, Sophie Williams, who is 21-years-old from Cornwall, who was nominated for her extraordinary progress in the last two years.

Severn Valley Railway, where the Flame will be carried on the train from Bewdley to Kidderminster by 43-year-old Christopher Stokes from Kidderminster.

Other Torchbearers during the day will include:

Sharron Davies, who is carrying the Flame in Leominster in recognition of her Olympic Swimming career. Sharron has remained in the public eye as a commentator, presenter and active charity worker. She pioneered her own annual swimming event, Swim for Life, which involves over 2000 pools nationwide and helps raise money for many different causes.

Yasmin Boff, 12, from Evesham and carrying the Flame in Gloucester. Yasmin, who was nominated through the LOCOG campaign, is an exceptional talented young swimmer. Last year she broke the UK age record for the 50m backstroke and has won countless medals and trophies. She was recently selected to train with the Elite 2 swimming squad in Coventry and with the support and commitment of her family, she now trains there five times a week.

Robert Powell, 60, from Hereford, was nominated through the Lloyds TSB campaign. Robert is carrying the Flame in Hereford and has been selected thanks to his involvement with MS Society. Robert chairs his local MS Society branch and has raised tens of thousands of pounds through running and cycling.

Lucy Fellows, 15, from Worcestershire carrying the Flame in Ludlow. Despite suffering from a rare genetic condition called Ehlers Danlos Syndrome, Lucy is a full-time carer for her mother who suffers from a severe form of her own condition. Beyond being a carer, Lucys an A* student, an active member of the local community within her Girl Guides and Rangers, as well as a member of a local wildlife group. Lucy was nominated through the Samsung campaign.

Stuart Woodburn, 30, from Worcestershire and carrying the Flame in Ledbury. Stuart, who was nominated the through the LOCOG campaign, has worked at Aston Fields for four years, and works as a Year 5 form teacher as well as teaching: Director of KS2 English, Maths, P.E and HSSE (History, Geography and Religious Education). Throughout his career at our school, he’s received outstanding performance from the head teacher and works to, not only support pupils and support other staff, but also inspire everyone at school, especially in sport.

Thomas Neathway, 28, from Worcestershire was nominated by Worcester City Council through the LOCOG campaign. Thomas, who will carry the Flame in Worcester, joined the Parachute Regiment in 2001 and is a veteran of multiple tours of Northern Ireland, Iraq & Afghanistan. On his last Afghan tour in 2008, Tom triggered a booby trap while covering his platoon moving forward. The blast took off both his feet and the severity of his wounds led to amputation of both legs and one arm.

The evening celebration will take place at Worcester County Cricket Ground from 4pm. The evening celebration will feature a variety of entertainment staged by LOCOG and the three Presenting Partners of the London 2012 Olympic Torch Relay – Coca-Cola, Lloyds TSB and Samsung.

The line-up includes music from Labrinth, a dance troupe who will provide a unique fusion of street performance, theatre and sport and dance act Twist and Pulse. A locally recruited community choir will also perform.

Towards the end of the two-hour show, the last Torchbearer of the day – Sally Flood, from Bromsgrove who was nominated for her charity work – will light a celebration cauldron on stage at the event which will enable the Olympic Flame to be seen by the audience.

The Olympic Torch Relay will also include exciting moments with extreme heights, high speeds and breath-taking spectacles and the Flame will be travelling by different methods of transport including horseback, bicycle, tram and steam-train. Every county in England and every Local Authority area in Scotland, Northern Ireland and Wales will host the Olympic Flame, with visits reaching as far north as Lerwick in Scotland to St Helier in the south, Lowestoft in the east and Enniskillen in the west. Many thousands of people are expected to welcome the Olympic Flame along the route each day and celebrate the achievements of the Torchbearers in parks, squares and streets right around the UK.

The convoy travelling with the Flame consists of 14 core vehicles, including a pilot car, Torchbearer drop-off and pick-up shuttles, Presenting Partner vehicles, a media vehicle, a command car and security vehicles. The lead convoy, including the Presenting Partner vehicles, will provide entertainment for the crowds. The Torchbearer will follow some 5 to 7 minutes later.

A crew of approximately 350 people will be working each day of the Relay. Core teams of LOCOG staff, the Metropolitan Police Torch Security Team, Presenting Partners, host Police Forces and host Local Authorities will be working together throughout the 70 days.

James Williams, Director, Olympic Torch Relay, The Coca-Cola Company, said: Were five days into what is shaping up to be an incredible 70 day journey around the UK. Were so excited to join with the crowds lining the streets to celebrate our inspirational Coca-Cola Future Flames as they carry the Olympic Flame through their local communities, for example today George Livingstone-Thompson will run in Gloucester. Were continuing to spread the magic of London 2012 across the United Kingdom, and will be getting everyone to Move to the Beat tonight as we bring Labrinth to the stage in Worcester.

Sally Hancock, Director, 2012 Partnership at Lloyds Banking Group, said: The Olympic Torch Relay will mark the moment when every corner of the UK will start to feel the excitement of London 2012. Lloyds TSB is creating as many opportunities as possible for people to get involved as the Olympic Flame passes their front doors. Were calling on everyone to come and line the streets to cheer on their local Lloyds TSB Torchbearers and celebrate with our troupe of performers the Flame Followers who will use a unique fusion of performance to bring the excitement of the Flame to communities.

Mr Sunny Hwang, Vice President & Head of Global Sports Marketing, Samsung Electronics, said: Samsung is delighted to be a Presenting Partner of the Olympic Torch

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