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Image from page 814 of “The Street railway journal” (1884)

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Image from page 814 of “The Street railway journal” (1884)
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Identifier: streetrailwayjo231904newy
Title: The Street railway journal
Year: 1884 (1880s)
Authors:
Subjects: Street-railroads Electric railroads Transportation
Publisher: New York : McGraw Pub. Co.
Contributing Library: Smithsonian Libraries
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rawas County. The towns are 4 miles apart, and localservice separate from the interurban line is given betweenthem. Uhrichsville is a railroad and coal center. The population of the cities and towns touched by the systemaccording to the latest census is shown in the accompanyingtable: CANTON-AKRON KAILWAY Akron 42,728 Canton 30.667 Massillon n,944 CANTON & NEW PHILADELPHIA RAILWAY Navarre 936 Beach City 364 Strasburg 461 Canal Dover 5.422 New Philadelphia 6,213 TUSCARAWAS TRACTION COMPANY Midvale 491 Tuscarawas 412 Uhrichsville 4.582 104,247 Tributary population 35.000 The Canton-Akron Railway enters Akron over the tracks ofthe Northern Ohio Traction & Light Company from EastAkron. Cars operate to the passenger station of the NorthernOhio Traction & Light Company, where they make direct con-nection with the cars of that company for Cleveland. Ticketsare sold clear through over both roads, a coupon form of ticketbeing used, giving each road its regular fare. The traffic ar-

Text Appearing After Image:
LIXE VIEW—CANTON-NEW PHILADELPHIA RAILWAY rangement with the Northern Ohio Traction & Light Companyis on the Cleveland plan. The city crew takes the interurbancar at the city limits and collects and keeps all the city fares,and the Northern Ohio Company pays the Canton-Akron Com-pany at the rate of 2 cents per car mile for the use of the carswhile on its tracks. The Canton-Akron Company gives hourlyheadway between Akron and Massillon; the Canton-NewPhiladelphia Company gives hourly headway between Massillonand New Philadelphia, and the Tuscarawas Traction Companyhourly headway between Canal Dover and Uhrichsville. Thecars connect so that a through trip is possible over all threelines without delays. Tickets are sold clear through, coupontickets being used. In Canton the city cars operate on a 10-minute headway over five routes, all cars passing the interurban station, which, with the general offices of the companies, islocated in the basement of the Court House Building, facingC

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# 1526 Baldwin Locomotive
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Image by Fidgit the Time Bandit
The first display reads:

# 1526 Baldwin Locomotive

"The Queen of the Frisco Railroad rolled into Lawton, Oklahoma on Friday, July 7, 1961 on her last journey."

Baldwin Locomotive Works in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania is one of the most successful builders of locomotives in the world. The company was founded by Matthias W. Baldwin, a jeweler who opened and operated a machine shop. Prior to 1830, the Philadelphia Museum commissioned him to build a miniature locomotive to help demonstrate the concept of steam locomotive technology. Completed in 1831, the success of the minature model resulted in his first order for a full sized locomotive by the Philadelphia, Germantown and Norristown Railroad which was completed in 1832. His business boomed at the turn of the century, when demand for locomotives expanded.

The second display reads:

Whyte Wheel Classification

F.M. Whyte, a mechanical engineer, initiated a way to classify the number of wheels each locomotive steam engine had. This system used in the 20th century, is still being used today.

A zero classification for the front wheels indicates an engine that pulls at slow speeds. Two front wheels signify medium speeds. This locomotive has four front wheels, two on each side. It tells us the engine is used for high speed service, such as passenger service and priority weight. When a larger firebox is pulled by the locomotive, it needs more trailing wheels to carry the load.

Engine 1526: Configuration 4-8-2

oo-OOOO-o

4 – The first number represents the number of small wheels in front of the locomotive, called leading or pilot wheels. These wheels give not only support but stability to the cylinders and smoke box.

8 – The second number represents the number of wheels that actually drive and support the massive weight of the locomotive. These wheels, called driving wheels, are larger than the pilot or trailing wheels.

2 – The third number represents the number of wheels that support the weight of the boiler firebox in the cab. These wheels are called trailing wheels.

The final display reads:

St. Louis – San Francisco Mountains Locomotives

The "Frisco"

The St. Louis – San Francisco Railway bought a total of thirty 4-8-2s from the Baldwin Locomotive Works to be used in passenger service. Fifteen (road numbers 1500 through 1514) were delivered in 1923, five (road numbers 1515 through 1519) came in 1925 and the final ten (road numbers 1520 through 1529) arrived in 1926.

There are six surviving SLSF "Mountains" Locomotives:

– 1501 at a city park in Rolla, MO
– 1519 at the Railroad Museum of NW Oklahoma in Enid, OK
– 1522 at the Museum of Transportation in St. Louis, MO
– 1526 at the Museum of the Great Plains in Lawton, OK
– 1527 at Spring Hill Park in Mobile, AL
– 1529 at Frisco Park in Amory, MS

Specifications for the 1526 Locomotive:

Road Numbers / Year Built / Builder / Locomotive Weight
1500 – 1514 / 1923 / Baldwin / 339,800 lbs.
1515 – 1519 / 1925 / Baldwin / 342,200 lbs.
1520 – 1529 / 1926 / Baldwin / 260,890 lbs.

Wheel Arrangement: 4-8-2
Grate Area: 70.5 square feet
Length Drivers: 88′ 6"
Cylinders: (2) 28" dia. x 28" stroke
Weight on Drivers: 248,520 lbs.
Boiler Pressure: 210 psi
Tractive Effort: 56,800 lbs.
Tender Capacity: Water- 11,700 gallons / Oil- 4,500 gallons
Total Locomotive Weight: 360,890 lbs.
Locomotive & Tender Weight: 958,890 lbs.
Aux. Tender Capacity: 13,000 gallons of water

Taken July 7th, 2012.

Kawasaki Trolleys at Callowhill Depot
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Image from page 318 of “The Street railway journal” (1884)

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Image from page 318 of “The Street railway journal” (1884)
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Image by Internet Archive Book Images
Identifier: streetrailwayjo191902newy
Title: The Street railway journal
Year: 1884 (1880s)
Authors:
Subjects: Street-railroads Electric railroads Transportation
Publisher: New York : McGraw Pub. Co.
Contributing Library: Smithsonian Libraries
Digitizing Sponsor: Smithsonian Libraries

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t, and that there is a hingingbreak in the coaming, plank-sheer and upper strake, which permitof easy ingress and egress, so that the boat can be loaded andunloaded with rapidity, thus avoiding any unnecessary delays.The launch was operated with great success by the Omaha &Council Bluffs Railway last summer, and proved a good invest- NAME PLATEMACHINE March i, 1902.] STREET RAILWAY JOURNAL. ment. The Electric Launch Company of Bayonne City, N. J.,builder of this boat, has recently adopted for its pleasure launchesthe new lightweight type of battery, which is about 35 per cent,lighter in weight than that hitherto used for marine purposes. ELECTRIC FOUNTAINSLike the electric launch, this is an amusement which is particu-larly suitable for street railway parks, from the fact that electriccurrent for the operation of the fountain is always available, andany mechanic who can understand the handling of a railway motoris sufficiently adept to understand the electrical requirements of the

Text Appearing After Image:
TWO VARIETIES OF ELECTRIC FOUNTAINS fountain apparatus. From the time that the electric fountainestablished its reputation as a popular amusement at the WorldsFair in Chicago, in 1893, it has kept a foremost place in the listof popular and decorative effects at amusement resorts. Thishas been due largely to the efforts of the Darlington ElectricFountain & Supply Company, of Philadelphia, which is the fore-most if not practically the only builder of these fountains in thiscountry, and which has made a specialty of the subject, so that itnow builds fountains suitable for the largest parks or for smallerenterprises, and even, if requested, small enough for banquettables. The variety of displays is almost limitless, as by chang-ing the colors, direction and shape of the jets an endless varietyin colors and displays can be secured. In this way an audience the Chicago chute, which was built in 1894, were about ,000.Chutes in Baltimore, Atlantic City, Atlanta, San Francisco andelsewhe

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Image from page 60 of “American railway transportation” (1908)
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Identifier: americanrailwayt1908john
Title: American railway transportation
Year: 1908 (1900s)
Authors: Johnson, Emory R. (Emory Richard), 1864-1950
Subjects: Railroads Railroads and state
Publisher: New York, D. Appleton and company
Contributing Library: Mugar Memorial Library, Boston University
Digitizing Sponsor: Boston University

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li^i Uiiai liDAD vc*ji2 iiifj) ^^iijAX l^A^•l{I3»^2, From Philadelphia to Pittsburgh, THROUGH IN 3i DAYS: -».VO BV STE^.^ BO^TS, CIRBXMJVG THE V^TiTEO STATES Jit.tMMf% From PIlTKBlIRCiH lo LOIIISVIUE

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Image from page 1186 of “The Street railway journal” (1884)

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Image from page 1186 of “The Street railway journal” (1884)
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Image by Internet Archive Book Images
Identifier: streetrailwayjo181901newy
Title: The Street railway journal
Year: 1884 (1880s)
Authors:
Subjects: Street-railroads Electric railroads Transportation
Publisher: New York : McGraw Pub. Co.
Contributing Library: Smithsonian Libraries
Digitizing Sponsor: Smithsonian Libraries

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fg. Co. H. W. Johns Mfg. Co. Okonite Co. Bethlehem Iron Co. Eugene Munsell & Co. Garton-Daniels Electric Co. McCardeU, West & Co. Robert W. BlackweU. Safety Third Rail Electric Co. Standard Air Brake Co. Dick, Kerr & Co. Risdon Iron Works. E. H. Cadiot & Co. Lorain Steel Co. Westinghouse Electric & Mfg. Co.General Electric Co.Jackson & Sharp Co.Peckham Truck Co.Baltimore Car Wheel Co.American Metal Co. Lewisohn Bros.Carnegie Steel Co.John Stephenson Co.Baldwin Locomotive Works.Brown Hoisting & Convejdng Machine Co.J. G. BriU Co. Christensen Engineering Co.Berlin Iron Bridge Co.B. F. Sturtevant Co.Riter-Conley Mfg. Co.Ball & Wood Co.A. L. Ide & Sons.Springfield Mfg. Co.Edwin Harrington Son & Co.J. A. Fay & Egan Co.Worthington Pump Co.Babcock & Wilcox Co.Westinghouse Alr-Brake Co.Manning, Maxwell & Moore. LIEBER CODE CO., 2 and 4 STONE STREET 20 BUCKLERSBURY, NEW YORK. LONDON, E.G. STREET RAILWAY JOURNAL. 239 ..Alw^yj* in Se&.son..

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SECTIONAL VIEW Aly/^yj* Ventile^ting DAY AND NIGHT RAIN OR SHINE Also VENTILATORS FOR EXPORT Power Houses and Buildings Ventilated AT LITTLE COST U/E have equipped Power Houses and Buildings all overthe world—suck as the KOLGOORLIE TRAMWAY CO., . . AustraliaST. CH.-RLES STREET RY. CO., . New OrleansGALVESTON CITY RY. CO., . Galveston, TexasPEEKSKILL LIGHTING & R.R. CO., Peekskill, N. YYOUNGSTOWN GAS & ELEC. CO., Youngstown, O. AND MANY OTHERS We luill be pleased to send you our new catalogue and sample andgive you an estimate. PANCOAST INTERNATIONAL VENTILATOR CO. manufacturers IMPROVED TAN-COAST VENTILATORSSalesroom and Office. 223 and 225 SOUTH FIFTH ST.. PHILADELPHIA Offices, NEW YORK and LONDON ELECTRIC MOTOR AND GENERATOR VENTILATING CO. 421 Chestnut Street, Philadelphia. Our new ventilator is a simple and efiicient device for carrying coldair direct to the motor case, fr< m the hood through hose under car. orfrom the funnel at top as may be preferrtd. Will vemilate

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Image from page 807 of “The Street railway journal” (1884)
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Identifier: streetrailwayjo291907newy
Title: The Street railway journal
Year: 1884 (1880s)
Authors:
Subjects: Street-railroads Electric railroads Transportation
Publisher: New York : McGraw Pub. Co.
Contributing Library: Smithsonian Libraries
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THE LIMA CAR HOUSE, WITH GATES BETWEEN THE TRACKS water which may accumulate in the pits,as there are no public drains and thereis no other way of accomplishing this.A large room is provided for the motor-men and conductors, and the office pro-vides ample space for the manager, elec-trical and civil engineers, traffic manager,accountant, cashier, etc. Adjoining thecar house is a house for the car housesuperintendent. The cars are of the eight-bench opentype, fully described in the Street Rail-way Journal of April 7, 1906. As thegovermnent requires the use of airbrakes, it was found necessary to placethe compressor under one end of theseats and the tank under the other. Thebrake cylinder is also placed under oneend of the car. The trucks are of thesolid steel Columbian type, 6 ft. 6 ins.wheel base. G. E. No. 54 double motorequipments are used on all these cars.

Text Appearing After Image:
Street Uy.Journal PLAN OF CAR HOUSE, SHOP AND OFFICE BUILDINGS May 4, 1907.] STREET RAILWAY JOURNAL. 795 At present there are forty-eight-bench cars, and in additiontwo sprinklers, two meat cars and a work car with derrick.The G. E. No. 80 double motor equipment is used on thelatter cars. Twenty additional eight-bench open cars havealready been ordered and will be re-quired as soon as received. The tramway system was designed bythe well-known American engineer, A.W. McLimont, who has also directedthe installation. The entire electricalequipment was supplied by the GeneralElectric Company; the open cars by theStephenson works of the J. G. Brill Com-pany, of Philadelphia; the trutks andspecial cars by the McGuire-CummingsCompany, of Chicago, and the poles,brackets, etc., by the Elmer P. MorrisCompany, of New York. All of theorders were placed through the firm ofW. R. Grace & Company, of New York. *^^ favor of a double-jointed current collector very similar tothat used on the same co

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Image from page 9 of “Ceremonies upon the completion of the monument erected by the Pennsylvania Railroad Company at Bordentown, New Jersey, to mark the first piece of track laid between New York and Philadelphia, 1831, November 12, 1891” (1891)
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Identifier: ceremoniesupon00penn
Title: Ceremonies upon the completion of the monument erected by the Pennsylvania Railroad Company at Bordentown, New Jersey, to mark the first piece of track laid between New York and Philadelphia, 1831, November 12, 1891
Year: 1891 (1890s)
Authors: PENNSYLVANIA RAILROAD CO
Subjects: Camden and Amboy Railroad and Transportation Company
Publisher: Washington, D.C., William F. Roberts
Contributing Library: Smithsonian Libraries
Digitizing Sponsor: Smithsonian Libraries

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r R. R. and Transportation Co., 85 Philadelphia and Trenton R. R. Co., . . . . 87 89 ev Jersey Co., 90 New Jersey Controlled by Pennsylvania R. R. 91 from John Stevens Concerning Railroads in Pennsyl- 93 ts Concerning the Celebration, . . . . 95 ne of the Baltimore and Susquehanna R. R., . .101 ■ ILLUSTRATIONS..lent at Bordentown, . . Ceremonies and Program, He of Lei rt L. Stevens Ordering the First ig Cross Section and Plan, >inotive John Bull, lid Arch at Bordentown, and lahway and Jersey City, 1841, . Frontispiece facing page ii iv 6 2934 4244

Text Appearing After Image:
1 Ceremonies upon the Completion OF THE MS NUMENT ERECTED BY THE PENNSYLVANIA RAILROAD QO AT FjORDENTOWN, NEW JERSEY, TO MARK THE FIRST PIECE OFTRACK LAID BETWEEN NEWYORK AND PHILADELPHIA, I 83 I, November 12, 1891. PUBLISHED FOR THE PENNSYLVANIA RAILROAD CO. BY GEDNEV & ROBERTS, WASHINGTON, D. C.

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Broad Street Station, Pennsylvania Railroad Depot, Philadelphia

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Broad Street Station, Pennsylvania Railroad Depot, Philadelphia
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Image by Cornell University Library
Collection: A. D. White Architectural Photographs, Cornell University Library
Accession Number: 15/5/3090.00520

Title: Broad Street Station, Pennsylvania Railroad Depot, Philadelphia

Photographer: R. and Son Newell (American, active ca. 1860-ca. 1899)
Architect: Frank Furness (American, 1839-1912)

Building Date: 1881-1893
Photograph date: ca. 1881-ca. 1899

Location: North and Central America: United States; Pennsylvania, Philadelphia

Materials: collodion DOP

Image: 9 1/2 x 7 5/8 in.; 24.13 x 19.3675 cm

Provenance: Gift of Andrew Dickson White

Persistent URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1813.001/5smw

There are no known U.S. copyright restrictions on this image. The digital file is owned by the Cornell University Library which is making it freely available with the request that, when possible, the Library be credited as its source.

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What you bribe is what you get / 20090905.10D.53065.SQ / SML
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Image by See-ming Lee 李思明 SML
The not-too-typical cell from the Eastern State Penitentiary. Compare to the typical cell arrangement.

This was the cell of Al Capone (Wikipedia), an American gangster who led a crime syndicate dedicated to smuggling and bootlegging of liquor and other illegal activities during the Prohibition Era of the 1920s and 1930s.

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+ SML Photo Blog: Eastern State Penitentiary

A Short History Of Street Dance Footwear

Unlike all the other dance footwear, dance shoes sneakers can be worn not only for dancing but also for everyday wear. This is not surprising since the whole history of urban dance is the history of people dancing in what they wear regularly rather than wearing something special for their dance.

It is hard to say for sure which dance was the first street dance. The term itself is not very clear, but, to put it simply, a street dance is a kind of dance which is developed in urban areas outside theatres and dance schools. In this manner the American traditional jazz dance can be considered as the first dance to be widely performed on the streets of large cities. So it can be said that the first dance shoes sneakers were jazz shoes.

Similar to jazz, hip-hop culture evolved from the African American culture. Different dance styles emerged from it such as break-dancing, popping and locking. Break-dancing, being very different from all other types of dance in the sense that it includes such movements as putting the whole bodyweight on the dancer’s head, became very popular around the world by the middle of the 90s. In the same way, the clothing that hip hop stars and break-dancers used to wear was popularised. Multicoloured big dance shoes sneakers became irreplaceable in the wardrobe of any hip-hop music lover.

Another type of street dance is house dance. Similar to hip-hop this dance was created by African Americans and was spread around the planet quickly. It incorporates many movements from other dances such as Capoeira, tap, jazz, bebop and salsa. Developed in the night clubs of Chicago almost at the same time as hip-hop, house dance incorporated some movements from it. Just as in the case with break-dancing comfortable footwear is important to the dance and casual dance shoes sneakers serve as an important part of the club look.

Other popular street dance forms evolved around rave culture. Those are glowsticking, candy walk, jumpstyle, hakken, kandi stomping, hardstyle shuffle, x-outing, tecktonick and many other types of electro dance. All these dance styles involve intensive footwork, similar to that of an athlete. Usually it was hard to spot anybody dancing in anything other than differently-coloured dance shoes sneakers at rave parties, primarily because of the comfort and stylish looks they provided.

The bottom line is that just like street dance is all about improvisation, dance shoes sneakers can be of any style and any colour. The brand does not really matter. People can dance in anything they want providing that their shoes are comfortable.

However, since the evolvement of tournaments and dance competitions within many of previously underground clubs, more sophisticated and professional dancers may choose something different from casual footwear. In such cases professionals are likely to pay special attention to the weight of the shoe and its flexibility. Some brands nowadays even develop specifically designed dance shoes sneakers made exclusively for dancing and not for walking. Such sneakers are usually made of high-quality canvas or leather and normally feature ankle straps and special heels designed for greater cushioning during jumps and stomps.

For further information regarding our range of dance shoes sneakers and other dance products, please visit our website at http://www.dancedirect.com.

Related History Of South Street Articles

The History Of Frederick Street The World Over

Take a number of the world’s cities and you’ll find, more often than not, a handful of them share similar street names. While the intrigue might stop there, some streets in particular have a more colourful history than others; such as the Frederick Streets of Dunedin, Berlin and Edinburgh where war, immigration and the develop of architecture all play a prominent role.

 

Frederick Street in Berlin, Germany has a particularly important history. Bisected during the Cold War and the location of Checkpoint Charlie (the crossing between East and West Germany), Frederick Street was also the crossing point for trains between the two divisions. At the Frederick Street station, security was very strict and passengers could not cross between the two platforms without documents and papers. Nowadays, Frederick Street is a popular shopping district and has benefited from significant refurbishment since the war.

 

Thousands of miles beyond Europe, the Fredrick Street of Dunedin in New Zealand has a very unique history indeed. The seventh largest urban area in New Zealand, Dunedin takes its name from the Scottish Gaelic name for Edinburgh. When European settlers arrived in the mid 1800s, the Free Church of Scotland quickly asserted its presence, followed by designs and architecture that attempted to emulate Scotland’s capital. Sitting proudly in the heart of the city, Frederick Street boasts some of the city’s oldest buildings.

 

With New Zealand settlers taking inspiration from Scotland, it’s no wonder that Edinburgh still retains its own Frederick Street. Built in the early 1800s, Edinburgh’s Frederick Street was part of the city’s ‘New Town’ development which saw a move away from traditional medieval tenement living towards the opulence of Georgian design. Today, an Edinburgh Fredrick Street Hotel will still play host to some of the city’s much talked about glitterati as well as overseas visitors looking for accommodation that’s a cut above.

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Spruce Street House Lops Off Another $200K, Now Asks $2.1M

Spruce Street House Lops Off Another 0K, Now Asks .1M
It's pretty rare to see a 5,000 square-foot house on the market in Society Hill. What's more shocking, this 20-foot wide dreamboat at 417 Spruce St. just won't sell. Originally listed in Sept. 2013 for $ 2.8M, this place has been taking the plunge ever …
Read more on Curbed National

Man arrested at strip club considered a “danger to society
SPRINGFIELD, Mass. (WWLP) – No bail for a man from South Hadley who was arrested with a shotgun outside a Springfield strip club. A judge found 51-year-old John Peloquin to be a “danger to society,” and ordered him held without bail for four months.
Read more on wwlp.com

Group buys River City Tire in Clifton
Architect Charles Cash, who lives in Crescent Hill, said had submitted a couple of redevelopment schemes to the Waldeyers, one that included demolishing the entire complex and building a 2 1/2- to three-story residential building and another that kept …
Read more on The Courier-Journal

Jasper Hill wins world championship of raw-milk cheese
BURLINGTON, Vt. — Mateo Kehler, co-owner of Jasper Hill Farm, on Tuesday described his Greensboro neighborhood — north of the village and up a hill — as a "vortex of quality." Within a couple of miles of each other are two businesses that produce …
Read more on USA TODAY

The History Of Harley Street Dentists

No one is really quite sure where the trend comes from or how it originated but it seems that in London certain types of business genres are known to congregate together. For sure London is one of the older cities on the planet, so it might even be a trend that can be traced back to the ancient Romans who first named the city Londinium.

Either way, anyone who lives there now knows that for instance Fleet Street is now the central hub of the news print business. Several of them have long made it their base of operations with newer start up publications popping up from time to time there. Then there is Carnaby Street.

Carnaby Street is synonymous with the fashion industry in London. Several design houses, wholesalers and a host of various retail outlets have for years operated on, and around this particular street. Why they chose that street, no one really knows for sure. Then there is Harley Street.

Harley Street is now ground-zero for the medical profession in the greater London area and that of course includes dentistry. It all began sometime back around the mid 1800s, and the trend has grown over the years to the point where some three-thousand people now work in various medical professions there.

The Harley Street area and the dentists who work there have also been part of history in the making, with regards to a number of dental developments that have taken place over the years. Dental implants are but one, a procedure that first became known to the Harley Street dentists as experiment back in the 1950s.

It was the discovery that titanium when implanted into the human body had a tendency to actually fuse to bone,  (osseointegration), that gave rise to the original research concepts that were to eventually become artificial teeth. Brand new man made teeth, rooted into the bone that look and function just like normal teeth in all respects.

Then of course Harley Street dentist have ridden the tide of popularity of dental veneers as this new procedure was developed and perfected over the past handful of decades. Today veneers are more affordable, more quickly done, and solve more cosmetic issues in more people’s smiles who visit the dentists of Harley Street to look and feel better.

So then why Harley Street in the first place? Of all the streets that were available to drop anchor on, and start to congregate, what is it about this one street in particular that had the first 20 or so dentists working there? The answer to that it turns out is really quite simple and makes such good common sense.

It’s the close proximity to the major train stations of Kings Cross and St Pancreas that are decidedly the reasons for the area being selected by doctors and dentists. Back in those earlier times people really didn’t seek out medical help unless it was a more serious affair. Taking a train meant that suffering patients didn’t have to walk or ride in a bumpy carriage.

39 Harley Street are a leading Dentist Harley Street. They offer a range of services including whitening, veneers and dental implants in London and to the UK. For more details visit: http://www.39harleystreet.co.uk