Category Archives: Society Hill Travel

The Role of Physics in Society

If we could get into one of those wonderful Wellsian time machines, all shining oak and glass, with polished brass handles and instruments, and ride it back to some time in the latter half of the nineteenth century, we would encounter a very different world from the one of today. Especially for Americans, it is difficult to conceive of a world where the United States counted for relatively little on the world stage. The same applied even more to all the other countries of the Americas. Except for Canada and Cuba, the whole continent had won political independence from Europe during that century, but it was still perceived as an extension of European cultures, with limited input in world affairs.

The whole world was run, in effect, from a handful of Western European countries, led by Britain which, even without the United States, had an empire that covered about one quarter of the globe. Furthermore, it was by far the leading manufacturer of machinery, armaments and textiles in the world, with the Bank of England holding most of the gold used in world trade. France also had a very large empire and so did some very small European countries, like Holland, Belgium and Portugal. Germany and Italy were occupied for many years during this period with unifying their countries under one central authority and therefore missed out on most of the empire building activity, but Germany especially was rapidly catching up with Britain as a leading manufacturing nation by the end of that century.

Looking at the size of all these European countires on the map, one can only wonder how it came about that they were running most of the world at that time. What made their influence so overwhelming when, only a few centuries before, they had seemed on the verge of extinction from the black death? The answer to this question leads into the subject of this article.

What made the small Western European nations invincible at that time were the practical applications of natural laws, contained in Newton’s monumental synthesis, the Principia Mathematica, published in 1687. Only four years before that date, Western Europe had been very nearly overrun by the Ottoman Turks and was only saved by the opportune arrival of the king of Poland, Jan Sobieski, who rode his cavalry to the aid of the beleagured Duke of Lorraine and his Christian coalition, fighting a desperate battle bfore the gates of Vienna. And a scant two hundred years later, the flood of inventions derived from applying the basic laws of physics enabled these same endangered little countries to rule the world.

Was that all there was to the story? If we had made our time machine land somewhere in England during this period, the latter half of the nineteenth century, we would have encountered some appalling and, to us today, totally unacceptable social conditions. But there would have been something else. English society at that time exuded an underlying confidence and certainty that we can only envy today. They were looking to science to solve all their problems by simply continuing along the same path they had been following for over a hundred years. And by science they meant the scientific way of looking at things, which meant not only building better steam engines, roads, railroads and ships, but also better social systems and laws, founded not on hereditary privilege but on usefulness to the community. They knew they still had plenty of work left but they felt they were on the right path and the coming twentieth century would bring very great benefits and solutions to problems.

Where did this “scientific way of looking at things” come from and why did it suddenly provide such an impetus to a few Western European nations? The answer lies not with Newton but beyond him, to Galileo. Galileo founded modern physics by providing the axiomatic postulates that defined this “scientific way” for the future. He first of all secularized science by removing God from the picture and installing nature and her laws in His place. Nature was all that was needed to explain the physical world in mathematical (scientific) terms. Then he concentrated the focus of his new physics on just matter and motion. What causes a change in motion is a physical force and these are the realities dealt with by Newton.

Galileo was a revolutionary innovator when it came to viewing the world. He looked at it analytically, without feeling any personal connection with the objects he was analyzing. This change from the medieval, participatory, experience of the world enabled Galileo and later thinkers like Newton to express natural phenomena and natural laws in mathematical, logical terms. The previously impenetrable laws of nature were explained in simple, rational ways that ordinary people could understand. They could see that, if you confined God and the upper world to a realm of belief only, the only reality you had to deal with in nature consisted of the physical objects that, in Lord Kelvin’s phrase, were “quantifiable” and “measurable”.

By the end of the nineteenth century, the whole of nature was becoming a well-lighted room, with every new advance in science adding to the brightness of the illumination. It was fully expected that physics would finish its theoretical work very soon. As the same Lord Kelin said in the 1880s: “There is nothing new to be discovered in physics now; all that remains is more and more precise measurement”.

Here, then, is the origin of that confidence and certainty which was such a feature of Victorian society, which could be seen in any portrait of the plump and prosperous persons of the new moneyed classes of the time. There was complete harmony between the way people experienced the world as the only solid reality and the way science explained this world in laws that were predictable and logical, with causes leading to their calculable effects as certainly as billiard balls colliding on a table.

Then came the twentieth century and physics breached the atomic barrier. The solid reality of physical objects (which Newton dealt with) disintegrated in the subatomic world of particles. It became obvious that these particles were not just very small bits of the same matter that people were familiar with. As time went on and quantum mechanics kept gaining ground, the very reality of the existence of such particles as separate entities became doubful. One of the greatest physicists of the twentieth century, Werner Heisenberg, put it this way:

“In the experiments about atomic events we have to do with things and facts, the phenomena that are just as real as any phenomena in daily life. But the atoms or elementary particles themselves are not real; they form a world of potentialities or possibilities rather than of things or facts”.

But any object in nature that Newton dealt with is simply composed of a very large number of these “atoms or elementary particles”. If these are not real and the objects themselves are real, where does reality begin? Is reality merely a function of the number of atoms you can put together? We can begin to see why we no longer enjoy that feeling of certainty and confidence in having the right answers which our Victorian ancestors laid claim to.

We still, or at least most of us do, feel the world as Galileo did. We still feel that the physical objects of nature are the only solid reality, and this includes gases, which may not be visible but which we know consist of just those same “atoms and elementary particles” whose reality can, apparently, no longer be taken for granted. Our science today no longer reflects the way we feel about the world. The old harmony is gone. However, most of us still have faith in science’s ability to explain the world to us. In Newton’s time, science was readily understood by educated people. His laws could be taught to schoolchildren. Even if he could not really explain what gravity actually was, Newton proved mathematically that its operation could be explained successfully by saying that it worked in direct proportion to the masses of the bodies involved and in inverse proportion to the square of the distance between them. Today, the mathematics of physics has become so difficult that only a small group of specialists can understand it. Ordinary people, even if they are reasonably well acquainted with science, can no longer contribute to the debate in terms of the mathematical work involved.

However, physics has now reached the point where in both theory and practice in, for instance quantum mechanics, the consequences and implications of the work done are philosophical as well as mathematical. This may have the effect of bringing this very remote and difficult science once more into an area of more public debate. The mathematics would, of course, remain off-limits to ordinary mortals, but the conceptual structure that Galileo bequeathed to later thinkers, especially with regard to reality, might need revision and others besides theoretical physicists might usefully be brought into the picture. Galileo, like most educated people of his time, was well versed in the Platonic concepts of reality. To Plato, the knowledge to be gained from the physical world was fleeting and unreliable, being merely the subjective result of our sense perceptions. Real, true knowledge, which did not depend on human senses and was therefore objective, was to him a property only of the upper, divine world. However, when Galileo came to stating his axiomatic postulates regarding future scientific methods, he felt that matter and motion – and only matter and motion – were suitable for science because they did not depend on any human presence or any human senses. He felt that these two “qualities” were independently (and therefore objectively) real. His thinking in this regard affected the course of the entire future of physics, though in time, not just matter and motion but all physical phenomena came to be regarded as independently (and therefore objectively) real, as we have seen.

However, physics, in its own, normal development in the last hundred years, has come to realize that all physical phenomena, perceived through the senses, must be subjective in nature. Even matter and motion involve the sense of sight and Galileo erred in thinking that these two qualities of the physical world could somehow be considered objective, or independent of man’s senses. But if everything we perceive in nature has, by definition, to be subjective, then no physical phenomena can have an independent identity or history of their own, which would cause very serious rethinking about the early periods of this earth, before the appearance of man. For these reasons, it seems reasonable to suppose that our concepts of reality in modern physics are the ones that most need new thinking, so that a revised framework of concepts might be worked out, within which the physics of the future can operate.

Werner Thurau was born in December 1927, in Havana, Cuba. In 1929, his family returned to his father’s native Germany. He spent the entire 1930s in Berlin, but came to England in 1939 and was then further educated in that country, ending with an engineering degree from London University. His further career took him all over the world on technical projects, moving first to Mexico and then to the United States, where he lives now. At school in England, he was exposed early in life to the world of ideas. Some of his teachers were friends of C.S. Lewis and Lewis’s Oxford group, the Inklings, and his father was a philosophical bookworm. Werner combined this background with a lifelong interest in physics, especially modern physics after it breached the atomic barrier. This interest extended to Galileo, the founder of our age, and what made him so different from others of his time, as well as to the effect physics has had on other related sciences, such as evolutionary theory (and its polar opposite, creationism). He came to see that the latest developments in physics bring in subjects not normally associated with a book on that science, such as consciousness, reality concepts and even ethics. It is the reality concepts of Galileo that have most haunted physics ever since and need revision.
For further thoughts on such a revision, visit: http://www.galileoshadow.com

Risky Cosmetic Surgery Vacations on the Rise

(PRWEB) August 11, 2004

Interest in cosmetic surgery in the U.S. is just about over the moon.

Not only do we spend our spare time watching television reality and drama shows about facial and body rejuvenations, but millions of us pony up and present our not-so-perfect countenances to cosmetic surgeons in record numbers. We may even be in the middle of a cosmetic surgery bubble.

But vacation facelifts? Overseas cosmetic surgery has become a trend, and like every other fad, there are pros and cons. Sure, offshore procedures are cheaper. But danger and complications may lurk.

Ads for cosmetic surgery in exotic places around the globe are popping up just about everywhere. Some suggest you to have your surgery in the U.S. and then recover in the dream vacation of a lifetime.

However, many other ads ask you to travel to distant locales to undergo a facial rejuvenation. For instance, Xinhua, China, is currently popular with its 100 cosmetic surgery centers while Malaysia targets breast surgery tourists. Airlines are also getting in on the trend. For instance, Valuair, Singapore’s first budget airline, is launching a series of regional tours that combine short holidays with stops for cosmetic surgery. The airline’s Meditour to Bangkok runs $ 2200 from California. Internet surfers are bringing up Beautiful Vacations, a website written in English, French, Dutch, German and Arabic. The site arranges cosmetic, plastic and reconstructive tours to Indonesia. Costa Rica advertises itself as “the Beverly Hills of the South” because it has so many cosmetic surgeons.

Of course, a cosmetic surgery vacation is not without risk. For instance, so many women in the Eastern U.S. have been traveling to the Dominican Republic for fat removal procedures; the process has picked up its own moniker: Lipotourism.

“Something that cheap can be very costly — it can cost your life,” says New York City Councilman Miguel Martinez who is concerned because many New York City residents have been returning home after surgery and then complaining of boils, swelling and red splotches on their skin. Botches surgery returnees have also been reported in Massachusetts, North Carolina, Rhode Island and Puerto Rico.

In England, the British Association of Aesthetic Plastic Surgeons is seeing increasing numbers of patients seeking facelifts traveling to East Europe or Africa for low-cost surgery. One English plastic surgeon said he saw two patients who went to Eastern Europe for abdominoplasty (“tummy tuck”) whose wounds reopened following the surgery.

Before you sign on to any vacation destination, advises the American Society of Aesthetic Plastic Surgery, (ASAPS) you should think about your medical condition. Do you really want to sign up for water skiing, gymnastics or the fifty foot diving platform with fresh stitches?

“Suffice it to say, you won’t be ready for horseback riding or a round of golf,” advises the ASAPS. “Most cosmetic surgeries involve restrictions on normal activities, and particularly, on exercise.”

You can pretty well forget about catching some rays, too. It’s because many types of cosmetic surgery require you to stay out of the sun until you are fully healed. Moreover, some antibiotics react badly with sunlight.

Adds one London surgeon: “It’s not a good idea to have surgery and then go on a long-haul flight. The risk of deep vein thrombosis increases with a long flight.”

Further advises the ASAPS: “There are, of course, excellent surgeons in many countries, but it’s hard to evaluate training and credentials of surgeons outside the U.S. Unfortunately, there is no single international standard for quality in medicine.”

That also means an offshore facility may not offer the same safeguards for equipment, personnel and emergency procedures.

If your procedure runs into trouble when you get back home, a U.S.-based physician may not know what to do or how he can help because he usually will not know what specific techniques were used in the first operation.

http://www.cosmeticsurgery.com

EDITOR’S NOTE: If you need an expert source in your circulation area, call CosmeticSurgery.com’s media contact at 909-933-6750 ext 165 and we will survey our hundreds of physician associates in the U.S. for a spokesperson. We may also be able to locate actual tourists in your circulation area who have traveled on a cosmetic surgery vacation.

SOURCES:

The American Society of Plastic Surgeons -847-228-9900

The American Society of Aesthetic Plastic Surgery: 212-921-0500

Centers for Disease Control: 404-639-3286. Dominican Republic Infection report at New York City Department of Health: 212-788-5290







More Society Hill Flights Press Releases

Stars of Critics Choice Awards Show Grace & Compassion – Celebrities Donate Gift Bags to Raise Funds for Tsunami Relief

Beverly Hills, CA; Cedar Knolls, NJ (PRWEB) January 12, 2005

The usual glitz and glamour of the 10th Annual Critics Choice Awards was outshined this year when Tinsel-Town’s brightest showed hearts of gold. As celebrities at the Wiltern Theatre in Los Angeles, CA recognized their peers and celebrated their cinematic achievement, the producers of the Critics Choice Awards show asked award winners and presenters to do the uncommon – to autograph, and then donate, their Celebrity Gift Bags – each valued well over $ 20,000 – to Operation USA for Tsunami relief in southeast Asia.    

The autographed Critics Choice Awards Gift Bags, sponsored by TRIMSPA and WINFUEL, will be auctioned on eBay with all proceeds going to Operation USA. Founded by Julie Andrews and Blake Edwards, Operation USA has garnered a reputation for innovation, care, and speed in sending relief flights, and sea and land shipments to countries that have experienced devastating events.

Alex Goen, founder and CEO of TRIMSPA, said, “These Gift Bags are highly valued. To give them up is one thing, but to autograph the bag in an effort to increase its value and the potential price fetched at auction, is remarkable. I am so pleased that we were a part of this event and could play a small role in the effort.” Goen was so moved by the celebrity generosity that, in appreciation, he had his company immediately issue each donator a personalized VIP Pit Pass to any NASCAR® Busch® Series race.

Among those who have contributed to the Tsunami relief fund are the Broadcast Critics’ Association and WINFUEL ®. Behind the scenes, honorees and guests visited the Winner’s Circle in the Gift Bag Showroom and autographed the hood of the #32 WINFUEL® / TRIMSPA Chevrolet. Signatures collected included: Eric McCormack, Tom Cruise, Maria Bello, Gerald Butler, David Duchovny, Tara Reid, George Lopez, Andy Garcia, Lauren Graham, Marcia Gay Harden, Regina King, Christina Lahti, William H. Macy, Virginia Madsen, Jamie Foxx, Chad Michael Murray, Tim Robbins, David Spade, Jon Voight, Treat Williams, and Emmy Rossum.    

The Broadcast Film Critics’ Association (BFCA) paid tribute to some of Hollywood’s finest talent, with awards presented to: “Sideways” for Best Picture, Jamie Fox for Best Actor, Hilary Swank for Best Actress, Thomas Haden Church for Best Supporting Actor, Virginia Madsen for Best Supporting Actress, and Tom Cruise recipient of the Distinguished Career Achievement in Performing Arts Award. For more information on the winners, go to http://www.thewb.com.

For exclusive backstage photos go to http://www.trimspapr.com/.

About WINFUEL Inc.

WINFUEL Inc., a Cedar Knolls, New Jersey company, is the maker of WINFUEL, an about-to-be released consumer product dedicated to those whose lives are committed to one thing – WINNING. WINFUEL® is a key sponsor in the NASCAR® racing circuit through Braun Racing.

About TRIMSPA Inc.

TRIMSPA® Inc., a Cedar Knolls, New Jersey company is the maker of TRIMSPA® X32, the leader in weight-loss supplements. TRIMSPA Inc. is a key sponsor in the NASCAR® racing circuit through Braun Racing, supporting various events and works with numerous charitable organizations including the Millennium Women’s Foundation, Susan G. Komen Breast Cancer Foundation®, American Cancer Society®, and Make-A-Wish Foundation®. TRIMSPA® Inc. has helped celebrities like Anna Nicole Smith and heavyweight boxer Shannon Briggs lose weight. For more information about TRIMSPA Inc. and its products visit http://www.trimspa.com or call 1-800-TRIMSPA.

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Obesity in Today’s Society

Obesity is rapidly becoming one of the greatest health challenges of the 21st century. No disease is more common and causes more unnecessary illness or early death than obesity.  Furthermore there is no other single problem that so reduces the quality of life or increases the demand for healthcare services

The problem is worldwide.  In the United States, more than two of every three adults are overweight and about one in three is obese  This means that approximately 60 million people have the disease of obesity in the United States alone.  More than one in five Australian adults, an estimated 2.6 million of a population of 20 million, are obese.  For both countries, the incidence of obesity has doubled since 1980.  Alarmingly, obesity starts in childhood and already 7% of our teenagers are obese.

Around the world, all countries have a growing problem.  There are now an estimated 300 million people around the world who are suffering from obesity and its consequences.  In both developed and developing nations, a similar pattern is occurring.  In Russia, 54% of adults are overweight.  In Brazil, the figure is 36%, and in Malaysia, 27%.  Even China has a developing problem.  A recent survey of adults in urban Shanghai reported that 29.5% were overweight and 4.3% were obese.

After millions of years of evolution we carry a genetic structure designed to enable us to survive the life of the hunter-gatherer, but our health and our lives are now threatened by a lifestyle characterized by ready access to copious amounts of attractive food and very little need for physical activity.  Foods high in fat, carbohydrates and, in particular, simple sugars, are booming.  The US Department of Agriculture reports that the US per capita intake of sugar was 152.4 lb (69 kg) in 2000.  This is equal to nearly half a pound (230 g) of sugar per person each day.  Most people will claim that they are not eating that much sugar.  However, sugar is now a part of so many foods that we don’t even realize that we are eating it.  Sugar has infiltrated out diet to a frightening extent.  One hundred years ago, the sugar intake per capita was only 0.5lb (230 g).  Is it any wonder that we have a problem with obesity?

And we don’t even need to get out of the chair to order the food to be delivered or to change the channels on the television.  Activity has become optional.  The combination of increased intake of energy and reduced energy expenditure inevitably leads to progressive weight increase.

Debra Donahue is a 20 year nurse and freelance medical writer who hails from Dallas, Texas. She has written for some of the top hospitals in the world. Learn more about a true surgery center by visiting Dallas Lap-Band Surgery or learning about weight loss surgery options in Dallas.

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Blytheco Celebrates 25 Year Anniversary

Laguna Hills, CA (PRWEB) February 20, 2005

“With the opportunities provided through Internet marketing, and our national customer base, we have projected an aggressive growth plan for hiring additional consultants and regional sales teams during 2005”, remarked President Stephen P. Blythe. “Cooperatively working with Best Software and their philosophy of ‘Customers For Life’, we have strategically targeted our marketplace to better serve our local, regional and national customer base. The expertise and experience of our staff during these past 25 years has equipped and positioned us to provide business solutions for companies to succeed in their marketplace. We appreciate the loyalty of our customers, the support of our vendors and the dedication of our staff to afford Blytheco the opportunity for continued growth”. Throughout its 25 year business history, Blytheco has performed thousands of Best Software product implementations. Blytheco implements and supports MAS 90, MAS 200, MAS 500, Businessworks, MIP, Abra HRMS and Saleslogix CRM software solutions for a wide variety of clientele.

“As we start our 25th year we are honored to be recognized by our peers in the industry and business leaders such as Best Software, Orange County Business Journal, Ernst & Young and Fullerton College for our dedication to our clients, leadership and pursuit of excellence.”

About Blytheco, Inc. (http://www.blytheco.com)

Headquartered in Laguna Hills, Blytheco specializes in streamlining business operations through Best Software computer applications, support, and consulting services. Celebrating 25 years in Orange County, Blytheco has been a leader in creating critical business solutions, enabling businesses to process information more efficiently and effectively. Accounting, Finance, CRM and Human Resource information systems are the heart of a company’s operational success. Providing a proven strategic edge for increasing a company’s ROI, Blytheco incorporates and simplifies existing technologies to automate business processes, decrease costs, increase sales and operations, thereby, providing complete solutions for business needs. In addition to providing an extensive portfolio of products and support services, Blytheco also provides customized enhancements, organizational specific consulting services, and comprehensive on-site and classroom training programs. Blytheco is a Best Software Master Developer, Authorized Training Center, Best Software Certified Support Center and is honored to be Best Software Partner of the Year. Nationwide expansion includes Arizona, Florida, New Jersey, New York, Ohio, Texas and Washington D.C.

Blytheco is proud to give back to the community via its participation in the American Cancer Society’s Relay for Life, Orangewood Children’s Home, Angel Flight, and LIGA International which is a philanthropic volunteer organization that provides medical and dental care to impoverished people in rural Mexico.

Blytheco is honored to have received the following awards from Best Software for 2004:

2004 Best Software Business Partner of the Year (received for 7 years)

2004 Member of the Best Software Million Dollar Circle (received for 7 years)

2004 Best Software President’s Circle (received for 8 years)

2004 Partner of the Year for MAS 90 and MAS 200 (received for 7 years)

Best Software Authorized Training Center Top Performer (received for 7 years)

Best Software Partner of the Year for MAS 500 (multiple years)

Best Software Partner of the Year BusinessWorks (multiple years)

Additional recent awards received:

2004 Ernst & Young Entrepreneur of the Year Award Recipient, “Realizing Potential”

2004 Orange County Business Journal Family Owned Small Business Award Recipient

2004 Accounting Today/Accounting Technology Top 100 Pacesetter

About Best Software, Inc.

Best Software offers leading business management products and services that give more than 2.3 million small and mid-sized customers in North America the insight for success throughout the lives of their businesses. Its parent company, The Sage Group plc (London: SGE.L), supports 4.3 million customers worldwide. For more than 25 years, Best Software has delivered easy-to-use, scalable and customizable applications through its portfolio of leading brands, including Abra, ACCPAC, ACT!, BusinessVision, CPASoftware, FAS, MAS 90, MAS 200, MAS 500, MIP, Peachtree, SalesLogix, Timberline, among many others. For more information, please visit the Web site at http://www.bestsoftware.com/moreinfo or call (866) 308-BEST.

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Blytheco Named #1 Training Center For Best Software

(PRWEB) April 21, 2005

“Once again, I am extremely proud of our trainers’ and their ability to guide and teach our customers on the use and possibilities of a chosen software package”, remarked Stephen P.Blythe, President of Blytheco. “Many times it is a first time experience our customers have in actually working hands-on with the software. This can sometimes be a difficult challenge during the implementation process. Our experienced trainers help ease the customer through this process by educating them how to operate and obtain the solutions they are seeking for their businesses”.

About Blytheco, Inc. (http://www.blytheco.com)

Headquartered in Laguna Hills, Blytheco specializes in streamlining business operations through Best Software computer applications, support, and consulting services. Celebrating 25 years in Orange County, Blytheco has been a leader in creating critical business solutions, enabling businesses to process information more efficiently and effectively. Accounting, Finance, CRM and Human Resource information systems are the heart of a company’s operational success. Providing a proven strategic edge for increasing a company’s ROI, Blytheco incorporates and simplifies existing technologies to automate business processes, decrease costs, increase sales and operations, thereby, providing complete solutions for business needs. In addition to providing an extensive portfolio of products and support services, Blytheco also provides customized enhancements, organizational specific consulting services, and comprehensive on-site and classroom training programs. Blytheco is a Best Software Master Developer, Authorized Training Center, Best Software Certified Support Center and is honored to be Best Software Partner of the Year. Nationwide expansion includes Arizona, Florida, Missouri, New Jersey, New York, Ohio, Texas and Washington D.C.

Blytheco is proud to give back to the community via its participation in the American Cancer Society’s Relay for Life, Orangewood Children’s Home, Angel Flight, and LIGA International which is a philanthropic volunteer organization that provides medical and dental care to impoverished people in rural Mexico.

Blytheco is honored to have received the following awards from Best Software for 2004:

2004 Best Software Business Partner of the Year (received for 7 years)

2004 Member of the Best Software Million Dollar Circle (received for 7 years)

2004 Best Software President’s Circle (received for 8 years)

2004 Partner of the Year for MAS 90 and MAS 200 (received for 7 years)

Best Software Authorized Training Center Top Performer (received for 7 years)

Best Software Partner of the Year for MAS 500 (multiple years)

Best Software Partner of the Year BusinessWorks (multiple years)

Additional recent awards received:

2004 Ernst & Young Entrepreneur of the Year Award Recipient, “Realizing Potential”

2004 Orange County Business Journal Family Owned Small Business Award Recipient

2004 Accounting Today/Accounting Technology Top 100 Pacesetter

About Best Software, Inc.

Best Software offers leading business management products and services that give more than 2.3 million small and mid-sized customers in North America the insight for success throughout the lives of their businesses. Its parent company, The Sage Group plc (London: SGE.L), supports 4.3 million customers worldwide. For more than 25 years, Best Software has delivered easy-to-use, scalable and customizable applications through its portfolio of leading brands, including Abra, ACCPAC, ACT!, BusinessVision, CPASoftware, FAS, MAS 90, MAS 200, MAS 500, MIP, Peachtree, SalesLogix, Timberline, among many others. For more information, please visit the Web site at http://www.bestsoftware.com/moreinfo or call (866) 308-BEST.

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Blytheco Partners with RedTail EDI Solution

(PRWEB) July 14, 2005

The RedTail Transaction Manager enables suppliers to process their purchase orders easily and routinely without any manual or duplicate key entry of information and then send them directly to their accounting system. RedTail’s EDI solution for MAS 90, MAS 200 and MAS 500 Sage Business applications is a quick, simple and efficient method of enabling middle-market companies to work in E-Commerce and EDI with current, as well as future, trading partners.

Blytheco will install the RedTail application and link to the accounting system quickly with the pre-configured software and have minimal disruption to normal business routine. “With Blytheco and RedTail EDI solutions, your EDI interface can be up and running in as little as one week”, President Stephen P. Blythe quotes. “Set-up, validation and maintenance of the trading relationship delivered as an out-sourced service to the mid-market supplier is just one of many Blytheco solutions of helping our customers achieve their business goals”.

About Blytheco, Inc. (http://www.blytheco.com)

Headquartered in Laguna Hills California, Blytheco specializes in streamlining business operations through Sage Software computer applications, support, and consulting services. Celebrating 25 years in Orange County, Blytheco has been a leader in creating critical business solutions, enabling businesses to process information more efficiently and effectively. Accounting, Finance, CRM and Human Resource information systems are the heart of a company’s operational success. Providing a proven strategic edge for increasing a company’s ROI, Blytheco incorporates and simplifies existing technologies to automate business processes, decrease costs, increase sales and operations, thereby, providing complete solutions for business needs. In addition to providing an extensive portfolio of products and support services, Blytheco also provides customized enhancements, organizational specific consulting services, and comprehensive on-site and classroom training programs. Blytheco is a Sage Software Master Developer, Authorized Training Center, Sage Software Certified Support Center and is honored to be Sage Software Partner of the Year. Nationwide expansion includes Arizona, Colorado, Florida, Illinois, Missouri, Nevada, New Mexico, New Jersey, New York, Ohio, Texas and Utah.

Blytheco is proud to give back to the community via its participation in the American Cancer Society’s Relay for Life, Orangewood Children’s Home, Angel Flight, and LIGA International which is a philanthropic volunteer organization that provides medical and dental care to impoverished people in rural Mexico.

Blytheco is honored to have received the following awards from Sage Software for 2004:

2004 Sage Software Business Partner of the Year (received for 7 years)

2004 Member of the Sage Software Million Dollar Circle (received for 7 years)

2004 Sage Software President’s Circle (received for 8 years)

2004 Partner of the Year for MAS 90 and MAS 200 (received for 7 years)

Sage Software Authorized Training Center Top Performer (received for 7 years)

Sage Software Partner of the Year for MAS 500 (multiple years)

Sage Software Partner of the Year BusinessWorks (multiple years)

Additional recent awards received:

2004 Ernst & Young Entrepreneur of the Year Award Recipient, “Realizing Potential”

2004 Orange County Business Journal Family Owned Small Business Award Recipient

2004 Accounting Today/Accounting Technology Top 100 Pacesetter

About Sage Software (formerly Best Software)

Sage Software offers leading business management products and services that support the needs, challenges and dreams of more than 2.4 million small and mid-sized customers in North America. Its parent company, The Sage Group plc (London: SGE.), supports 4.5 million customers worldwide. For more than 25 years, Sage Software has delivered easy-to-use, scalable and customizable applications through its portfolio of leading brands, including Abra, ACCPAC, ACT!, BusinessWorks, CPASoftware, FAS, MAS 90, MAS 200, MAS 500, MIP, Peachtree, SalesLogix, and Timberline Office, among many others. For more information, please visit the Web site at http://www.bestsoftware.com/moreinfo or call (866) 308-BEST.

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What’s New in Monterey County, Summer 2005

MONTEREY, Calif. (PRWEB) July 23, 2005

What’s New in Monterey County is a quarterly publication of the Monterey County Convention & Visitors Bureau. For more information, members of the media should contact the MCCVB Communications Department at 831-657-6405. All contents of What’s New in Monterey County, and additional information, can be found on the “Media” section of http://www.montereyinfo.org, or can be sent via fax, regular mail or email text.

NEW NON-STOP FLIGHTS NOW LANDING IN MONTEREY

With new daily non-stop flights connecting Monterey to Denver, Las Vegas and Salt Lake City, it’s now easier than ever to plan a coastal California getaway. The Monterey Peninsula Airport is located just three miles east of historic downtown Monterey and mere minutes away from the area’s major attractions, including the Monterey Bay Aquarium, National Steinbeck Center, 17-Mile Drive in Pebble Beach and Cannery Row. Denver and Las Vegas service began in June; Salt Lake City flights take off on August 1. For more information and complete schedules, visit http://www.montereyinfo.org. Media contact: Julie Armstrong, 831-657-6405.

TEE TIME ON A DIME: MORE GOLF FOR LESS GREEN

Tight exacting fairways, elevated greens, stoic Monterey Pines and the crashing Pacific… The nation’s top golf destination also sports a bevy of courses primed for the public, from the oldest course west of the Mississippi to the two-iron-if-you-can gems that dot Ford Ord. From June 15 through December 15, 2005, the Monterey County Convention & Visitors Bureau’s new Tee Time on a Dime promotion helps visitors streamline their swing at six participating courses with a 15 percent discount on regular green fees. Package is subject to availability, not valid for tournament or group use and cannot be combined with other discounts or promotions. Reserve tee times directly with course or visit http://www.montereyinfo.org for more information. Media contact: Koleen Hamblin, 800-487-9057, Julie Armstrong, 831-657-6405.

OFF-ROAD IN STYLE: NEW LAND ROVER SCHOOL AT QUAIL LODGE

Some 80 acres of hills, wooded trails, sand traps and rocks will challenge drivers when Quail Lodge (http://www.quaillodge.com) opens the only Land Rover Experience Driving School on the west coast beginning in August 2005. Guests, groups and the public can get behind the wheel of their choice of Land Rover and tackle off-road obstacles; one-on-one instruction by certified Land Rover driving instructors help drivers learn advanced techniques like winching and vehicle recovery. Lessons and team building activities range from one-hour outings to full-day adventures. Media contact: Susan Pasarow, 310-453-2539.

NEW OENOPHILE ADVENTURES IN MONTEREY’S WINE COUNTRY

With 40,000 acres of vineyards and the largest production of chardonnay grapes in the nation, Monterey County has long been a favorite of those planning grape escapes. Now, new wineries and tasting rooms along the area’s wine trails offer fresh opportunities to sip and sample. Chateau Sinnet opened a new wine and gourmet shop with tasting room in Seaside in early July; Cima Collina, the first winery in Marina, will debut its small vineyard wines in November 2005. San Saba, celebrating its 30th anniversary in 2005, will open a new tasting room at its vineyard just off the Salinas Valley’s scenic River Road in August. Other must-see stops along River Road include Paraiso Vineyards and Hahn Estates/Smith & Hook Winery, plus new neighbors Pessagno Winery, Marilyn Remark Wines and Richard Boyer Wines. For more information on Monterey County wines, visit http://www.montereywines.org. Media contact: Rhonda Motil, 831-375-9400.

YOUNG DETECTIVES MEET THEIR MATCH AT MONTEREY BAY AQUARIUM

“Aquarium Detectives” is the newest addition to the Monterey Bay Aquarium’s (http://www.montereybayaquarium.org) popular Aquarium Adventures offerings, available again this summer and fall. Designed for families with children ages 3-9, Aquarium Detectives lets young spies find clues, play games and learn how to keep aquarium animals healthy in their exhibit home. The program is available on select Saturdays through October 29. Started in 2003, Aquarium Adventures gives visitors hands-on access to some of the aquarium’s most popular exhibits and programming; a complete schedule is available at http://www.montereybayaquarium.org. Print media contact: Ken Peterson, 831-648-4922, Broadcast media: Mimi Hahn 831-648-4918.

CENTRAL COAST CD-ROM FEATURES STUNNING SCENERY AND TRAVEL INFORMATION

With crashing waves and soaring cliffs, idyllic vineyards, fascinating wildlife and historic buildings, California’s Central Coast is a place of spectacular scenic beauty. The Central California Coast Interactive CD-ROM (http://www.centralcalcoast.com) features more than 500 high-quality photos and a full-screen slideshow of images from Monterey County, Hearst Castle and Cambria. Both a souvenir and a travel reference, the CD includes some 100 pages of printable guides and maps, plus web links and information on local attractions, activities, nature and history. Media contact: Brad Damitz, 888-GOT-KELP.

NEW EVENT FEATURES CARMEL VALLEY WINES AND GALLERIES

New in summer 2005 is the Carmel Valley Wine and Art Walk, which features extended hours (open until 8:00 p.m. or later; varies by location) at local wine tasting rooms, art galleries and shops the first Friday of each month through September. Several tasting rooms, plus restaurants and shopping, are clustered in Carmel Valley Village; other establishments dot Carmel Valley Road. Combining cowboy cool and upscale style, the Carmel Valley is a sun-dappled area boasting top resort hotels, six golf courses (both public and private), and horseback riding, hiking and outdoor sports. For a full list of Carmel Valley events, visit http://www.carmelvalleychamber.com. Media contact: Randi Andrews, 831-659-9899.

NATIONAL STEINBECK CENTER SUMMER EXHIBITS AND STEINBECK FESTIVAL

The 25th Annual Steinbeck Festival (http://www.steinbeck.org) will feature four days of speakers, tours, theater, music and events on August 4-7, 2005. This year’s festival theme is “Folk, Film and Fish” and will recognize the 60th anniversary of the publication of the novel Cannery Row. Also on exhibit this summer are “The Graceful Envelope,” a Smithsonian Institution traveling exhibition featuring envelopes with unique calligraphy and stamps, and “From the Dust Bowl to the Salad Bowl,” a display of quilts made between 1930-1942, as well as music and photographs reflective of the period. Media contact: Amanda Holder, 831-775-4725.

MONTEREY COUNTY AGAIN CONTENDING FOR “AMERICA’S BIRDIEST COUNTY” TITLE

For the second time in three years, Monterey County is in the running to be named “America’s Birdiest County” by the American Birding Association, after an April bird-a-thon to document as many species as possible within 24-hours. Monterey County is nationally known as a birding hotspot, with hundreds of shore birds and migrating species living and feeding at Elkhorn Slough, Lake San Antonio, Pinnacles National Monument and Big Sur throughout the year. Volunteers for this year’s event, April 29-30, spotted 250 species of birds in the county, including the roadrunner, bald eagle, albatross and tufted puffin. Proceeds from the local event benefited the ongoing research, education and bird-banding work at Ventana Wilderness Society’s Big Sur Ornithology Lab; final results are expected in July. Media Contact: Jill Himonas, 831-373-1000.

MONTEREY’S GOLDEN STATE THEATRE RETURNS TO GRANDEUR

When the Golden State Theatre (http://www.goldenstatetheatre.com), at the center of Monterey’s historic Alvarado Street, opened in 1926, it was the largest theater between San Francisco and Los Angeles and could hold 25% of Monterey’s population. Designed to look like a Moorish castle, its Mighty Wurlitzer pipe organ and internal/external telephone system were just some of the modern amenities in the theater and performance center. The original pipe organ was sold and the space divided for movies in the 1950s and beyond; it was not until 1992 that volunteers and investors began the quest to replace the organ and restore the Golden State to its original magnificence. In May 2005 the theatre re-opened, and is now operating as a live performance and film venue, complete with a “new” 1928 Mighty Wurlitzer. A schedule is available at http://www.goldenstatetheatre.com. Media contact: Warren Dewey or Mat Molloy, 831-372-3800.

SEGWAY BY THE SEA SCOOTS ONTO CANNERY ROW

Visitors have a new way to explore the Monterey Bay Recreation Trail, now that Segway by the Sea has opened on Cannery Row. The segway, a popular two-wheeled, self-balancing, electric-powered transportation device, is designed to respond to the standing rider’s movements. Segway by the Sea offers the scooter-like machines for rental and purchase. Cannery Row (http://www.canneryrow.com) is home to more than 80 shops, restaurants and attractions. Media contact: Jennifer Ware, 831-644-9359.

MONTEREY BAY AVIATION MOVES TO NEW LOCATION

Monterey Bay Aviation (http://www.montereybayaviation.com; formerly Del Monte Aviation) has moved to the North Ramp at the Monterey Peninsula Airport, and services now include transient ramp and facilities, fuel service, hangar storage, concierge services, aviation supplies, and more. The business also offers flight instruction and special programming for pilots and those with an aviation interest, as well as scenic flight seeing tours of the Monterey Peninsula. Media contact: Donna Brady, 831-375-2359.

MONTEREY COUNTY HOTEL AND RESTAURANT NEWS

Sleep under the stars in an upscale yurt, with the waves of the Pacific crashing below, at Treebones Resort (http://www.treebonesresort.com) in Big Sur. Opened in November 2004, the resort is set on 10 tree-covered acres and features a waffle breakfast bar. Media contact: Corinne or John Handy, 877-4BIG SUR.

Marina Dunes Resort (http://www.marinadunes.com) now offers “Yoga on the Beach” classes for hotel guests and the public. The one-hour classes are held each Saturday and Sunday morning. Guests can also enjoy the Health and Wellness Package, with two nights of accommodations, beach yoga class, 60-minute massage and souvenir beach towel. Package rates start at $ 209 per night. Media contact: Lisa Dias, 831-883-9478.

Carmel Valley Ranch (http://www.wyndham.com/hotels/MRYCV/main.wnt) kicked off a multi-million dollar renovation of its 144 guest suites, resort lobby and public areas in April, using the resort’s natural surroundings as inspiration. Completion is slated for late 2005. Media contact: Amy Campbell, 214-863-1628.

Monterey Plaza Hotel & Spa (http://www.montereyplazahotel.com) completed a $ 1.3 million renovation of all guest room corridors, complete with coffered ceilings, crown molding and new wall coverings, carpet, lighting, art and furnishings. Silver Mountain and Baywood Cellar have also opened on-site wine tasting rooms. Media contact: Doug Phillips, 831-646-1700.

Ventana Inn and Spa’s (http://www.ventanainn.com) new Photography Package pairs guests with fine art photographer David Gubernick for a two-hour, photographic tour of scenic Big Sur with a digital camera supplied by the Inn. Upon completion, participants receive a print to take home. The package is for photographers at any skill level and also includes dinner for two at Cielo, two 50-minute spa treatments, daily complimentary Yoga sessions and more. Ventana Inn also celebrates its 30th anniversary in 2005; all guests staying in 2005 will receive a certificate good for 30% off a return stay valid Nov. 2005-April 2006, and past guests are invited to submit an account of their most romantic moment at the Inn for a chance to win a New Year’s Eve getaway. Media contacts: Gabriela Knubis, 707-265-7783, Kristen Hunter, 831-375-1747.

Jacks Restaurant at Portola Plaza Hotel (http://www.portolaplazahotel.com), formerly California Grill, opened after nearly five months of construction. Named after early Monterey businessman David Jacks, the restaurant features American regional flavors, a private dining room and outdoor fireside seating overlooking Custom House Plaza and Fisherman’s Wharf. Media contact: Wade Bryant, 831-649-2682.

New this summer at Big Sur River Inn (http://www.bigsurriverinn.com), Second Saturday Wine Tastings feature top Monterey County blends and live jazz each month through October. Summer at the Inn also means live music each Sunday on the Riverside Deck – a complete schedule is available at http://www.bigsurriverinn.com. Media contact: Janet Lesniak, 831-667-2700.

The Tradewinds at Carmel (http://www.tradewindsinn.com) won Best Hotel, Best Typical Room and Best Landscaping during the latest HOSPY awards from the Network of Executive Women in Hospitality. Architectural Digest also featured the hotel, which underwent $ 4 million in renovations in 2004, in its November 2004 issue. Media contact: Susan Stilwell, 831-624-2776.

Asilomar Conference Ground’s (http://www.visitasilomar.com) new self-guided walking audio tours let guests explore Asilomar State Beach and the conference grounds while learning about architecture, regional history, wildlife and ocean ecology. Also new in 2005: The cottage where Julia Morgan lived while overseeing Asilomar’s design and construction in the early 1900s is now available for rent. The refurbished, two-suite building sleeps up to six people. Media contact: Catherine Boire, 707-255-5997.

UPCOMING SUMMER AND AUTUMN EVENTS

Nearly 300 events, festivals and celebrations are scheduled annually in Monterey County. Below is a sampling of major events through October 2005. For a complete listing, along with brief descriptions and contact information, visit http://www.montereyinfo.org and click “Events.”

JULY

July 16-Aug. 6 * Carmel Bach Festival * 831-624-2046 * http://www.bachfestival.org


21-24 * California Rodeo Salinas * 800-771-8807 * http://www.carodeo.com


31 * Moss Landing Antique Street Fair * 831-633-4501

AUGUST

4-7 * 25th Annual Steinbeck Festival * 831-796-3833 * http://www.steinbeck.org


13 * 13th Annual Winemaker’s Celebration * 831-375-9400

“Shuttle Rising” Coincides With Nasa’s Return to Flight

(PRWEB) July 26, 2005

NASA astronauts will soon return to flight. Their launch to the space station will coincide with the launch of “Shuttle Rising,” a space adventure novel by one of NASA’s own, author Charles Boyle, a veteran of 32 years with the space agency.

“The mutual timing is uncanny,” said Boyle, “given that I’ve been working on this story off and on for nine years.” Asked why the novel took that long to complete, Boyle said, “Decades of writing for the government were not good preparation for writing a novel. I had to retool.”

Boyle described government writing vs novel writing with three examples:

“First, and worst, is inexperience in writing dialogue. The closest we might get is to use an occasional quote. Next, is the need to break the practice of using the passive voice, which produces lines like, ‘Mistakes were made.’ And then, because we couldn’t ‘hype’ anything, we got little practice in using adjectives. I had to go to school on such problems. It was a long apprenticeship in seminars, courses and critique groups.”

“Shuttle Rising” shows the gratifying results. Subtitled “To Rendezvous With A Rumor,” Boyle’s gripping science fiction/techno-thriller/romance rings with authenticity, clarity, drama and excitement. Set in the near future, its plot is driven by the behavior of a Russia that has returned to Communism and is undermining a proposed UN treaty to inspect all nations for weapons of mass destruction, saying the integrity of its word alone makes inspection unnecessary.

In a stealthy space rendezvous, astronaut Adam MacGregor captures a derelict rumored to be a tomb, a failed manned mission from the early days of Soviet space flight.

The US President wants it opened in space and its contents televised live to the world. He intends to refute Moscow’s claim that no cosmonaut ever died in orbit, thus reminding the world that Communists lie and cannot be trusted. At stake are wavering votes for the “Open Lands” treaty. Russia, detecting Adam’s rendezvous, warns him to retreat. Adam presses on and discovers what Moscow is really hiding: a sensational space exploit that ended in tragedy. As the Russians attack, he fights for his life and for a chance at undying love with an aroused enemy, a revenant whom gravity will kill if she returns to Earth.

Charles Boyle served as Educational Programs Manager for Earth Sciences at the Goddard Space Flight Center, near Washington, DC. Prior to NASA, he worked at Bell Labs, Esso, Scott Paper, Western Electric, and US Steel.

Boyle is the author of Tailey Whaley, an illustrated children’s book, in which a whale, born “different,” faces intolerance. His 1970’s book, Space Among Us, described many of the emerging effects of space research on society. Boyle’s writing has appeared in Science and Omni magazines. For the McGraw-Hill Encyclopedia of Science and Technology, he served as space flight editor. He wrote a column called “Space Appreciation” for the Journal of Aerospace Education and has been a contributing editor to various space advocacy publications including Space World, Ad Astra, and Aviation/Space Magazine. Time Magazine quoted from “Boyle’s Other Laws,” a gathering of his aphorisms.

Boyle received a Mechanical Engineering degree from Tulane, an M.B.A. in Business Administration from N. Y. U., and a physics major Masters in Education from Harvard.

A scuba diver, sailboat racer, and “ancient athlete,” Boyle won two gold medals in track at the 2001 National Senior Olympics. In 2004, he set a new American age-group record in the USA Track&Field Masters 3000 meter racewalk.

He served with the U.S. Maritime Service and the U.S. Navy, 1943-1947.

If a review copy is desired, please request.

Trident Publishing

1837 Cove Point Road

Annapolis, MD 21401

410-266-8523

410-266-3251 (fax)

tripub@comcast.net

Shuttle Rising by Charles Boyle

$ 15.95 paperback, 500 pages

CONTACT: Patrick Gallagher

ISBN 0-9657214-5-0

LCCN 2005902031 Pub.Date July 2005

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Blytheco Expands Nonprofit Solutions and Support Nationwide

Laguna Hills, CA (PRWEB) September 22, 2005

Blytheco is proud to announce the appointment of Mary Esslinger and Joanna Resendez to implement and support solutions for the nonprofit and governmental sectors.

Esslinger brings over 24 years experience with nonprofit organizations and high tech hardware and software companies. Resendez has a solid five years of user training, technical support, and curriculum writing in accounting and fundraising. “The addition of Mary and Joanna to the Blytheco family perpetuates our goal of a national expansion to better meet the needs of our growing national clients”, remarked President Stephen P. Blythe. “Their extensive knowledge and training experience with Sage MIP Fund Accounting and Sage Fundraising 50 (formerly MIP Paradigm) applications will provide nonprofits and governmental sectors award winning technology options to meet their organizational growth.”

Esslinger is a graduate of the University of Texas at Austin, and Resendez a graduate from Texas A&M University.

About Blytheco, Inc.

Headquartered in Laguna Hills, Blytheco specializes in streamlining business operations through Sage Software computer applications, support, and consulting services. Celebrating 25 years in Orange County, Blytheco has been a leader in creating critical business solutions, enabling businesses to process information more efficiently and effectively. Accounting, Finance, CRM and Human Resource information systems are the heart of a company’s operational success. Providing a proven strategic edge for increasing a company’s ROI, Blytheco incorporates and simplifies existing technologies to automate business processes, decrease costs, increase sales and operations, thereby, providing complete solutions for business needs. In addition to providing an extensive portfolio of products and support services, Blytheco also provides customized enhancements, organizational specific consulting services, and comprehensive on-site and classroom training programs. Blytheco is a Sage Software Master Developer, Authorized Training Center, Sage Software Certified Support Center and is honored to be Sage Software Partner of the Year. Nationwide expansion includes Arizona, Florida, Chicago Illinois, Missouri, New Jersey, New York, Ohio, and Texas.

Blytheco is proud to give back to the community via its participation in the American Cancer Society’s Relay for Life, Orangewood Children’s Home, Angel Flight, and LIGA International which is a philanthropic volunteer organization that provides medical and dental care to impoverished people in rural Mexico.

Blytheco is honored to have received the following awards from Sage Software for 2004:

2004 Sage Software Business Partner of the Year (received for 7 years)

2004 Member of the Sage Software Million Dollar Circle (received for 7 years)

2004 Sage Software President’s Circle (received for 8 years)

2004 Partner of the Year for MAS 90 and MAS 200 (received for 7 years)

Sage Software Authorized Training Center Top Performer (received for 7 years)

Sage Software Partner of the Year for MAS 500 (multiple years)

Sage Software Partner of the Year BusinessWorks (multiple years)

Additional recent awards received: