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Image from page 9 of “Modern travel, a record of exploration, travel” (1921)

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Image from page 9 of “Modern travel, a record of exploration, travel” (1921)
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Identifier: moderntravelreco00davi
Title: Modern travel, a record of exploration, travel
Year: 1921 (1920s)
Authors: Davidson, Norman James. [from old catalog]
Subjects: Voyages and travels
Publisher: Philadelphia, J. B. Lippincott company London, Seeley, Service & co., ltd.
Contributing Library: The Library of Congress
Digitizing Sponsor: The Library of Congress

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Member of the Scottish Nat-ional Antarctic Expedition 1902-04 ;Medalist, R.S.G.S ; Cuthbert PeekGrant, R.G.S. Many Illustrations&> 3 Maps. Demy 8vo. 255. net. Second Edition. Unexplored New Guinea. A Record of the Travels, Adventurescsr Experiences of a Resident Magi-strate amongst the Head-HuntingSavages Ss Cannibals of the Unex-plored Interior of New Guinea. ByWilfred N. Beavek, with an In-troduction by A. C. HADDON, M.A.,Sc.D., F.R.S. With 24 Illustrations<y 4 Maps. Demy 8vo. 25s. net. Modern Whaling and Bear- Huutingf. A Record of Present-day Whalingwith Up-to-date Appliances in manyParts of the World, and of Bearand Seal Hunting in the ArcticRegions. By W. G. Burn Murdoch,F.R.S.G.S. With 110 Illustrations.Demy Bvo, 21s. net. Third. Edition. Prehistoric Man ^ His Story. A Sketch of the History of Mankindfrom the Earliest Times. By Prof.G.F.Scott Elliot, M. A. (Cantab),B.Sc.(Edin.), F.R.S.E., F.L.S.,F.R.G.S. With 62 Illustrations.IDS. 6d. net. SEELEY, SERVICE is CO. LTD.

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Captain Haywoods Arab Guide, Mahomed-Ben-Kaid Kaddour This man, to whose skill and endurance he was indebted for safely ciossing some eight hundredmiles of the Sahara wastes, was a typical, hardy desert wanderer. With a cupful of water and ahandful of dates as his daily ration he would bear the scorching heat and suffocating sandstormswithout showing any signs of fatigue. MODERN TRAVEL A RECORD OF EXPLORATION TRAVEL ADVENTURE & SPORT IN ALL PARTS OF THE V^ORLD DURING THE LAST FORTY YEARS DERIVED FROM PERSONAL ACCOUNTS BY THE TRAVELLERS BY NORMAN J. DAVIDSON, B.A. (Oxon.) Author of Romance of the Spanish Main,* Things Seen in Oxford, (£f c, &c. With 5J illustrations l^ lo maps PHILADELPHIAJ. B. LIPPINCOTT COMPANY LONDON : SEELEY, SERVICE & CO., Ltd.I92I k^^ CONTENTS CHAPTER I PAGE Hunting Mighty Game . . . . . . .17 CHAPTER II Hunting Mighty Game—continued . . . . .26 CHAPTER III Hunting Mighty Game—continued . . . . .31 CHAPTER IVThe Ice-bound Shores of Labrador …..moderntravelreco00davi

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Image from page 160 of “A trip to the Orient; the story of a Mediterranean cruise” (1907)
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Identifier: triptoorientstor00jacorich
Title: A trip to the Orient; the story of a Mediterranean cruise
Year: 1907 (1900s)
Authors: Jacob, Robert Urie
Subjects: Middle East — Description and travel
Publisher: Philadelphia, The J. C. Winston co
Contributing Library: University of California Libraries
Digitizing Sponsor: MSN

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th anger. It w^as not the regular hour for prayer in the mosque,but a number of worshipers were devoutly kneelingat different places in the interior, with faces turnedtoward a black stone in the south wall, which indi-cated the direction of the holy city of Mecca. Others,squatting on their bare heels, were reading or recitingin monotonous tones parts of the Koran. There areno benches or chairs in the building; Moslem worshipersdo not require seats while at their devotions. Thegreat dome, over one hundred feet in width, rises ingrandeur one hundred and eighty feet overhead, sup-ported by four huge columns each seventy feet in circum-ference. A circle of windows, forty-four in number,around the dome illumines the golden mosaics whichcover the ceiling. A mosaic picture in the domerepresenting the Almighty, has been obliterated by theTurks and covered with green linen cloth. A versefrom the Koran, in gilt Arabic characters almost thirtyfeet long, is painted on this cloth. The sentence, as

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THROUGH THE NARROW STREETS OF THE CITY.(149) I50 A TRIP TO THE ORIENT. translated, begins: God is the light of heaven andearth, and ends, God alone sheddeth His light onwhomsoever He pleaseth. If the Moslems believe in the Bible and in God as asupreme being, why did the}^ destroy the mosaic repre-sentation of God on the ceiling? inquired one of thevisitors. The Moslems do believe in the Bible and in oneSupreme God, was the reply, and it was this verybelief that led them to paint out the picture of Godand to destroy all the images and paintings of saints;for Gods command is: Thou shalt not make unto theeany graven image, or any likeness of anything that is inthe heaven above, or that is in the earth beneath,or that is in the water under the earth. Thou shalt notbow down thyself to them. The Moslems, continued the guide, regardMahomet as the Prophet of God, and the Koran aswritten by him under the inspiration of God; but theydo not worship Mahomet or any image or picture ofhim. We pause

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Image from page 385 of “View of the valley of the Mississippi, or, The emigrant’s and traveller’s guide to the West : containing a general description of that entire country : and also notices of the soil, productions, rivers, and other channels of interc
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Identifier: viewofvalleyofmi00bair
Title: View of the valley of the Mississippi, or, The emigrant’s and traveller’s guide to the West : containing a general description of that entire country : and also notices of the soil, productions, rivers, and other channels of intercourse and trade : and likewise of the cities and towns, progress of education, &c. of each state and territory
Year: 1834 (1830s)
Authors: Baird, Robert, 1798-1863
Subjects: Mississippi River Valley United States
Publisher: Philadelphia : H.S. Tanner
Contributing Library: New York Public Library
Digitizing Sponsor: MSN

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enerally con-stitutes every second line of the song. These chorussesare usually an unmeaning string of words, such as Ohio,Ohio, Oh-i-o ; or O hang, boys, hang ; or O stormy,stormy, &;c. When tired with the insipid gabble of thecard-table in the cabin, or disinclined to converse withany one, I have spent hours in listening to the boat songsof these men. In conclusion, I would remark that it is the testimonyof the captains with whom I have conversed, that thetemperance reform is making gradual progress on boardthe steam-boats of the West. On hoard the boat onwhich this chapter loas written^ no ardent spirits aredrunk by either officers or men. Still, much remains tobe done. But I must close this long, but still imperfect, accountof the steam-boats in the Valley of the Mississippi. 34i^ ige anditc. &c. n as I3llers,of theiteredf our )ne of! Val-of the ^7W vhich statevhichy and _,. nn of TILD-^N FOt pass. ——–^ Eng- to it!., asjver,ining)n on)r byhichBuf.nces 73 80 96 105 113

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HINTS TO EMIGRANTS, ETC. 341^ CHAPTER XXVIII. Hints to Emigrants on the modes of removing to the West.—Stage andSteam-boat Routes.—Expenses of removing, and of travelling, &c. &c. I PROPOSE to give, in this chapter, such information as Iam able, which may be useful to emigrants and travellers,respecting the various modes of going to the Valley of theMississippi, and the expenses which must be encounteredby those who travel, or remove, to that part of ourcountry. There are three general and grand routes, some one ofwhich must be pursued by every one who visits the Val-ley of the Mississippi, from the states which lie east of theAllegheny Mountains:— I. By the Lakes on the north.—This is the route whichemigrants and travellers from New England and the stateof New York will pursue. There are two points whichall of the first named class will aim at, viz.: Albany andBuffalo. The major part of the New York column ofemigration will have only the latter named place to pass. As

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Image from page 357 of “King’s handbook of Springfield, Massachusetts : a series of monographs, historical and descriptive” (1884)
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Identifier: kingshandbookofs00king
Title: King’s handbook of Springfield, Massachusetts : a series of monographs, historical and descriptive
Year: 1884 (1880s)
Authors: King, Moses, 1853-1909 Clogston, William
Subjects: Springfield (Mass.) — Description and travel Springfield (Mass.) — Bibliography
Publisher: Springfield, Mass. : J.D. Gill, Publisher
Contributing Library: New York Public Library
Digitizing Sponsor: MSN

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NGS HANDBOOK OF SPRINGFIELD. made a specialty. Here the finest line of covered buttons in the countryare manufactured. The coverings of soutache, velvet, lasting, mohair, areimported, and pure dye sewing-silk braid is of American manufacture. Thethird floor of the main building is used for drilling and finishing thevegetable-ivory buttons. The second building, which is directly acrossthe street, and reached by a bridge from the main building, has the sameexcellent arrangement. The first floor is devoted to the dyeing of vege-table-ivory buttons; the second floor, to the ornamenting and chemicaldepartments ; the third, to carding, and to the packing of the buttons; andthe fourth, to the manufacture of boxes. The average amount of workturned out by the company is 3,000 gross a day. The W. G. Medlicott Company, manufacturers of full-fashioned knitgoods, have their mills on Morris Street. Since the business was estab-lished in this city, the company have prospered and grown so that to-day

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The W G. Medlicott Co.s Mills, on Morris Street. they stand among the leading industries of the valley. They are now theonly mills in Springfield where textile goods are manufactured; and, whilethere are many in the country that are larger, there are none better equippedor appointed. The machinery is all of the most approved patterns, and thegoods which these mills put upon the market are acknowledged of superiormake and finish. The products of the mills are mens, womens, and chil-drens underwear, all grades of Shetland Scotch wool, white merino, whiteScotch wool, scarlet wool; fancy colored merino goods also being made.The market is supplied through the companys selling-agents, — Brown,Wood, & Kingman, who have houses at New York, Boston, Philadelphia,and Chicago. The W. G. Medlicott Company was established in 1S81, by ~7$ W I .y<=; S Jr 21 -*-i i DJ ^ rs c ^f e/3

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Image from page 295 of “Illustrated catalogue and general description of improved machine tools for working metal” (1899)
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Identifier: illustratedcatal00sell
Title: Illustrated catalogue and general description of improved machine tools for working metal
Year: 1899 (1890s)
Authors: Sellers, William, & co. [from old catalog]
Subjects: Machine-tools Machinery
Publisher: Philadephia, Levytype company
Contributing Library: The Library of Congress
Digitizing Sponsor: The Library of Congress

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15-TON ELECTRIC TRAVELLING CRANE.In Machine-Shop of Wm. Sellers & Co., Incorporated. 32 ft. span. Fixed drum, single motor type. Runs on track supportedwholly from roof. Head room available was very limited, and the bridge girdersare only 33 deep. 290 Wm. Sellers & Co., Incorporated, Philadelphia, Pa. Plate No. 239.

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15-TON POWER TRAVELLING CRANE. In the Erecting-Shop of the Geo. F. Blake Mfg. Co. 41 ft. span. Runway 330 ft. long. As shown it was driven b} a squareshaft carried in our patent bearings. After many years of successful service asingle electric motor was attached to the crane and the square shaft removed. Wm. Sellers & Co., Incorporated, Philadelphia, Pa. 2gi Plate No. 240.

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Image from page 80 of “Book of the Royal blue” (1897)
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Identifier: bookofroyalblue19balt
Title: Book of the Royal blue
Year: 1897 (1890s)
Authors: Baltimore and Ohio railroad company. [from old catalog]
Subjects: Middle Atlantic States — Description and travel
Publisher: Baltimore
Contributing Library: The Library of Congress
Digitizing Sponsor: Sloan Foundation

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A TEN DAY stop-over at Philadelphia is granted on all one-way first class limited ticketsto New York or points east thereof, via Baltimore & Ohio R. R. Passengers desir-ing stop-over will notify conductor prior to arrival at Philadelphia, so that tickets may beproperly endorsed. Tickets must be deposited with ticket agent at B. & 0. station,Twenty-Fourth and Chestnut Streets, Philadelphia, immediately on arrival, who will issueexchange ticket good on all trains between Philadelphia and New York via Bound Brookline, and which will be honored for passage from any P. & R. R. R. depot in Philadelphiafrom which New York trains are run. 8topO vcr 0rivikgc at ^aehington

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NEW CONGRESSIONAL LIBRARY. WASHINGTON. D, C. A TEN DAY stop-over at Washington. D. C, is granted on all through tickets betweenthe East and West, via Baltimore & Ohio R, R. Stop-over will also be granted onthe return journey on round-trip tickets, within the final limit of such tickets, but notexceeding ten days. Passengers desiring stop-over will notify conductor prior to arrival atWashington, so that tickets may be properly endorsed. Tickets must be deposited withticket agent at B. &. O. station in Washington immediately on arrival, who will retain themuntil the journey is to be resumed, when they will be made good for continuous passageto destination by extension or exchange. This arrangement will doubtless be greatly appre-ciated by the traveling public, because it will permit the holders of through tickets to makea brief visit to the National Capital without additional outlay for railroad fare.

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Image from page 154 of “The book of Boston” (1916)
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Identifier: bookofboston00shack
Title: The book of Boston
Year: 1916 (1910s)
Authors: Shackleton, Robert, 1860-1923
Subjects: Boston (Mass.) — Description and travel
Publisher: Philadelphia, The Penn publishing company
Contributing Library: The Library of Congress
Digitizing Sponsor: Sloan Foundation

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ade a little more than a century ago. The hall itself, above the public market, is neverrented, but is forever to be used freely by the peoplewhenever they wish to meet together to discuss pub-lic affairs; and this alone would make the buildingproudly notable. And many a great man, and manya man who was deeply in earnest even if not great,has spoken in this hall. And it is still used freelyfor the public meetings of to-day. The meeting hall, almost square, has a right-angledarrangement of seats, and, with its rows of Doriccolumns, is quite distinguished. And one notices thata winding stairway leads down from the very floorof the speakers platform and wonders if it is to facili-tate the entrance of popular speakers in case of agreat crowd, or, on the other hand, to facilitate thehasty exit of the unpopular! One notices, too, thatthe balcony has peculiar effectiveness of proportion,adding much to the effectiveness of the entire hall,and further notices, as an additional point on the 134

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Image from page 391 of “Book of the Royal blue” (1897)
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Identifier: bookofroyalblue11balt
Title: Book of the Royal blue
Year: 1897 (1890s)
Authors: Baltimore and Ohio railroad company. [from old catalog]
Subjects: Middle Atlantic States — Description and travel
Publisher: Baltimore
Contributing Library: The Library of Congress
Digitizing Sponsor: Sloan Foundation

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e the greatestdetriment to the character of the train thatcould be conceived, as a traveler is generallysupersensitive on the subject of eating. To quote from the pamphlet: The Royal Limited trains of theRoyal Blue Line between Washington,Baltimore, Philadelphia and New York areelectrically equipped with fans and lightsthroughout, adding materially to the com-fort of passengers during the heated season. 20 ELECTRIC FANS, AN ADJUNCT TO COMFORTABLE TRAVEL. Each of the exquisite Pullman parlorcars is provided with high speed fans inthe parlors and drawing rooms, keeping theair fresh and cool on the hottest days. Theobservation and dining cars are particularlyinviting. Luxurious comfort of passengers is theessential feature of the Royal Limited, with no extra fare other than the regularPullman charge. Dinner is served table dhote.The announcement is simple but effect-ive, and the traveler who is earnestly de-sirous of providing comfort for himselfwould find it on the Royal Limitedtr.iins.

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Image from page 58 of “Glimpses of medical Europe” (1908)
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Identifier: glimpsesofmedica00thom
Title: Glimpses of medical Europe
Year: 1908 (1900s)
Authors: Thompson, Ralph L. (Ralph Leroy), 1872-
Subjects: Medicine Medicine Education, Medical Travel
Publisher: Philadelphia, London, J.B. Lippincott company
Contributing Library: Columbia University Libraries
Digitizing Sponsor: Open Knowledge Commons

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Botany and turn the laughon Professor Rosen. While Linnaeus was able to make hisdepartment in the University of Sweden themost famous in the world, and to keep foreignnations and learned societies busy in con-ferring medals and degrees upon him, he wasnever able to classify his own little homeherbarium. His wife was reported to be givento frivolity and dissipation, and, notwith-standing the fame of her husband, she wasfinally denied admission to the Court. Thefive children of these two incompatibles wentfor the most part the way of the mother,although one daughter made some importantexperiments in plant life, and a son, whonever did anything out of the ordinary, suc-ceeded Linnaeus at the University. 50 UPSALA Linnaeus was apparently a man who shouldnot have married, for he did not have thehappy faculty of mixing emotion with intel-lect, and it was undoubtedly his neglect ofhis wife that caused her to seek companion-ship in those whose knowledge was lesscryptogamous than her husbands.

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House of Linn^.us We found the medical department of theUniversity of great interest. There are abouta hundred and sixty students of medicine here,and their needs are amply provided for. It isinteresting to compare some points in the med-ical training here with those at home. Take,for instance, the course in pathology. Thestudent here has pathology rubbed into him 51 MEDICAL EUROPE for three years, and he can get more if hewishes. There is a large building devotedwholly to pathology. It contains lecture-rooms, museum, post-mortem room, and nu-merous rooms for individual research. Thereare two professorships in this subject. UlrikQuensel, wdio is chief of the department, is apleasant man to meet. He has a pleasingsmile and a nice little way of throwing backhis head when he laughs, which he does fre-quently. All the time he was showing usabout he held tenaciously to the butt of asmall cigar. There was perhaps two centi-metres of it in all. Occasionally he wouldmanage to get the end of i

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Image from page 346 of “The Street railway journal” (1884)
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Identifier: streetrailwayjo281906newy
Title: The Street railway journal
Year: 1884 (1880s)
Authors:
Subjects: Street-railroads Electric railroads Transportation
Publisher: New York : McGraw Pub. Co.
Contributing Library: Smithsonian Libraries
Digitizing Sponsor: Smithsonian Libraries

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ONE OF THE .500-KW, D. C. TURBO-GENERATORS IN POWERSTATION NO. 2 the same. This indicates that the brakes do not release well,and also indicates a continuous friction which consumesenergy that should be more usefully applied to the operationof the equipment. SCHEDULES AND FARES At present a half-hour schedule is given on the WestChester line between West Chester and Sixty-Third Street. CONSTRUCTION CAR, PHILADELPHIA S.TRACTION COMPANY WEST CHESTER

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STANDARD INTERURBAN CAR WITH STEEL UNDERFRAME Ol-& WEST CHESTER TRACTION COMPANY A 15-minute schedule is given on the Ardmore line fromSixty-Third Street to Ardmore. A 15-minute schedule is givenon the Clifton line from Sixty-Third Street to Collindale. Theservice is given with single-car units. As soon as the elevatedtrains are placed in operation it is proposed to give thesesame schedules, but it is believed that at certain hours of theday, at least, it will be necessary to run two and three-car The fares are based on the zone system, and a separate 5-cent fare is collected from each passenger at each zone. For watching the efficiency of the schedules, the record,shown on the opposite page, is kept. On this is entered thenumber of passengers carried on each trip, in each fare zone,and as the seating capacity of the cars is known, it becomesa simple matter to determine if the cars are properly servingthe travel at each hour of the day.In this sheet the number of pas-sengers is en

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Image from page 144 of “Illustrated catalogue and general description of improved machine tools for working metal” (1899)
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Identifier: illustratedcatal00sell
Title: Illustrated catalogue and general description of improved machine tools for working metal
Year: 1899 (1890s)
Authors: Sellers, William, & co. [from old catalog]
Subjects: Machine-tools Machinery
Publisher: Philadephia, Levytype company
Contributing Library: The Library of Congress
Digitizing Sponsor: The Library of Congress

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and supported by an ex-tended bearing which is as large as the head itself, and relieves the spindle ofbending strain. The saddle carrying this cutter-head is 54 long, and is gibbedto place with large brass shoes. Cutter-head is driven by belt without u.se oflong shafts and sliding keys. The power feed is adjustable, and varies from iper revolution of the cutter-head to 4. Rapid power traverse is arranged formoving head quickly to place, and the two levers operating the feeding and trav-ersing mechanism are interlocked to prevent both being thrown in at the sametime. The table shown in the plate is 8 ft. long by 36 wide, and is adjustableto and from the cutter-head to regulate the amount of feed. Fast and loose pul-leys on countershaft are 24 diameter for 4 belt, and should make 260 revolu-tions per minute. N. B.—These machines are made with various leiigths of travel and differentarrangements for supporting ivork. Sellers & Co., Incorporated, Philadelphia, Pa. 39 Plate No. 114.

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ROTARY PI.ANER FOR ARMOR PLATES. The cutter-head having 75 tools, arranged in circle 50 diameter, will planework 26 ft. long, carried upon two tables, each 8 ft. long by 7 ft. 6 wide.These tables are adjustable to and from the cutter-head by power to regulatedepth of cut ; the head is provided with power traverse at the rate of 20 ft. perminute for adjustment and variable friction feed. Power is conve^ed to head bybelts without use of long shafts and sliding bearings. Machine complete withcountershaft, wrenches, and sample set of cutters. Fast and loose pulleys oncountershaft 24 by 5^2 face, and should make 400 revolutions per minute. Note.—The cutter-head and saddle of this machine were designed to meeta demand for a more powerful and more rigid tool than any in the market, andspecial attention was paid to strength of parts and arrangement and size of bear-ings. IVe make this machine ivith 7arious foiDis of table and fo> bridge-7Cork,arrange it to sivivel. 140 Wm. Sellers &

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Image from page 306 of “Rambles in the path of the steam-horse. An off-hand olla podrida, embracing a general historical and descriptive view of the scenery, agricultural and mineral resources, and prominent features of the travelled route from Baltimore
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Identifier: ramblesinpathofs00bowe
Title: Rambles in the path of the steam-horse. An off-hand olla podrida, embracing a general historical and descriptive view of the scenery, agricultural and mineral resources, and prominent features of the travelled route from Baltimore to Harper’s Ferry, Cumberland, Wheeling, Cincinnati, and Louisville
Year: 1855 (1850s)
Authors: Bowen, Eli, b. 1824
Subjects: Baltimore and Ohio Railroad Company
Publisher: Philadelphia, W. Bromwell and W. W. Smith Baltimore, S. B. Hickcox, agent
Contributing Library: West Virginia University Libraries
Digitizing Sponsor: Lyrasis Members and Sloan Foundation

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f Cumberland Coal.—Coking. Professor Johnson, in the experiments alluded to, and vrhich haveserved more definitely to fix the standard of American coals than anyprevious examinations or analyses, procured specimens of the chiefBritish American coals, as well as several specimens of bituminous andsemi-bituminous coals from England. The results flowing from the comparison of these, when subjected tothe same tests as those of the coals of the United States, and which arepublished in detail in his valuable report, show that in steam generatingand vietallurgic properties they all fall below the standard of the Cum-berland coal. ]Mr. Mushet, whose authority on coal is held in the highestestimation in England, thus speaks of the Cumberland coal analysedby him :— The specimen of coal sent is the very best bitunnnous coal Iever saw. I should consider it well adapted to iron-making. It containsand will form, as much weight of coke from a given quantity, as the bestSouth Wales furnace coals.

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Making Coke at Irostburg. Coke is fabricated by subjecting coal to the roasting process, in closeretorts, or in heaps in the open air, by the aid of which process itsvolatile properties are driven off, while its carbon remains. The magni-tude of the coal in this operation is increased, but its density is dimin-ished. In the experiments of Professor Johnson, eoal from the big veingave, by slow diking, seventy-eight per cent, of coke, and by rapid 290 RAMBLES IN THE PATH OF THE STEAM HORSE. Coking Coal. application of heat, seventy-two per cent. This vein, it is well known,is not very bituminous. A considerable quantity of coke is made at themines near Frostburg, as well as at Mount Savage, for consumption atthe iron works. The mode of coking is very similar to that of charingwood, being in heaps, in the open air. For the purpose of coking inheaps, a level spot is selected, a temporai-y chimney of brick is erected,with alternate holes, some of which are necessary at the base. Aroundthis

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Image from page 31 of “Glimpses of medical Europe” (1908)
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Identifier: glimpsesofmedica00thom
Title: Glimpses of medical Europe
Year: 1908 (1900s)
Authors: Thompson, Ralph L. (Ralph Leroy), 1872-
Subjects: Medicine Medicine Education, Medical Travel
Publisher: Philadelphia, London, J.B. Lippincott company
Contributing Library: Columbia University Libraries
Digitizing Sponsor: Open Knowledge Commons

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Image from page 431 of “Book of the Royal blue” (1897)
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Identifier: bookofroyalblue22balt
Title: Book of the Royal blue
Year: 1897 (1890s)
Authors: Baltimore and Ohio railroad company. [from old catalog]
Subjects: Middle Atlantic States — Description and travel
Publisher: Baltimore
Contributing Library: The Library of Congress
Digitizing Sponsor: Sloan Foundation

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Observation Cars between Baltimore and pittsburgBaltimore and Cincinnati *&» *?» Over Different Routes-ttlcat of Cumberland^ ^be picturesque Route of Hmerica The Book of the Royal Blue for October will be a Hunting andFishing Number. Send eight (8) cents in stamps for copy after September 25. Royal Blue trains

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JVew York • Philadelphia • Baltimore Washington • pittsburg ■ Cincinnati • St- Louis • Chicago •

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Image from page 106 of “From trail to railway through the Appalachians” (1907)
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Identifier: fromtrailtorailw00brigh
Title: From trail to railway through the Appalachians
Year: 1907 (1900s)
Authors: Brigham, Albert Perry, 1855-1932
Subjects: Atlantic States — Description and travel Ohio River Valley — Description and travel
Publisher: Boston, New York [etc.] Ginn & Company
Contributing Library: The Library of Congress
Digitizing Sponsor: Sloan Foundation

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tomac which ships can-not pass. The Potomac runs so close to Chesapeakebay that it is only forty miles from Washington acrossto Baltimore. Chesapeake bay is much like Delaware bay and thetidal Hudson river, only it is larger than either. Balti-more is at a greater distance from the open sea thanPhiladelphia is, and Philadelphia is farther inland thanNew York, but each of these cities tried to get as muchof the western trade as it could. The natural way for the men of Baltimore and Alex-andria to go across to the west was up the Potomac 86 THE NATIONAL KOAU 87 river and through its passes in the mountains, l^utbefore they tried this they had settled much of the low,flat land along the Potomac and about the Chesapeakein Virginia and Maryland. This was often called tide-water country, because the beds of the rivers are belowsea level, and the streams are deep enough for boats ofsome size. When the land was first settled and the colonistsfound that they could go almost everywhere by boat,

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Fig. ;^2- Tollhouse West of Brownsville, Pennsylvania they paid small heed to making roads. They could visittheir neighbors on other plantations and they could loadtheir tobacco and take it to market by the rivers. Manyplantations were beside rivers of such great depth thatsailing vessels bound for London could come up to thefarmers wharf and get his crop of tobacco. In early days the members of the legislature were notalways given so much per mile to pay the stage faresbetween their homes and the capital, but they were 88 FROM TRAIL TO RAILWAY allowed the cost of hiring boats instead. Many ferrieswere needed, and laws about them were made beforerules were laid down for bridges and roads. Severallawmakers at one time would have been fined for theirabsence from the legislature of the colony had they notbeen excused because there was no ferry to carry themover the river which they would have had to cross. Around Annapolis rolling roads were made. Thesewere wide paths made as smooth as p

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Image from page 109 of “The old world : Palestine, Syria, and Asia Minor : travel, incident, description and history” (1869)
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Identifier: oldworldpalestin00free
Title: The old world : Palestine, Syria, and Asia Minor : travel, incident, description and history
Year: 1869 (1860s)
Authors: Freese, Jacob R., 1826-1885
Subjects: Personal Narratives Physicians
Publisher: Philadelphia : J.B. Lippincott & Co.
Contributing Library: Francis A. Countway Library of Medicine
Digitizing Sponsor: Open Knowledge Commons and Harvard Medical School

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mns,which were probably parts of the temple. Two of thesestand pretty close together, and the Moslems say thatonly those who can pass between these columns everreach heaven. We have considerable sport in trying theexperiment, and find that every one of our company cansqueeze through, except the old sheikh (our conductor),who, being very corpulent, will not try it. 92 The Old World—Palestine. But the part which interests us most is the immensesubterranean archways, underneath the surface of theground not now built upon. We have some difficulty ingetting down to these through a hole near the outer wall,but, once here, the view is grand and imposing—archafter arch, and passage-way after passage-way can be seenfor a great distance. That these were a part of the oldtemple we have no doubt whatever. The Golden Gateis also shown, but its identity is very questionable. Thus we finish our description of Jerusalem and itssurroundings, and to-morrow we shall start for the Jordanand Dead Sea.

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CHAPTER V. OFF FOR THE JORDAN AND DEAD SEA. T S everything ready for a start, Mohammed? 1 Ready, sir. Have you seen that the canteen and tents are properlypacked and well secured on the baggage mules, and arethey, too, ready to start? Everything is ready, sir. Then lead off for the Jordan by the way of Bethanyand Jericho. Mohammed is a faithful servant and a passably gooddragoman when he is in his right mind ; but he willdrink to excess when he gets in coffee-shops and amonghis fellow-dragomen, and only yesterday we were obligedto give him a severe horse-whipping, in front of our owntent, and in the presence of other dragomen and scoresof lookers-on, because, being drunk, he was insolent andrefused to obey us. It was something new in Syria to see a Howajji floghis own dragoman, and the lookers-on seemed astoundedand paralyzed at the sight, but it taught him and them alesson which they will not soon forget, viz. : that anAmerican traveler will not take insolence nor suffer dis-obedienc

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Image from page 361 of “Bird lore” (1899)
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Identifier: birdlore131911nati
Title: Bird lore
Year: 1899 (1890s)
Authors: National Committee of the Audubon Societies of America National Association of Audubon Societies for the Protection of Wild Birds and Animals National Audubon Society
Subjects: Birds Birds Ornithology
Publisher: New York City : Macmillan Co.
Contributing Library: Smithsonian Libraries
Digitizing Sponsor: Biodiversity Heritage Library

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S The Warblers of North America Full biographies of our most beautiful, most abundant, and least-known birds. In describing these dainty, fascinating sprites of thetree-tops Mr. Chapman has here drawn on his own great wealth ofmaterial and has had the cooperation of many other ornithologists.Illustrated with colored plates of every species, by Fuertcs andHorsfall, and by photographs of nests and eggs. Bids fair to remain an authority for a long time.-—The Nation. Imperial 8vo. Cloth, .00 net D. APPLETON & COMPANY, PUBLISHERS29-35 W. 32d St., New York City J. HORACE MCFa No one can read this book without feeling a closer touch offriendship with the forms of bird-life about him.—A^^ou York Times Camps and Cruises OF AN Ornithologist The record of Mr. Chapmans experiences during theeight years in which he was gathering material for the now-famous habitat groups of birds at the American Museumof Natural History. Emphatically themost noteworthy oflate bird books. — The Oologist

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A notable contri-bution to bird-lore.— The Dial It is hardly possible to exaggerate the attraction which thisvolume of adventure and travel, by an ornithologist superbly equippedfor his work, must have for the hrdi-ovex.^—Philadelphia Press. By Frank M. Chapman Curator of Ornithology of the AmericanMuseum of Natural History JVith 2^0 Photographs from Nature hy the Author.8vo. cloth, gilt top, uncut edges. In a box, -00 net. Published by D. APPLETON & COMPANY, 29 W. 32nd St., New York

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Image from page 206 of “The Daily union history of Atlantic City and County, New Jersey : containing sketches of the past and present of Atlantic City and County” (1900)
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Identifier: dailyunionhistor00inhall
Title: The Daily union history of Atlantic City and County, New Jersey : containing sketches of the past and present of Atlantic City and County
Year: 1900 (1900s)
Authors: Hall, John F., fl. 1899-1900. cn
Subjects:
Publisher: Atlantic City, N.J. : Daily Union Printing Co.
Contributing Library: Allen County Public Library Genealogy Center
Digitizing Sponsor: Allen County Public Library Genealogy Center

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ide undermined and wrecked the building before it was finished, and the lotwhich cost ,000, in 1877, was sold fifteen years later for ,000. It has sincebeen sold for ,000. and is probably valued at twice that sum now. The company met with reverses and passed into the hands of Charles R. Col-well, as Receiver, July 12, 1878. One year later it went into the hands of WilliamH. Gatzmer and G. B. Linderman, trustees for the mortgage bondholders. In September, 1883, the road was sold in foreclosure proceedings to GeorgeR. Kearcher for the Philadelphia and Reading Railroad Company, which hassince operated it. It was made a standard gauge, double-track line and giventhe finest roadbed and rolling stock. It has maintained its popularity and eachyear increased its business. While not the financial success at first that its projectors anticipated, theNarrow Gauge enterprise popularized travel to the seashore and gave AtlanticCity an impetus of ])ri)S]ierity that has continued ever since.

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THE FIRST BOARDWALK. ^be TKHest 3er9ev> IRailroab. <tt^OR twenty-three years. 1854 to 1877, Atlantic City had but one sinj^le trackJ* railroad connecting with the outside world. That railroad had cost nearlydouble the estimated amount and had ruined, financially, all of its originalincorporators except Gen. Enoch Doughty, of Abscccin. and he was a li)scr inthe sum of fifty thousand dollars. Fortunately, the Canulen and Atlantic LandCompany pledged its valuable holdings to secure the notes and obligations of therailroad, so as to continue its operation and sustain the enterprise. When the Narrow Gauge was built, in 1877,the permanent population of Atlantic City wasabout 3,000. The reduction of fifty per cent, in thetarifif schedule, increased number of trains andquicker time, resulted in a general rush to the sea-shore. Hotels and boarding houses were too fewand too small for the demands upon them. is-itors, at times, walked the streets all night or sleptin chairs on porches or

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28_second_attempt_actually_at_Dam_No_4
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C&O Canal – A Tenuous Pawn (2) With Author Timothy R. Snyder by Jim Surkamp
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C&O Canal – A Tenuous Pawn (2) With Author Timothy R. Snyder by Jim Surkamp
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Made possible with the generous support of American Public University System, providing an affordable, quality, online education. The video and post do not reflect any modern-day policies or positions of American Public University System, and their content is intended to encourage discussion and better understanding of the past. More . . . apus.edu

1_Burning_Boats_Timothy_Snyder_FINAL

The Burning Boats 1861-1865 Pt. 2 With Author Timothy R. Snyder

2_We_Learn

We learn that upwards of one hundred boats lying at Williamsport and other points below and above, which have been prevented from passing down with their freight by the rebel troops at Harper’s Ferry; consequently all business upon the Canal has been suspended, and thousands directly and indirectly interested in its trade and commerce thrown out of employment. – Herald Torch Light, June 5, 1861.

3_In_Late_May_1861_jpg

In late May, 1861, Thomas Jonathan Jackson was replaced in command of Harper’s Ferry by Joseph E. Johnston. Confederates probably wanted a calmer head, an older man, a wiser man. Jackson had engaged in a bunch of provocative acts at a time when the Confederates were trying to woo Maryland to their cause. Ironically, just as Johnston took command, just a week earlier or so, the Maryland General Assembly adjourned. They took no steps towards secession, and then Union troops invaded northern Virginia, opposite Washington, D.C. on May 28th, occupying Alexandria, Arlington – the high ground opposite Washington, D.C. As a result, Johnston will have a free reign. It’s evident a shooting war is on. Maryland was taking no immediate steps towards secession. So Johnston then would take steps to destroy both the B and O railroad and the C&O canal, prior to his evacuating Harper’s Ferry. His troops attack the canal opposite Harper’s Ferry and burned over twenty-five canal boats and damaged a couple of locks. He also sent parties out to attempt to breach Dams No. 4 and 5 near Williamsport. They were unsuccessful, but these were first attempts to attack those dams.

4_Information_reached_here

Information reached here that an attempt was made by the Virginia rebels, on Saturday (June 9) and Sunday (June 10) nights last, to destroy Dams No. 4 and 5 on the Chesapeake and Ohio Canal. At No. 5 they were met by the brave Guards of Clear Spring, who, after considerable skirmishing, succeeded in repulsing them, killing one of their men. The rebels endeavored to blow up the dam by means of a blast, for which purpose they had procured four kegs of powder, but were driven off before they were able to injure it. At Dam No. 4 some damage was done to the Canal, but we learn none to the Dam itself. It is clearly the duty of every loyal citizen in the county to rally to the defence and protection of the property of the Canal Company. – The Herald of Freedom and Torch Light, June 12, 1861.

5_During_that_attack_on_the_dams

During that attack on the Dams, Redmond Burke, an Irishman who later became a bushwhacker and courier for Confederate Gen. J.E.B. Stuart and was killed in 1862 by Federal troops in Shepherdstown – he was every night, using a dark lantern was visiting Dam No. 4 with two of his sons and they worked at drilling for dynamite holes in the rockbed beneath the Dam, a Dam he once built with others. – Philadelphia Public Ledger June 14, 1861. Most people are more aware of Jackson’s later attempts to disable the dams in December of 1861. After the Confederates evacuated, canal traffic was resumed in late August, 1861. They did try to harass canal traffic.

6_Turner_Ashby_the_Confederate_cavalryman

In fact, Turner Ashby, the Confederate cavalryman, rode to Richmond, offering to lead an expedition to break the canal. And a staff officer in Richmond wrote that it as "a cherished object” of the Confederate government for the B andO railroad and the C&O canal both to have been severed or disabled. Monday-Wednesday – September 9-11, 1861: Shepherdstown/Bridgeport Lock No. 38.

7_Harry_Gilmore_wrote_while_encamped

Confederaate cavalryman Harry Gilmore wrote: While encamped near Morgan’s Spring, parties, of which I was generally one, would be sent frequently to the Potomac for the purpose of blockading the canal on the Maryland side, by which immense supplies of coal and provisions were brought to the capital. We would go down before daylight, conceal ourselves behind rocks or trees, or in some small building, and, when the sun was up, not a soldier or boat could pass without our taking a crack at them, and generally with effect, for we were all good shots. We became a perfect pest to them, and many an effort was made in vain to dislodge us; but wo could not be found, for every day we were in a new spot, miles apart. Friday-Sunday – September 13-15, 1861: Shepherdstown, Va.

8_A_Brisk_Skirmish

A Brisk Skirmish — We learn that a spirited skirmish took place on Friday last (Sept. 13), between the rebels at Shepherdstown, and the Federal troops stationed opposite the town on the Maryland side. The troops fired at each other across the river first with small arms, and then with cannon. When the rebels commenced firing with a cannon, our troops procured two old six pounders from Sharpsburg, and planted them on the borders of the river, and returned the fire with vigor, sending balls and other missiles into the town, which soon put the enemy to flight, and terminated the engagement. On our side a tow boy on the canal was killed, but none of the troops were hurt; on theirs it is believed that several were killed and wounded. – The Herald of Freedom and Torch Light, September 18, 1861.

9_Major_Parker_Gould

Major J. Parker Gould of the 13th Massachusetts in Sharpsburg wrote: There was a skirmish yesterday at Shepherdstown between the rebels and our troops. A canal-boat was passing at the time and 1 boatman was mortally wounded. The Confederates seem to know our weakness in numbers, and are becoming saucy.

10_There_was_serious_flood

There was a serious flood in November that put the canal out of commission; but in December, canal boats began to move again toward Cumberland. Reports were coming that eighty-seven boats had cleared Cumberland and carried 7,613 tons of coal, 633 tons of lumber, cord wood, cooperage, eighty tons of hay and oats –

11_Sandy_Hook_where_at_least_half_load

all heading to Harpers Ferry and Sandy Hook where at least half of that overall load would be loaded on eastbound Baltimore and Ohio cars. And those emptied cars would be heading back up to Cumberland imminently.

12_Stonewall_Jackson_by_this_time_his_name

"Stonewall" Jackson, by this time his name is "Stonewall," (he earned that name at First Manassas, First Bull Run), by this time his headquarters was at Winchester and he sent a number of expeditions to the north to disable Dam No. 5 and wanted to disable Dam No. 4. While the destruction of both dams was important to the Confederates,

13_Dam_No_5_was_Jacksons_first_choice

Dam No. 5 was Jackson’s first choice. Why? Both dams were built logged-cribbed and rock-filled in the 1830s. Dam No. 4’s leakiness had been fixed with new masonry by the spring of 1861. But Dam No. 5 was, not only still leaking and prone to sabotage, but it was just that much

14_further_up_river_away_from_Gen_Banks

further up river away from Federal General Banks’ men further east in Frederick, Maryland. Friday – December 6, 1861: Dam No. 5. Saturday-Monday – December 7-9, 1861: Dam No. 5. The first one was in the first week of December against Dam No. 5. It was led by Turner Ashby, All of them were a failure.

15_The_Union_troops_were_strongly_posted

The Union troops were strongly posted and, of course, they had the icy Potomac River between them. Working conditions were difficult. The Confederates tried to divert water around the Virginia end of the dam. They also tried to cut the wooden cribbing of the dam on the Virginia side of the dam. But the strongly posted Union sharpshooters prevented them from inflicting any damage. Saturday-Sunday – December 7 thru -8 – Federal

16_Col_Samuel_Leonard_turns_the_tables

Col. Samuel Leonard Turns the Tables: Confederate Major Elisha Franklin Paxton of the 27th Va., who arrived at Dam No. 5 on the Virginia side near dusk that Saturday, December 7th, seemed to have his work of dam destruction well under control. With arms fire for cover, for 5 hours his men worked at destroying the Dam in the ice cold water. Col. Samuel Leonard of the 13th Massachusetts saw that his men, armed with short-range smoothbores at Dam No. 5 couldn’t withstand the onslaught from Confederate Rockbridge Artillery Captain William McLaughlin’s six gun battery and the fire of 600 better armed regulars firing from the Virginia side. So Col. Leonard gave new orders, using the nighttime to change things. He replaced the company with another company from Williamsport that had much better Enfield rifled muskets. Leonard switched two companies sending the C company with shorter-range smoothbore rifles from Dam No. 5 to No. 4 and replacing them with Company G at the besieged Dam No. 5. William McLaughlin’s Rockbridge Artillery began early the next morning – Sunday, December 8th – this time, firing boldly right from the brink of the river. But they became surprised to face a barrage of fire that was much more lethal than the day before. They were driven back and after dark they snuck back to retrieve their pieces.

17_Confederate_Paxton_wrote_later

Confederate Paxton, supervising the assault, wrote later: At daybreak Sunday morning our cannon opened fire upon them again, but they were so sheltered in the canal from which in the meantime they had drawn off the water that it was found impossible to dislodge them. As my workmen could not be protected against the enemy’s fire, I found it necessary to abandon the enterprise.

19_Charles_E_Davis_remembered

Charles E. Davis of the 13th Massachusetts remembered the vast difference bertween the Enfield rifled muskets and the smoothbores: Prior to our arrival, this part of the river was protected by troops supplied with the old smooth-bore musket of a very antiquated pattern, with too little power to carry a bullet across the river, so that they were a

20_constant_source_of_ridicule_by_the_enemy

constant source of ridicule by the enemy, who were much better armed, and who amused themselves by coming down to the river daily, and placing the thumb of the right hand to the nose, and the thumb of the left hand to the little finger of the right hand,

21_would_make_rapid_motions_with_the_fingers

would make rapid motions with the fingers, to the great exasperation of the Union men, who were powerless to prevent it. After we were placed there with our Enfield rifles, there was less time spent in arranging their fingers, and more in the use of their feet. Late that Sunday, December 8th,

22_Harry_Gilmore_and_his_friend_Welch
Harry Gilmore and his friend, Welch, try to recover Confederate pieces near the shore.

23_the_enemy_were_all_concealed

The enemy were all concealed behind the rip-rap walls of the canal, and impossible to shell them out. Our men were prevented from limbering and carrying off our pieces by a very hot fire of musketry from the enemy on the other bank; and, when two or three men had been wounded, Colonel Ashby rode up, and told Captain McLaughlin that the guns must be brought away, and also the horses of a lieutenant and sergeant tied near them; but not a man of the battery would volunteer to go after them. I proposed to Welch that we should procure the horses. He agreed, and, without saying a word to anyone, we tied our horses behind the cliff; and crawled to within two hundred yards of the horses and guns, when the enemy opened on us a brisk fire from the canal. Without stopping, we made a dash for the horses, and never probably before were halters unloosed in so short a time. This done, we leaped on them and fled, lying flat on their necks.

24_The_leaden_hail_was_all_around_us

The leaden hail was all around us, but we soon got out of range, and, vaulting on our own, we led the recovered horses back, very much to the amusement of the colonel and the chagrin of the lieutenant and sergeant, when we said, "Gentlemen, here are your horses. Don’t get them into such a tight place again." Welch and I then offered to take our company and bring off the guns; but Captain McLaughlin would not consent, bringing them away himself after night. Soon after Welch and I had recovered the horses, I was lying down in a field, under cover of a knoll, my horse browsing in the bottom, when Colonel Ashby came and informed me that Captain Moore, of the 2d Virginia Infantry, was in a very precarious position in a large mill, and he wished me to take a message to him, which must be done on foot. I took the message and started on this dangerous mission, being obliged, for five hundred yards, to cross in full view of the enemy on the other side of the river. Of course I was in a great hurry to accomplish my task; and, as soon as I got within range of their muskets, I started at full speed across the flat, the balls flying around, and cutting up the sod in a lively manner. Three or four times I halted, and found refuge behind piles of friendly rocks or trees to take breath. At last I reached the mill in safety, and delivered the message, I returned in greater fear than ever, lest I might receive a wound in the back , a soldier’s dread; but I reported all safe to Colonel Ashby, and was fully repaid, by his kind thanks and complimentary speeches.

25_the_storm_that_night_was_terrific
The storm that night was terrific, and the men suffered awfully from cold. One of our

26_officer_had_a_flagon_of_whiskey

officers had a flagon of whisky, and, under the pressing necessities of the case, I stole it from his ambulance and divided it among the field officers. Next morning the officer was in a towering rage about it. A Confederate team crept down to the dam,

27_gathered_at_its_southern_abutment

gathered at its southern abutment with the idea of digging a ditch around the southern end of the dam, so the flowing water would undermine the dam, causing it to collapse. The dam didn’t collapse because the water level dropped quickly after their work, reducing the diverted stream to a trickle.

28_second_attempt_actually_at_Dam_No_4

During the second attempt, it was actually at Dam No. 4, again led by Ashby during the second week of December, it was a failure as well. Wednesday – December 11, 1861: Dam No. 4 (north of Shepherdstown, Va.} Initially the Confederates were spied opposite Dam No. 4. They disappeared. The 12th Indiana, who was on duty there at Dam No. 4, sent a party of men across to see if the Confederates had,indeed, left. They were captured, as the most significant thing that occurred there. That precipitated a sharp exchange, but no damage was done to the canal.

29_The_third_attempt_was_the_one_Jackson_attended

The third attempt was the one that Jackson attended in person. It was during the third week of December for about five days. The Confederates were opposite, arrayed from Falling Waters to Little Georgetown. They made threats and demonstrations as if they were going to cross the river at Falling Waters, where their main intention was to try to breach Dam No. 5.

30_Confederate_Captain_Raleigh_T_Colston

Tuesday – Dec. 17 – Confederate Captain Raleigh T. Colston of Berkeley County led a team onto Dam No. 5

31_after_dark
after dark, and through the night hacked away at

32_log_cribbing
the log cribbing in the middle of the dam.

33_rubble_held_by_the_log_cribs

The rubble held by the log cribs was piled up on the dam so that by morning of the 18th the piled rubble atop the still-standing dam was a breastworks shielding them from Federals gunfire. At daybreak the Federals discovered the breastworks.

34_Massachusetts_soldiers_went_down_the_river

Massachusetts soldiers went down river and found a location from which they could bring fire upon the workers and soon drove the southerners from the dam and into the millhouse. For cover Charlestown-born

35_artillerist_Roger_Preston_Chew

artillerist Roger Preston Chew’s two artillery pieces had been shelling a brick house on the Maryland side, where the shooting was coming from. But on December 19th, Wednesday,

36_Battery_E_1st_Pennsylvania_Artillery

Battery E of the 1st Pennsylvania Artillery answered with two ten pound parrotts forcing Chew to take cover fifty yards to their right.

37_William_T_Poague

Lt. William Thomas Poague of the Confederate Rockbridge Artillery remembered seeing Chew and others shrunk behind a large tree with shells flying by, to the left and to the right. Finally, on the last day, I think it was December 20th, the last day of the expedition, Jackson, in the words of one of his officers, "Yankee’d the Yankees," meaning that he had tricked them. He had boats made to potentially cross the river in a full view of the Union troops at Dam No. 5. He sent them up river toward Little Georgetown. The Union troops were sure that he was going to cross there. Threats had been made the previous day. So they all followed and apparently left the work party with an evening to work on the dam without being fired upon. They heard timber breaking and soon the dam had been breached and (they) left. The very next day the Union Gen. Banks reports that canal

38_boats_still_traveling_in_both_directions

boats are still traveling in both directions. Jackson sent one more, small expedition back to Dam No. 5. They spent two nights at the dam – January 1st and January 2nd; and one of their men in charge there wrote that they spent two additional nights widening the breach.

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Image from page 208 of “Technology of textile design. Being a practical treatise on the construction and application of weaves for all textile fabrics, with minute reference to the latest inventions for weaving. Containing also an appendix showing the ana
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Image by Internet Archive Book Images
Identifier: technologyoftext1889poss2
Title: Technology of textile design. Being a practical treatise on the construction and application of weaves for all textile fabrics, with minute reference to the latest inventions for weaving. Containing also an appendix showing the analysis and giving the calculations necessary for the manufacture of the various textile fabrics
Year: 1889 (1880s)
Authors: Posselt, E. A. (Emanuel Anthony), 1858-1921
Subjects: Textile fabrics
Publisher: Philadelphia, Pub. by the author [etc.] London, S. Low, Marston, Searle & Rivington, limited
Contributing Library: Sterling and Francine Clark Art Institute Library
Digitizing Sponsor: Sterling and Francine Clark Art Institute Library

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Fig. 871. Fig. 872. opposite directions, to pull the carriage backward and forward transversely along the groovedguide-plate or race of the loom. A similar set of cords and a knife-carriage are provided foreach side of the loom, both knife-carriages moving in the same guide-plate alternately, each onlyabout half the distance across, and each alternating in its lateral travel from side to centre of therace-plate. Transversely across the frame of the loom are arranged two bars or rails, R and 5, theirrelative positions being as shown in Fig. 869, the former being merely a bar or rail supporting 204 the double pile fabric while it is being severed in two through the pile by the laterally-movingcutting-knives. Bar R is recessed near each of its ends (see Figs. 868 and 869) to admit of theinsertion and support therein of the housings for the sharpening-roUers, and so that the upper andlower sharpening-rollers shall come alternately in contact with the upper and lower sides, res-pectively,

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Image from page 172 of “Popular resorts, and how to reach them : combining a brief description of the principal summer retreats in the United States, and the routes of travel leading to them” (1875)
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Identifier: popularresortsho00bach
Title: Popular resorts, and how to reach them : combining a brief description of the principal summer retreats in the United States, and the routes of travel leading to them
Year: 1875 (1870s)
Authors: Bachelder, John B. (John Badger), 1825-1894
Subjects: Summer resorts
Publisher: Boston : John B. Bachelder
Contributing Library: University of Pittsburgh Library System
Digitizing Sponsor: Lyrasis Members and Sloan Foundation

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itor. The valleys are deep, the])recipices are bold and high, and the momitains steep. Even the watersrush with greater violence than in tamer countries. But the public will.soon understand this scenery better. The artists, the pioneers of pleas-ure travel, have already heard of it, and each year visit it in increasingnumbers. Soon the tide will set up this valley, hotels will be in demandto meet it. and the press will herald its praises. Persons residing in our large cities hardly realize how quickly and forhow small a sum these romantic places can be enjoyed. The morningtrain from New York or Philadelphia takes you to Mauch Chunk inseason for dinner, — dinner steaming hot at the Mansion House. The Switch-back and Glen Onoko can be visited in season to return atnight. l>»)l>lH-Ali KKSOUTS, AM) HOW H) IJKACII TIIIOM. 1.19 The subjoined description of the Nesoopec region is from LippincottsMagazine: — >• We walked about a half-mile along a wood-road, struck into a toot-

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PROSPECT ROCK.Nescopec Valley. path, andloll owed it a hun-dred yards or so,and without wam-ng walked ojit ona flat rock. fromwhich we could atfirst see nothingbut foq. u]). down,or around. It w^sa misty morning;but we made outto understand that we weremendous on theabyss; verge of a precipice, which fell sheer down into a tre-and when the fog lifted we looked out upon miles and 160 ^PILAR RESORTS. AXIl HOW TO liKACH THEM. miles of valleys, iiartly cleared, but principally covered with primevalforests. We were on Prospect Rock. Presently our guide took us by a romidabout way to Cloud Point.This is a commanding projection ou the other side of the glen; and herea still wider view — another, yet the same — lay before ns. There issomethiuti- indescribably oTand in the solitude of this sc-iif^. — forpsts

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Image from page 352 of “History of the counties of Dauphin and Lebanon : in the commonwealth of Pennsylvania ; biographical and genealogical” (1883)
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Identifier: historyofcountie00egle
Title: History of the counties of Dauphin and Lebanon : in the commonwealth of Pennsylvania ; biographical and genealogical
Year: 1883 (1880s)
Authors: Egle, William Henry, 1830-1901
Subjects:
Publisher: Philadelphia : Everts & Peck
Contributing Library: University of Pittsburgh Library System
Digitizing Sponsor: University of Pittsburgh Library System

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o-ope. There are many facts connected with the history ofinternal improvements in this locality which it willbe impossible within our prescribed limits to do littlemore than briefly refer to, and we shall present themas they occur to us in this connection. Very few per-sons have any idea of the difficulties of transporta-tion prior to the era of canals and railroads. Eighty-five or ninety years ago it was not an uncommonsight to see as many as five hundred pack-horses pass-ing the ferry here westward, loaded with merchan-dise, salt, iron, etc. The iron was carried on horse-back, being crooked over and around their bodies;barrels or kegs were hung on each side of these. Thepack-horses were generally led in divisions of twelveor fifteen horses, carrying about two hundred weighteach, going single file, and managed by two men, onegoing before as the leader, and the other in the rear,to see after the safety of the packs. Where the bridleroad passed along declivities or over hills, the path

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CITY OF HARRISBURG. 321 was in some places washed out so deep that the packsor burdens came in contact with the ground or otherimpeding obstacles, and were frequently displaced.However, as the carriers usually traveled in com-panies, the packs were soon adjusted, and no greatdelay occasioned. The pack-horses were generallyfurnished with bells, which were kept from ringingduring the day drive, but were loose at night, whenthe horses were set free, and permitted to feed andbrowse. The bells were intended as guides to directto their whereabouts in the morning. When thewagons were first introduced, the carriers consideredthat mode of transportation an invasion of theirrights. Their indignation was more excited, andthey manifested greater rancor than did the regularteamsters when the line of packets or railroad carscame into use about forty years afterwards. Fifty years ago the currency was eleven-penny-bits, fippenny-bits, and shillings,—eight shillings onedollar. Eight yards of calico

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Image from page 253 of “Book of the Royal blue” (1897)
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Identifier: bookofroyalblue24balt
Title: Book of the Royal blue
Year: 1897 (1890s)
Authors: Baltimore and Ohio railroad company. [from old catalog]
Subjects: Middle Atlantic States — Description and travel
Publisher: Baltimore
Contributing Library: The Library of Congress
Digitizing Sponsor: Sloan Foundation

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0.00 Weston, W. Va 9.05 West Alexander, Pa 10.00 West Newton, Pa 8.05 Wheeling, W.Va lO.OO Williamstown, W. Va. (via Parkers-burg) 10.75 No stop-overs will be permitted on going trip at any point en route. On tickets used to Baltimore, stop-over at Washington (without deposit of ticket) will be allowed on return trip, within final limit of ticket. Full details concerning time of trains, Pullman parlor and sleeping car accommodations, etc., will befurnished on application to ticket agents Baltimore & Ohio Railroad in above territory. Royal Blue Line PERSONALLY CONDUCTED TOURS TO WASHINGTON ALL EXPENSES INCLUDED 1910Seven=Day Tours from BOSTON April 8 and 22, May 6, 1910 from NEW YORK April 9 and 23 and May 7, 1910 Three=Day Tours .00 from NEIW YORK $ 9.00 from PHILADELPHIA $ 8.70 from CHE.STE,R $ 8.25 from WILMINGTON April 14 and 28, May 28,1910 Secure illustrated itineraries and Guide to Washington fromany Baltimore & Ohio ticket agent in above-named cities. mnraw®

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special Excursionsand Conventions—1910 Atlantic City, Cape May, Sea Isle City, Ocean City, N. J., OceanCity, Md., and Rehoboth Beach, Del. —East of the Ohio River,Special Low-Rate Excursions June 23d, July 7th and 21st, Aug^ust4th and i8th and September ist. Atlantic City—General Assembly Presbyterian Church in U. S. A.,May 18th to 31st.G. A. R. National Encampment, September igth to 24th. Baltimore, Md.—Southern Baptist Convention, May nth to 18th. Chicago, 111.—Knights Templar, Triennial Conclave, August 8th to 13th. Cincinnati, Ohio — General Federation Womens Clubs, May nthto 18th. New Orleans, La.—Ancient Arabic Order Nobles Mystic Shrine.Imperial Council, April 12th and 13th. Saratoga Springs, N. Y.—Baptist Young Peoples Union ofAmerica, International Convention, July 7th to loth. Washington, D. C—Worlds Sunday School Association, May19th to 26th. For full information as to rates, etc., apply at ticket offices Baltimore 6 Ohio Railroad Co.

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Image from page 302 of “A hunt on snow shoes” (1906)
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Identifier: huntonsnowshoes00elli
Title: A hunt on snow shoes
Year: 1906 (1900s)
Authors: Ellis, Edward Sylvester, 1840-1916 Prittie, Edwin J
Subjects: Children’s stories, Canadian
Publisher: Chicago, Philadelphia [etc.] The J. C. Winston Company
Contributing Library: New York Public Library
Digitizing Sponsor: MSN

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supposedIndian when he stood over the carcass of thedeer. The lad was given some fifteen minutes inwhich to scrutinize this party, and by the endof that time he had reached the important con-clusion that he had entered a den of rogues, whohad gathered an extraordinary amount ofplunder about them. Furthermore, while theyappeared to the outside world as Indians, theywere only white men disguised as such. This conclusion explained a number of thingswhich otherwise would not have been so readilyunderstood. The appearance of these men,hunting through the upper Maine forests, paint-ed and clothed as red-skins, and their brokenaccent when talking to strangers, were intendedto make it appear that they belonged to thePenobscot, or some other tribe of Indians nearlyextinct. Scarcely any one meeting them in thewilderness would have the least doubt uponthis point. But they were burglars and housebreakers,who had fixed upon this retreat as the one leastlikely to be disturbed by the minions of the

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He had entered a den of rogues. THE BULLS-EYE 291 law. With ordinary care it was hardly pos-sible—or at least probable—that their hiding-place would be suspected. Using the cavern under the falls as head-quarters, they raided through the lower coun-try, sometimes alone, or in couples, and quitefrequently in parties of three or four. These traveled pretty well to the southward,and no doubt had committed depredations inPortland, Bangor, Augusta and other widely-separated cities. In these places they ap-peared, so far a,s they were compelled to appear,in the guise of their own race and color, andthen, making a rapid retreat northward, andchanging themselves into noble red men, theirgeneral plan of operations will be understood. Clarence Landon had heard of this band atintervals during a year past, and indeed his ownhome had been once plundered by burglars,who, beyond a doubt, belonged to the sameparty. He knew, furthermore, that the civilauthorities in different portions of Maine had

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Image from page 417 of “Rambles in the path of the steam-horse. An off-hand olla podrida, embracing a general historical and descriptive view of the scenery, agricultural and mineral resources, and prominent features of the travelled route from Baltimore
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Identifier: ramblesinpathofs00bowe
Title: Rambles in the path of the steam-horse. An off-hand olla podrida, embracing a general historical and descriptive view of the scenery, agricultural and mineral resources, and prominent features of the travelled route from Baltimore to Harper’s Ferry, Cumberland, Wheeling, Cincinnati, and Louisville
Year: 1855 (1850s)
Authors: Bowen, Eli, b. 1824
Subjects: Baltimore and Ohio Railroad Company
Publisher: Philadelphia, W. Bromwell and W. W. Smith Baltimore, S. B. Hickcox, agent
Contributing Library: West Virginia University Libraries
Digitizing Sponsor: Lyrasis Members and Sloan Foundation

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ike the former, excluding all undergrowth, andpresenting a cool, grassy shade underneath. The gigantic sycamore is * It may be proper to remark that the time of which our venerable friend speaks,was considerably anterior to the steamboat; and that the navigation of the Ohio,at that early period, was a different affair from what it is now. The flat-boat hasgiven way to the palatial steamboat. 400 RAMBLES IN THE PATH OF THE STEAM HORSE. Lawrenceburg.—A rare combination. the most remarkable tree on the upper part of the Ohio. These wonder-ful productions of nature are, however fast disappearing before the axeof the settler, and in time, the plantations of groves and trees, whichmay be ranked among the proudest of her works, will only be known totradition, like the race of the giants. Lawrenceburg, two miles below the mouth of the Great Miami, andtwenty-two from Cincinnati, is the county seat for Dearborne, Indiana.It is a place of considerable trade, and gives promise of future import-

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ance. It is the terminus of the White Water canal, which penetratesthe interior of the State to Cambridge, seventy-six miles distant. Thecanal traverses one of the richest and most productive valleys in thewest; and passes through several populous towns, as Brookville, Con-nersville, Houston, Cambridge, &c. It is also the southern terminusof the Indianapolis railroad, from which place the capital of the State iseighty-eight miles distant. Population about five thousand. Near this place we have a scene of peculiar interest, and extremelyrare even in this age of improvement. Passing around a prominent bluff,the river rolls along in its serene beauty and brightness ; on its pebbledDank, we have the railway, the swift steam-horse being supported onhigh trestle-works ;—by the side of the railway, we have the canal, withthe faithful horse patiently tugging along his burthen; while higher up,overlooking all, is the turnpike road, over which the old stage coachgoes rumbling and jumbling

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Image from page 160 of “Illustrated catalogue and general description of improved machine tools for working metal” (1899)
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Identifier: illustratedcatal00sell
Title: Illustrated catalogue and general description of improved machine tools for working metal
Year: 1899 (1890s)
Authors: Sellers, William, & co. [from old catalog]
Subjects: Machine-tools Machinery
Publisher: Philadephia, Levytype company
Contributing Library: The Library of Congress
Digitizing Sponsor: The Library of Congress

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averse for saddles on cross rail. Adjustable feed also in both directions.Cross rail swivel, to suit tapers up to i^ per foot. Bed 42 ft. long. Travel ofheads on bed to suit frames 32 ft. long. Length of bed made to suit longer orshorter work if desired. Made also with three heads—and, if required, arrangedto drive by countershaft. We believe this to be the stiffest and strongest frameslotter yet built and at the same time the handie.st. Enlarged view of one head (shown in Plate No. 128, on opposite page).Width between uprights, 48. Total travel of saddle on cross rail, 54. Clearheight under cro.ss rail, 2334. Guided on one side only with brass taper shoes.Uprights connected by deep crossgirt independent of rail. Motor drive gives com-plete independence of heads in regard to speed and feed. Feed along bed variablefrom .014 to .17, and transversely from .006 to .102. Rapid travel controlledby friction clutches. Wm. Sellers & Co., Ixcorporated, Philadelphia, Pa. 155 Plate No. 128.

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[56 Wm. Sellers & Co., Incorporated, Philadelphia, Pa. Planing flachines. SINCE the introduction of our method of driving planer tables by a spiralpinion engaging with an inclined rack, our planing machines have become so well and favorably known that we do not feel it necessary to give at thistime an extended description of the details of their construction. We maysay, however, that we have kept these machines thoroughly up to date, makingfrom time to time such alterations as were demanded by modern practice. Ourplaning machines are of two kinds, those in which the driving belts are shifted toreverse the table, and those in which the reversal is accomplished by frictionclutches. The second type we call the Spiral geared planers, because a spiralpinion and spur wheel are used in place of the bevel wheel and pinion of the othertype ; both make use of our well known table-drive by spiral pinion and inclinedrack. Both use, also, our frictional escapement feed motion in which the reve

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