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Image from page 399 of “Rambles in the path of the steam-horse. An off-hand olla podrida, embracing a general historical and descriptive view of the scenery, agricultural and mineral resources, and prominent features of the travelled route from Baltimore

A few nice philadelphia travel company images I found:

Image from page 399 of “Rambles in the path of the steam-horse. An off-hand olla podrida, embracing a general historical and descriptive view of the scenery, agricultural and mineral resources, and prominent features of the travelled route from Baltimore
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Identifier: ramblesinpathofs00bowe
Title: Rambles in the path of the steam-horse. An off-hand olla podrida, embracing a general historical and descriptive view of the scenery, agricultural and mineral resources, and prominent features of the travelled route from Baltimore to Harper’s Ferry, Cumberland, Wheeling, Cincinnati, and Louisville
Year: 1855 (1850s)
Authors: Bowen, Eli, b. 1824
Subjects: Baltimore and Ohio Railroad Company
Publisher: Philadelphia, W. Bromwell and W. W. Smith Baltimore, S. B. Hickcox, agent
Contributing Library: West Virginia University Libraries
Digitizing Sponsor: Lyrasis Members and Sloan Foundation

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r thebuilding and repair of steamboats, is now being erected on the oppositeside of the Scioto. The town contains numerous iron and other manufac-tories; and is in the vicinity of large beds of iron and coal. The present 882 KAMBLES IN THE PATH OF THE STEAM HOESE. Maysville. population is about five thousand. The Scioto river is about two hundredmiles to its source, but is not navigable with steam farther than Chilli-cothe, forty miles from Portsmouth, and thus far only with small boats.Chillicothe was laid out into a town in 1796, and subsequently becamethe capital of the State. Columbus, however, is now the seat of govern-ment. It is situated in the heart of the richest agricultural region of theState, and does an extensive trade in flour, pork-packing, &c. Presentpopulation nearly seven thousand. Columbus, the capital of the State, issituated fifty miles further up the Scioto, being ninety miles distant fromPortsmouth. It has a population of over seventeen thousand, and is con-

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Maysville. nected by railway and canal, with every section of the United States.Besides the immediate capital buildings, it contains a State LunaticHospital, an Asylum for the Blind, one for the Deaf and Dumb, and theOhio Penitentiary. Forty years ago the ground upon which this beautfulcity now stands, was a perfect wilderness, whose solitudes had not yetbeen broken by the march of civilisation. Maysville, the county seat of Massu, is one of the oldest and hand-somest cities in Kentucky. The situation, like that of Portsmouth, iselevated, commanding and picturesque ;—a range of bold and verdanthighlands, rising immediately behind it, and rendering its appearancefrom the boats passing up and down the river, extremely attractive.Thus confined to a narrow belt, between the river and the surroundinghills, the town is closely and compactly built, and gives every indicationof prosperity and industry. It is the entrepot of goods and produce im- RAMBLES m THE PATH OF THE STEAM HOESE. 883 Ci

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Image from page 15 of “The 1910 trip of the H.M.M.B.A. to California and the Pacific coast” (1911)
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Identifier: 1910tripofhmmbat00jame
Title: The 1910 trip of the H.M.M.B.A. to California and the Pacific coast
Year: 1911 (1910s)
Authors: James, George Wharton, 1858-1923
Subjects: Hotel Men’s Mutual Benefit Association Hotels
Publisher: San Francisco, Press of Bolte & Braden company
Contributing Library: The Library of Congress
Digitizing Sponsor: Sloan Foundation

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. Each road traversedassigned a passenger agent to accompany the party until he was succeededby the official representative of the next railway, the roads over which theXew York M. M. M. 1!. A. special traveled to Los .Angeles and San l-ran-ciseo being as follows: Xew York to ^^a<llin<ton. Central R. R. of Xew 10 THE 1010 TRIP ()F THE H. M. M. W. A. Jersey, Philadelphia «Sc Reading, and Baltimore & Ohio. Washington toXew Orleans, Southern R. R., X. & W. R. R.. A. G. S. R. R.. and O. & C.Route. Xew Orleans to San Francisco to Denver, Southern Pacific R. R.Chicago to Xew York, Lake Shore and Xew York Central. In the Crescent City Arriving at the Terminal Station in Xew Orleans, the party was metbv a committee of local hotelmcn and others, headed hv Mr. Theodore

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Tlie Original Six nt the New Yorl^ Delegation, who visited Californiawith the H. M. .M. B. A. in 18 6. Reading from left to right: Charles F.I^arzalere, Mrs. Wood, John Burke, E. M. Tiernev, Mrs. Tiernev, Mr.Wood. Grunewald. of the fine hostelry of that name, and including Russell Blakely.St. Charles Hotel, Mrs. Blakely and Miss Blakely; Justin Denechaud,Denechaud Hotel; Mr. and Mrs. L. A. Denechaud and Miss Juanita Dene-chaud ; Senator Voegtle, Cosmopolitan Hotel; Zilrs. oegtle; A. V. Mon-teleone and J. D. Kennedy, Monteleone Hotel; Councilman and Mrs.OConnor, Mrs. R. Miller, Charles A. Hartwell, Hart D. Xewman, GeorgeU. Dunbar, A. A. Aschaffenberg, A. J. Gelpi, T. Tranchina, CouncilmanJohn Frawley, Councilman Thomas Cunningham and Mr. Mayer. TO CALIFORNIA AND THE PACIFIC COAST 11 At the Filtration Plant Those who joined the ]iarty at the filtration plant were City AttorneyI. I). Moore and Miss Moore, and Superintendent Earl, of the Water andSewerai^e Board. Mr. Earl personally cond

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Image from page 196 of “Summer excursion routes and rates. Delaware, Lackawanna and western railroad company. 1893 ..” (1893)
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Identifier: summerexcursionr00delaw
Title: Summer excursion routes and rates. Delaware, Lackawanna and western railroad company. 1893 ..
Year: 1893 (1890s)
Authors: Delaware, Lackawanna and western railroad company. [from old catalog] Johnson, William Henry, [from old catalog] comp
Subjects:
Publisher: [New York, Printed by Livingston Middleditch co.
Contributing Library: The Library of Congress
Digitizing Sponsor: Sloan Foundation

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Consider you travel by the luxurious steamers of the CLYDE LINE, The only line of Steamships between New York and Jacksonville, Fla., without change. Affording a delightful sail among the Sea Islands along the Southern Coast, calling at Charleston, S. C. Sailing from Tier 29, East River, New York, MONDA YS, WEDNESDA YS and FRIDA YS at 3 P. M. Tables are supplied with the best the Northern and Southern Markets afford. THE CLYDE SHIPS are of modern construction, and provided with every appliancefor safety, comfort and speed. M. H. Clyde, A. T. M. Theo. G. Eger, T. M. A. J. Cole, Passr Agent. W. P. CLYDE & CO., GeneraJ Agents, 5 Bowling Green, New York. 12 S. Delaware Ave., Philadelphia, Pa. /vANS!QN HeaSE, WASHINGTON STREET, : MORRISTOWN, N. J.

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Situated in central part of City. The only first-class hotel in Northern New Jersey. Newly furnished throughout all the modern improvements. L. D. GUERIN, Proprietor.

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Image from page 233 of “Rambles in the path of the steam-horse. An off-hand olla podrida, embracing a general historical and descriptive view of the scenery, agricultural and mineral resources, and prominent features of the travelled route from Baltimore

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Image from page 233 of “Rambles in the path of the steam-horse. An off-hand olla podrida, embracing a general historical and descriptive view of the scenery, agricultural and mineral resources, and prominent features of the travelled route from Baltimore
philadelphia travel company
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Identifier: ramblesinpathofs00bowe
Title: Rambles in the path of the steam-horse. An off-hand olla podrida, embracing a general historical and descriptive view of the scenery, agricultural and mineral resources, and prominent features of the travelled route from Baltimore to Harper’s Ferry, Cumberland, Wheeling, Cincinnati, and Louisville
Year: 1855 (1850s)
Authors: Bowen, Eli, b. 1824
Subjects: Baltimore and Ohio Railroad Company
Publisher: Philadelphia, W. Bromwell and W. W. Smith Baltimore, S. B. Hickcox, agent
Contributing Library: West Virginia University Libraries
Digitizing Sponsor: Lyrasis Members and Sloan Foundation

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n she tell you how she does things ;—but she does them,and you know by the old rule, which tells us that the proof of thepudding is in the eating thereof, that she does them well. From herJohnny cake up to her saddle of mountain venison, the same excellencepervades her every efibrt, and the cook, therefore, in the varied privilegesof her superiority, is allowed unchecked to scald the pointer dogs, rapthe youthful skulls of peering dar-kies, and even pin the dish-cloth toyoung masters coat, when he venturesinto the threshold of her province. Our old friend here is a specimen,and a good one, of the Virginia boot-black, now almost unknown in tlmore travelled portions of the StatThere he sits, as in the engravin^,,morning after morning, with a rowof shining boots,—green tops, fairtops, and rod tops—ranged before himlike soldiers upon dress parade; whilenear him a pile of the same useful articles of pedal wear, still dis-colored with yesterdaj^^s mud, await the exercise of his skill.

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Tl e I!oot-Uaok. RAMBLES IN THE PATH OF THE STEAM HORSE. 217Slaves and Slavery.—The Boot-black. Like all old negroes, who have belonged to decayed families, there is atouch of melancholy in his demeanor, and right solemnly does he dwellupon the past. But what we wish especially to mention—as marking,indeed, the whole class to which he belongs—is the wonderful facilitywith which he forms a true estimate of those with whom he may be broughtin contact. He is seldom in error, and you will try in vain to ring coun-terfeit coin upon him. The true old-fashioned gentleman—the passingaway of whoso race, none lament more than he—though thread-bare andbroken in fortune, is at once recognised by old Billy, and treated withthe most humble deference and respect; while your fresh upstart, stand-ing in his flashy dress, and swelling with the pride of new-gotten wealth,meets but cold civility at his hands, and always occasions some mutteredcontrast with the gentlemen of former days, not espe

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Acela Express #2004
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Acela Express (often called simply Acela) is the name used by Amtrak for the high-speed tilting train service operating between Washington, D.C. and Boston via Baltimore, Philadelphia, and New York along the Northeast Corridor (NEC) in the Northeast United States. The tilting design allows the train to travel at higher speeds on the sharply curved NEC without disturbing passengers, by lowering lateral G-forces.

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Acela_Express

Image from page 409 of “Roosevelt’s African trip; the story of his life, the voyage from New York to Mombasa, and the route through the heart of Africa, including the big game and other ferocious animals, strange peoples and countries found in the course

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Image from page 409 of “Roosevelt’s African trip; the story of his life, the voyage from New York to Mombasa, and the route through the heart of Africa, including the big game and other ferocious animals, strange peoples and countries found in the course
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Identifier: rooseveltsafrica00ungerfr
Title: Roosevelt’s African trip; the story of his life, the voyage from New York to Mombasa, and the route through the heart of Africa, including the big game and other ferocious animals, strange peoples and countries found in the course of his travels
Year: 1909 (1900s)
Authors: Unger, Frederic William, b. 1875
Subjects: Roosevelt, Theodore, 1858-1919 Game and game-birds
Publisher: [Philadelphia?, PA.]
Contributing Library: Smithsonian Libraries
Digitizing Sponsor: Smithsonian Libraries

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ued by both, but that of the former will be evident from thedescription of the latter. A man without means forms an expedition, and borrows moneyfor this purpose at one hundred per cent, after this fashion. He agreesto repay the lender in ivory at one-half its market value. Having ob-tained the required sum, he hires several vessels and engages from onehundred to three hundred men, composed of Arabs and runaway vil-lains from distant countries, who have found an asylum from justicein the obscurity of Khartoum. He purchases guns and large quantitiesof ammunition for his men, together with a few hundred pounds of 373 374 SAMUEL BAKER AND THE SLAVE TRADE glass beads. The piratical expedition being complete, he pays his menfive months wages in advance, at the rate of forty-five piastres (nineshillings) per month, and he agrees to give them eighty piastres permonth for any period exceeding the five months advanced. His menreceive their advance partly in cash and partly in cotton stuffs for

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BAKERS ARRIVAL AT RIONGAS ISLAND clothes at an exorbitant price. Every man has a strip of paper, uponwhich is written, by the clerk of the expedition, the amount he ha§received both in goods and money, and this paper he must produce atthe final settlement. The vessels sail about December, and on arrival at the desiredlocality, the party disembark and proceed into the interior, until theyarrive at the village of some negro chief, with whom they establish an SIR SAMUEL BASER AND THE SLAVE TRADE 375 intimacy. Charmed with his new friends, the power of whose weap-ons he acknowledges, the negro chief does not neglect the opportunityof seeking their alliance to attack a hostile neighbor. Marchingthroughout the night, guided by their negro hosts, they bivouac withinan hours march of the unsuspecting village doomed to an attack abouthalf an hour before break of day. The time arrives, and, quietly sur-rounding the village while its occupants are still sleeping, they firethe grass huts in all

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Image from page 116 of “A trip to the Orient; the story of a Mediterranean cruise” (1907)
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Identifier: triptoorientstor00jacorich
Title: A trip to the Orient; the story of a Mediterranean cruise
Year: 1907 (1900s)
Authors: Jacob, Robert Urie
Subjects: Middle East — Description and travel
Publisher: Philadelphia, The J. C. Winston co
Contributing Library: University of California Libraries
Digitizing Sponsor: MSN

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iffs on three sides. Theonly approach to its summit, which is about two hundredfeet above the level of the modern city, is on the south-west side, being reached by the avenues we had followedup the gradual slope past Mars Hill. On this height, said the guide, the Athenians,during the reign of Pericles in the golden age of Greece,erected a temple to their patron deity, Minerva, thegoddess of wisdom. And to this goddess, named alsoAthena, who, as they asserted, sprang from the brainof Jupiter a mature woman in complete armor, theylooked for protection. For her they offered theirchoicest gifts, yet they did not neglect the multitude ofother gods whom they feared to offend. The old guide was well informed, but his Englishwas rather difficult to understand. He was inter-rupted a number of times until one of the tourists, acollege professor, undertook the task of assisting himin the story. ■These dilapidated stone steps, said the professor,formed once the magnificent marble staircase that

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GIGANTIC STATUES OF WOMEN UPHOLD THE CORNICE. (105) io6 A TRIP TO THE ORIENT. led to the gateway of the Acropolis. The staircase wasseventy feet in width; in the centre was a slopingcarriageway up which chariots could be driven. It wasbuilt by Pericles four hundred years before the Christianera. Statues of wonderful beauty, by famous sculp-tors, were arranged along the steps. At times of greatrejoicing, as after a victory, triumphal processionsascended these flights to present offerings to the gods,or to deposit in the treasury of the temple the spoilstaken from their enemies and to offer sacrifices andworship to their protecting goddess. The Propylaea,or grand entrance hall and gateway to the Acropolis,stood at the head of the stairway; these broken columnsare all that remain of one of the most imposing structuresof that golden age. Keep close to the professor and never mind theguide, urged one of our companions. We followedher suggestion. This small building on our right with four g

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Route 15

A few nice philadelphia transportation images I found:

Route 15
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Image by rogerdupuis2
Eastbound car turning from Lancaster back onto Girard. Feb. 19, 2008.

SEPTA PCC 2743 at Altoff Siding
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Image by rogerdupuis2
SEPTA PCC 2743 is seen at the Rockhill Trolley Museum’s Altoff Siding during a photo op as part of the PCC Car Day event, July 21, 2012.

Last run from Blacklog
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Image by rogerdupuis2
It’s time to depart Blacklog Narrows for the last inbound runs of the day at the Rockhill Trolley Museum on July 21, 2012, PCC Car Day at the museum. York Railways 163, in the pocket track at right, is readied for its return whilst passengers wishing to ride back on Newark PCC 6 amble toward the 1946 streamliner, which already has its poles set for the inbound trip.

Outstanding Scenic Drives on US Route 89 Enhance the Road Trip Experience


Oracle, AZ (Vocus) November 18, 2009

Although most of US Route 89 between Mexico and Canada could be considered as a scenic drive, several sections stand out above the rest. Here is a list of the top five scenic drives selected by the US Route 89 Appreciation Society.

Driving US Route 89, a traveler encounters the greatest variety of scenery available along any one road in the United States, explains James Cowlin, a landscape photographer and founder of the US Route 89 Appreciation Society. From the deserts of Arizona, across the Colorado Plateau in Utah and into the Rocky Mountains of Wyoming and Montana, five of the most outstanding scenic drives are featured in the Road Trip Guides on the US Route 89 website. The Appreciation Society also encourages visitors to the website to add a description and photographs of their favorite scenic drive along highway 89.

Pinal Pioneer Parkway, Arizona

From Oracle Junction north of Tucson to Florence, this 42-mile section of historic US 89 (now AZ 79) is known as the Pinal Pioneer Parkway. Crossing the high Sonoran desert, the road is lined with ancient many-armed saguaro cactus and forests of chain fruit cholla. Black Mountain dominates the view to the east and in the distance are the the Tortilla Mountains. To the south, the peaks of the Santa Catalina Mountains rise to over 9000 feet. While the drive is enjoyable in all seasons, summer temperatures can be quite hot. Be sure to bring plenty of drinking water along. Spring and fall are the best times for this drive when wildflowers and cactuses are in bloom. At the mid-point of the drive is a memorial to the cowboy actor, Tom Mix, who died in a car crash nearby in 1940. Historically, the Pinal Pioneer Parkway was part of the main road linking Phoenix and Tucson, so driving the road today gives the motorist a small taste of what that journey was like before the era of Interstate highways.

Oak Creek Canyon, Arizona

Oak Creek flows south from the edge of the Colorado Plateau through Sedona to the Verde River. The 16-mile stretch of historic US 89A (now AZ 89A) from Sedona to the Oak Creek Vista Overlook takes the traveler through a wonderland of creek-side cottonwood and sycamore trees. Oak Creek has cut down through ancient layers of sandstone and limestone forming red and white cliffs that tower above the road. There are a number of parking areas and campgrounds that give access to the creek for hiking and picnicing. The switchbacks at the head of Oak Creek Canyon mark the transition from the lowland desert and the central mountains of Arizona on to the Colorado Plateau.

Logan Canyon National Scenic Byway, Utah

Logan Canyon is 40-mile stretch of US Route 89 between Logan in the Cache Valley and Garden City on the shore of Bear Lake. From the Wasatch-Cache National Forest boundary east of Logan, the road climbs steadily alongside the Logan River until it reaches the summit at the Bear Lake overlook. The forest-lined drive offers many places to stop for a picnic or to camp for an extended stay. The canyon is also renowned for its display of brightly colored fall foliage. The road is open year-round and recreational opportunities range from hiking and horseback riding to cross-country skiing and snowmobiling. From the summit, US 89 drops quickly to the shore of Bear Lake. A free brochure detailing this scenic drive is available from the Logan Canyon National Scenic Byway website.

Grand Teton National Park, Wyoming

For 45 miles US Route 89 lies inside Grand Teton National Park. Ten overlooks and picnic areas line the highway, providing spectacular views of the jagged eastern face of the Teton Range. Each is a photographers delight, with the Snake River in the foreground in the southern stretch, and Jackson Lake reflecting the mountains in the north. Although the road is open year-round, the most colorful time to drive it is in the fall when the leaves are turning and the air is crisp and clear.

Kings Hill Scenic Byway, Montana

Passing through the Lewis and Clark National Forest, this 71-mile long section of US 89 winds its way along mountain streams through the Little Belt Mountains. Along the road are many outdoor recreation opportunities from fly fishing in the summer to snowmobiling in the winter. One of the highlights is a short hike to Memorial Falls located about a mile and a half south of the town of Neihart. Sluice Boxes State Park is near the northern end of the scenic byway. This primitive state park contains the remains of mines, a railroad and historic cabins lining Belt Creek through a beautiful canyon carved in limestone.

Special Offer for Highway 89 Travelers

Visitors to the US Route 89 website can share their favorites on the Scenic Drives page of the Road Trip Guides. Using the unique Share Your 89 Stories feature, contributors can add a description and photographs to the page. Each person who contributes to this page will receive a free copy of the Adobe Acrobat (pdf} version of the official US Route 89 Road Trip Map Book.

The US Route 89 Appreciation Society is a resource for planning a western road trip vacation and a place for sharing stories and photographs of this unique highway. It is part of the slow road movement that encourages travel on the two-lane roads that lead to the heart and soul of America. For more information, visit the US Route 89 website. Media Contact: James Cowlin, 602-944-3286, jim at us89society dot org.

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