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Image from page 72 of “A trip to the Orient; the story of a Mediterranean cruise” (1907)

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Image from page 72 of “A trip to the Orient; the story of a Mediterranean cruise” (1907)
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Identifier: triptoorientstor00jacorich
Title: A trip to the Orient; the story of a Mediterranean cruise
Year: 1907 (1900s)
Authors: Jacob, Robert Urie
Subjects: Middle East — Description and travel
Publisher: Philadelphia, The J. C. Winston co
Contributing Library: University of California Libraries
Digitizing Sponsor: MSN

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roll, differing from ans^previously experienced by those on board. As a result,many of the passengers, not being able to adjust them-selves to this unfamiliar change of motion, becamesuddenly pale, and prudently retired to the privacy oftheir staterooms. But by the time the evening dinnerwas served the wind had somewhat subsided, and themajority of the passengers gathered in the saloon for an (60) THE CITY OF ALGIERS. 6i entertainment in the form of a roll-call of states. Thiswas presided over in a jolly manner by a prominentlawyer from Philadelphia. As he called the name of astate, some native of that state responded in a shortinformal address in which he praised his section of thecountry so highly that he made it appear to be a perfectEl Dorado. There was but time to hear from seventeenstates although representatives from almost every statein the Union and from Canada were present. When the sun rose on Wednesday morning our steamerwas anchored within the breakwater a short distance

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LIKE GHOSTS WALKING THROUGH THE STREETS. from the docks in the harbor of Algiers. A pleasantsight greeted our e^cs when we came on deck. We sawa little white boat gliding over the waves flying theAmerican flag, then two white steam launches speedingthrough the harbor with the same emblem floating in thebreeze, while, over to the left, we descried at anchorthree white gun boats, and hanging at their sterns ourcountrys flag. 62 A TRIP TO THE ORIENT. Three cheers for the Stars and Stripes, cried anenthusiast, and the hurrahs were given earnestly andvigorously. On the bulletin board we found the following noticeposted: PROGRAM FOR ALGIERS. The Managers will furnish landing tickets to the touristsbut all expenses while on shore in Algiers will be borne by eachindividual. Carriages will be waiting on the docks for those who desireto ride, at their own expense, and a guide will be assigned to gowith every four carriages. Meals may be obtained by returning to the ship, and pas-sengers are exp

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Image from page 141 of “Eight journeys abroad” (1917)
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Identifier: eightjourneysabr00rose
Title: Eight journeys abroad
Year: 1917 (1910s)
Authors: Rosengarten, Mary D. Richardson, 1846-1913 Rosengarten, Frank H
Subjects: Europe — Description and travel Algeria — Description and travel Palestine — Description and travel Egypt — Description and travel
Publisher: Philadelphia : printed for private circulation by J.B. Lippincott Co.
Contributing Library: Columbia University Libraries
Digitizing Sponsor: MSN

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have sent up guides to hunt him, but they were unsuc-cessful and they think he must have perished. What an awfulthing it is! Last evening we walked across about two miles to an oldruin called Inverlochy Castle. It is supposed to be a thousandyears old, or rather its origin is unknown. From its appear-ance w^e judged the materials must have all been broughtthere by hand, none of the stones being larger than a strongman could carry. We stayed there during the sunset and hada superb view of the surrounding mountains. Mother wentwith us but her foot is feeling sore this morning. I think sheuses it too much. We leave for Oban this evening and thenceto Fingals Cave to-morrow, so I will say good-bye for thistime. I am afraid you wont have patience to read it now. Your aff. sister, M. D. R. P. S. The children ought to trace out our route onthe map. The party all went yesterday to hear NormanMcLeod, except mother and myself. We were so sorry,father says he is the finest preacher he ever heard.

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SWEDEN, FINLAND AND RUSSIA Gotha Canal, Sweden, August 22nd. 1870. Last Tuesday morning we left the pier of Granton, theport of Edinburgh, in the steamer Scandinavia, bound forGothaborg, Sweden. The only lady on board, besides motherand myself, was from Dublin, and we three had the ladiescabin together. We were glad there were no more of us forwe were so dreadfully seasick that we could not have borneit at all if we had been obliged to stay in our close berths. Asit was we lay on our backs three nights and two days withoutbeing able to lift our heads. Im sure I never suffered so inmy life, even father and all the gentlemen were terribly sick.That German Ocean is an awfully rough customer. I canwell realize that the Swedes and Norwegians must have al-ways been capital sailors to follow such a sea. About forty-eight hours out we reached Christiansand, asmall town on the coast of Norway. The vessel stopped thereonly half an hour but we had time to land and take a look at thetown, so clea

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Image from page 31 of “A trip to the Orient; the story of a Mediterranean cruise” (1907)

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Identifier: triptoorientstor00jacorich
Title: A trip to the Orient; the story of a Mediterranean cruise
Year: 1907 (1900s)
Authors: Jacob, Robert Urie
Subjects: Middle East — Description and travel
Publisher: Philadelphia, The J. C. Winston co
Contributing Library: University of California Libraries
Digitizing Sponsor: MSN

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(19) 20 AfTRIP TO THE ORIENT. gorge penetrating from the ocean, and again a widepanorama of city, harbor, and ocean. Our return to the city was in a conveyance indeedunique. The descent of the mountain in sleds from the

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HK >IJ|)K l> 1() iMlLK.s IN LKXc.TH. FUNCHAL. 21 summit to the city below, through narrow lanes pavedwith small stones worn and slippery from years ofservice, was an experience long to be remembered.Our sled, without any means of propulsion but our ownweight, glided rapidly down the hill over the smoothsurface of the pavement like a toboggan on an icy slide.It was controlled by two men, who, sometimes runningalongside, sometimes clinging to the runners, regulatedthe speed and guided the sled around corners by meansof ropes attached to its sides. That was a wild and exciting ride, exclaimed oneof the ladies who had been tightly holding to her seatduring the descent. What is the distance from thesummit ? The slide is about two miles in length, lady, repliedone of the conductors. Dont take our picture now with our hair flyingwildly, exclaimed an occupant of a sled just arriving,to a friend with a camera. Your request comes too late, he answered. Ihave pressed the button. I hope i

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Image from page 62 of “A trip to the Orient; the story of a Mediterranean cruise” (1907)
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Identifier: triptoorientstor00jacorich
Title: A trip to the Orient; the story of a Mediterranean cruise
Year: 1907 (1900s)
Authors: Jacob, Robert Urie
Subjects: Middle East — Description and travel
Publisher: Philadelphia, The J. C. Winston co
Contributing Library: University of California Libraries
Digitizing Sponsor: MSN

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■m^- THE GENERALIFE OVERLOOKS THE ALHAMBRA. capture of the city, might, with the change of a word ortwo, still portray the visit of a party of modern tourists.The halls lately occupied by turbaned infidels,he writes, now rustled with stately dames and Christ-ian courtiers, who wandered with eager curiosity overthis far-famed palace, admiring its verdant courts andgushing fountains, its halls decorated with elegantarabesques, and storied with inscriptions, and thesplendor of its gilded and brilliantly painted ceilings.

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PROTECTED BY CITADELS AND WALLS.(51) 52 A TRIP TO THE ORIENT. Although the coloring is faded, and in many places theintricate ornamentation is crumbling or broken, sufficientremains to show how marvelously beautiful it musthave been in Moorish splendor. And beautiful it stillis, notwithstanding the ravages of time. While in the Court of Myrtles, some of the partyexamined the light, graceful arches and the stuccotapestry interwoven with flowers and leaves that adornthe galleries; others were more interested in the goldfish swimming in the transparent water of the longsunken tank in the center of the tiled court. In therichly ornamented Hall of the Ambassadors, the statereception room of the king, we waited while the guide,in answer to a request, interpreted some of the delicatehcarved inscriptions that fill every available space on thewall. One of these mottoes, said the guide, that isrepeated over and over again on almost every wall of thepalace, reads: There is no conqueror but Allah

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Image from page 409 of “Roosevelt’s African trip; the story of his life, the voyage from New York to Mombasa, and the route through the heart of Africa, including the big game and other ferocious animals, strange peoples and countries found in the course

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Image from page 409 of “Roosevelt’s African trip; the story of his life, the voyage from New York to Mombasa, and the route through the heart of Africa, including the big game and other ferocious animals, strange peoples and countries found in the course
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Identifier: rooseveltsafrica00ungerfr
Title: Roosevelt’s African trip; the story of his life, the voyage from New York to Mombasa, and the route through the heart of Africa, including the big game and other ferocious animals, strange peoples and countries found in the course of his travels
Year: 1909 (1900s)
Authors: Unger, Frederic William, b. 1875
Subjects: Roosevelt, Theodore, 1858-1919 Game and game-birds
Publisher: [Philadelphia?, PA.]
Contributing Library: Smithsonian Libraries
Digitizing Sponsor: Smithsonian Libraries

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ued by both, but that of the former will be evident from thedescription of the latter. A man without means forms an expedition, and borrows moneyfor this purpose at one hundred per cent, after this fashion. He agreesto repay the lender in ivory at one-half its market value. Having ob-tained the required sum, he hires several vessels and engages from onehundred to three hundred men, composed of Arabs and runaway vil-lains from distant countries, who have found an asylum from justicein the obscurity of Khartoum. He purchases guns and large quantitiesof ammunition for his men, together with a few hundred pounds of 373 374 SAMUEL BAKER AND THE SLAVE TRADE glass beads. The piratical expedition being complete, he pays his menfive months wages in advance, at the rate of forty-five piastres (nineshillings) per month, and he agrees to give them eighty piastres permonth for any period exceeding the five months advanced. His menreceive their advance partly in cash and partly in cotton stuffs for

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BAKERS ARRIVAL AT RIONGAS ISLAND clothes at an exorbitant price. Every man has a strip of paper, uponwhich is written, by the clerk of the expedition, the amount he ha§received both in goods and money, and this paper he must produce atthe final settlement. The vessels sail about December, and on arrival at the desiredlocality, the party disembark and proceed into the interior, until theyarrive at the village of some negro chief, with whom they establish an SIR SAMUEL BASER AND THE SLAVE TRADE 375 intimacy. Charmed with his new friends, the power of whose weap-ons he acknowledges, the negro chief does not neglect the opportunityof seeking their alliance to attack a hostile neighbor. Marchingthroughout the night, guided by their negro hosts, they bivouac withinan hours march of the unsuspecting village doomed to an attack abouthalf an hour before break of day. The time arrives, and, quietly sur-rounding the village while its occupants are still sleeping, they firethe grass huts in all

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Image from page 116 of “A trip to the Orient; the story of a Mediterranean cruise” (1907)
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Identifier: triptoorientstor00jacorich
Title: A trip to the Orient; the story of a Mediterranean cruise
Year: 1907 (1900s)
Authors: Jacob, Robert Urie
Subjects: Middle East — Description and travel
Publisher: Philadelphia, The J. C. Winston co
Contributing Library: University of California Libraries
Digitizing Sponsor: MSN

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iffs on three sides. Theonly approach to its summit, which is about two hundredfeet above the level of the modern city, is on the south-west side, being reached by the avenues we had followedup the gradual slope past Mars Hill. On this height, said the guide, the Athenians,during the reign of Pericles in the golden age of Greece,erected a temple to their patron deity, Minerva, thegoddess of wisdom. And to this goddess, named alsoAthena, who, as they asserted, sprang from the brainof Jupiter a mature woman in complete armor, theylooked for protection. For her they offered theirchoicest gifts, yet they did not neglect the multitude ofother gods whom they feared to offend. The old guide was well informed, but his Englishwas rather difficult to understand. He was inter-rupted a number of times until one of the tourists, acollege professor, undertook the task of assisting himin the story. ■These dilapidated stone steps, said the professor,formed once the magnificent marble staircase that

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GIGANTIC STATUES OF WOMEN UPHOLD THE CORNICE. (105) io6 A TRIP TO THE ORIENT. led to the gateway of the Acropolis. The staircase wasseventy feet in width; in the centre was a slopingcarriageway up which chariots could be driven. It wasbuilt by Pericles four hundred years before the Christianera. Statues of wonderful beauty, by famous sculp-tors, were arranged along the steps. At times of greatrejoicing, as after a victory, triumphal processionsascended these flights to present offerings to the gods,or to deposit in the treasury of the temple the spoilstaken from their enemies and to offer sacrifices andworship to their protecting goddess. The Propylaea,or grand entrance hall and gateway to the Acropolis,stood at the head of the stairway; these broken columnsare all that remain of one of the most imposing structuresof that golden age. Keep close to the professor and never mind theguide, urged one of our companions. We followedher suggestion. This small building on our right with four g

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Image from page 246 of “A trip to the Orient; the story of a Mediterranean cruise” (1907)

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Image from page 246 of “A trip to the Orient; the story of a Mediterranean cruise” (1907)
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Identifier: triptoorientstor00jacorich
Title: A trip to the Orient; the story of a Mediterranean cruise
Year: 1907 (1900s)
Authors: Jacob, Robert Urie
Subjects: Middle East — Description and travel
Publisher: Philadelphia, The J. C. Winston co
Contributing Library: University of California Libraries
Digitizing Sponsor: MSN

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r variouscountries. Beyond the Greek Chapel we descended, by aid ofour burning tapers, a flight of thirty stone steps to theancient, dimly-lit Chapel of St. Helena. When the Empress Helena was inspired to searchfor the true cross, said the guide, she employedworkmen to excavate here. There is the seat on whichshe sat while superintending the search, and there belowus is the excavation in which she found the three crosses,the crown of thorns, the nails, and the inscription. We peered into the darkness below but could see onlya gloomy hole about eight feet deep and twenty feetacross, a short flight of steps cut in the rock, and analtar at one side. CHURCH OF THE HOLY SEPULCHRE. 235 Reascending to the main floor, we halted at theChapel of the Mocking. There the guide showed us thestone upon which the Jews made Jesus sit while theycrowned Him with thorns. The guide then led the wayup a flight of steps to the Chapel of Golgotha, which iswithin the great structure of the church but upon the

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THE OLD STREET OF SORROW LIES BURIED TWENTY FEET BELOW. summit of a rock fifteen feet higher than the main floor.At one side of this chapel, where the rock itself projectsslightly above the floor, a figure of the Christ in dyingagony is suspended upon the cross, and at the foot of thecross stand the figures of Mary, His mother, and St. 236 A TRIP TO THE ORIENT. John, both dejected and sorrowful. These figuresappear to be made of gold and silver. The crownson their heads are covered with diamonds, rubies,emeralds, and other precious stones. A hole in therock surrounded by a gold plate marks the place wherethe original cross stood. On the right and left are theholes where stood the crosses of the thieves. A movablegold plate covers the crevice in the rock caused by theearthquake. In this chapel the pictures on the wallsare encircled with diamonds and other precious stones.Adjoining this room is the Chapel of the Crucifixion,where, as the guide informed us, Christ was nailed to thecross,

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Image from page 236 of “A trip to the Orient; the story of a Mediterranean cruise” (1907)
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Identifier: triptoorientstor00jacorich
Title: A trip to the Orient; the story of a Mediterranean cruise
Year: 1907 (1900s)
Authors: Jacob, Robert Urie
Subjects: Middle East — Description and travel
Publisher: Philadelphia, The J. C. Winston co
Contributing Library: University of California Libraries
Digitizing Sponsor: MSN

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e guide continued his explanations. This edifice, called by the Moslems the Dome of theRock,* said he, but better known as the Mosque ofOmar, is built on the site of the Temple of Herod, andalso on the site of the Temple of Solomon, w^hich pre-ceded that of Herod. Each side of the octagon issixty-six feet in length, and the top of the dome is onehundred and fifteen feet above this platform. Underneath a small pavilion at the entrance, atten-dants laced slippers to our feet and then conducted usinto the Mosque. On the floor lay precious Orientalrugs. Overhead in the dome, the light entered throughrichly stained glass windows, tinting and beautifyingthe interior and disclosing the mosaic decorations of theceiling and the Arabic inscriptions on the walls. At JERUSALEM. 225 one side was an exquisitely carved wooden pulpit inlaidwith ivory and mother-of-pearl. In the centre of theMosque a great rock, at least fifty feet long and almostas wide, rose to the height of our heads. A beautifully

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WE WILL TAKE THE PICTURE AND INCLUDE THE Tl^RKS IN IT. designed, gilded and bronzed iron railing prevented infi-del fingers from touching the rock. This mountain-top, the crown of Mount Moriah,said the Moslem dragoman, as we stood reverently beforeit, is the place where the arm of Abraham was stayedas he lifted the knife to slay his son. This rock, inDavids time, was the threshing floor of Araunah, whose X5

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Image from page 280 of “A trip to the Orient; the story of a Mediterranean cruise” (1907)
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Identifier: triptoorientstor00jacorich
Title: A trip to the Orient; the story of a Mediterranean cruise
Year: 1907 (1900s)
Authors: Jacob, Robert Urie
Subjects: Middle East — Description and travel
Publisher: Philadelphia, The J. C. Winston co
Contributing Library: University of California Libraries
Digitizing Sponsor: MSN

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ds of outstretched, drooping leaves, and byvillages of small mud huts roofed with stalks of sugar-cane, sufficient, we imagined, in that dry country, toprotect the inmates from the burning noonday heat,and to shelter them from the chilling night dews. Oc-casionally the train stopped at large and apparentlyprosperous towns, where there were substantial stonebuildings and busy factories. At these stations Arabvenders offered coffee, lemonade, fruit, and other re-freshments to appease the hunger and thirst of thetravelers. The fields were full of life. Each cultivated acre hadits dark-hued laborers with hoes, or bare-legged toilersdrawing water from the ditches for irrigating thethirsty land, or plowmen guiding teams of ungainly,striding camels or dark gray, crooked-horned oxen.In the lush meadows many of these curious-lookinganimals were grazing. The camels, the small donkeys,and the gray oxen or water-buffaloes as the natives calledthem, tied to stakes, were restricted to the pasturage

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(269) 2 70 .4 TRIP TO THE ORIENT. within reach of their tethers. Along some of the irrigat-ing canals naked dark-skinned men and boys splashedabout in the water, or stood unabashed on the bank ofthe stream, gazing at the passing train. Look at that scene, cried one of the passengers.I wonder whether our cattle at home would not enjoysimilar treatment. In the canal some naked boys were mounted on abuffalo, and near them an Arab, also in the water, wasscrubbing the back of another buffalo, to the evidentenjoyment of that animal. As we approached Cairo, the great valley of the deltanarrowed, and mountain boundaries loomed up in thedistance. Far away to the right the tops of the Pyra-mids, looking very small, silhouetted the sky. On theleft, high hills broke the landscape, and presently thebuildings and minarets that crowned the hills wereoutlined on the horizon. Handsome villas, beautifulgardens, good roads, and increasing traffic in the suburbsindicated the nearness of a prosperous city

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Image from page 296 of “A trip to the Orient; the story of a Mediterranean cruise” (1907)

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Identifier: triptoorientstor00jacorich
Title: A trip to the Orient; the story of a Mediterranean cruise
Year: 1907 (1900s)
Authors: Jacob, Robert Urie
Subjects: Middle East — Description and travel
Publisher: Philadelphia, The J. C. Winston co
Contributing Library: University of California Libraries
Digitizing Sponsor: MSN

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. Almost as suddenly as landing from anemerald sea on to a desert shore, we stepped from arich growth of verdure to a bare slope of yellow sand. CAIRO AND THE PYRAMIDS. 28s At the foot of the Pyramid of Cheops a gesticulating,vociferous throng of Bedouins crowded about us, shout-ing in Arabic mixed with a few intelHgible Enghsh words.Camel-drivers and donkey bo^^s offered the services oftheir animals to makethe circuit; helpers,almost dragging usaway in their eager-ness, insisted that weshould climb to thesummit; and guideswith candles in theirhands importuned usto accompany theminto the gloomy in-terior. After a selec-tion of camels anddonkeys had beenmade by those whodesired to ride, theclamorous crowd ofnatives separated, andwe were allowed tostart accompanied bybut a few, who fol-lowed in case theyshould be needed.Madam might dropher shawl, or want her umbrella carried, or need an armto steady her in the saddle, explained the guide. For scores of centuries, remarked the professor,

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ASTRIDE ITS MOTHER S SHOULDERS. 286 A TRIP TO THE ORIENT. as we stood before the Sphinx, the strong winds fromthe west have carried particles of sand from the desertand deposited them around the Pyramids. Now theoriginal base of Cheops lies twenty or thirty feet be-neath banks of sand and debris that have collectedaround it. In the same manner the encroachingparticles, drifting like the light dry snows of the prairies,have almost engulfed the Sphinx. Many times in thepast the sand has been shoveled away to prevent theSphinx from being hidden from sight, and if this excava-tion in which it now stands should be neglected for atime, the desert winds would fill the pit again andgradually cover the monument. The Granite Templeadjacent to the Sphinx was covered over so completelyin the progress of centuries that its location was for-gotten. It is but fifty years since the French archaeol-ogist Mariette discovered and excavated the interiorof this large structure, the exterior of which, as y

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Image from page 244 of “A trip to the Orient; the story of a Mediterranean cruise” (1907)
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Identifier: triptoorientstor00jacorich
Title: A trip to the Orient; the story of a Mediterranean cruise
Year: 1907 (1900s)
Authors: Jacob, Robert Urie
Subjects: Middle East — Description and travel
Publisher: Philadelphia, The J. C. Winston co
Contributing Library: University of California Libraries
Digitizing Sponsor: MSN

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er leading us to another part of the church.Here the Lord appeared to Mary, His mother, after theResurrection. In a niche beside the high altar is a holein the wall. If you hold your taper up to it you maysee within the wall a part of the column to which theSavior was bound during the Flagellation. You maytouch the sacred column with this round stick, providedfor the purpose, if you wish to do so. The stick, beingworn smooth by the numberless kisses that have beenpressed upon it by the pilgrims after touching the holycolumn, can do it no harm. In a vestibule outside the chapel a star in the marblefloor marks the place where Christ appeared to MaryMagdalene after the Resurrection, and a second stara few feet beyond marks the spot where Mary stoodwhen she recognized the risen Lord. We passed from the rotunda into the Church of theCrusaders or Greek Church, through a wide openingdirectly opposite the door of the Holy Sepulchre. Inthis large chapel the walls and ceilings, the seats of the

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THE VERY STONES HIS SACRED FEET HAVE PRESSED. (233) 234 ^ TRIP TO THE ORIENT. choir, the high altar, and the seat of the Patriarch inthe rear of the altar, are composed of precious woodsbeautifully carved and ornamented with gold and silverand jewels. Hundreds of superb golden and silverlamps, varying in form and design, hang suspendedfrom the ceiling at various heights. In the centre ofthe chapel, standing in the middle of a fancifully designedcircle on the checkered marble floor, is an urn contain-ing a marble ball. This ball marks the centre of the world, explainedthe guide, as we halted beside the urn. About eightcenturies ago certain wise and holy men ascertained,by calculation or by inspiration, that this spot is theexact centre of the world. It was marked in thismanner so that the pilgrims coming here from all partsof the earth might see it and carry the knowledge of thewonderful discovery back with them to their variouscountries. Beyond the Greek Chapel we descended, by aid of

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Identifier: twothousandmiles00edd
Title: Two thousand miles on an automobile; being a desultory narrative of a trip through New England, New York, Canada, and the West
Year: 1902 (1900s)
Authors: Eddy, Arthur Jerome, 1859-1920
Subjects: Eddy, Arthur Jerome, 1859-1920 Automobile travel
Publisher: Philadelphia, London, J.B. Lippincott company

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s; it is as if apprentice blacksmiths hadspent their idle moments in constructing a machine. The carriage work is hopelessly bad. The build-ing of carriages is a long-established industry, em- 6 82 On an Automobile ploying hundreds of thousands of hands and millionsof capital, and yet in the entire United States thereare scarcely a dozen builders of really fine, substantial,and durable vehicles. Yet every cross-road maker ofautomobiles thinks that if he can only get his motorto go, the carpenter next door can do his woodwork.The result is cheap stock springs, clips, irons, bodies,cushions, tops, etc., are bought and put over themotor. The use of aluminum bodies and more metalwork generally is helping things somewhat; not thataluminum and metal work are necessarily better thanwood, but it prevents the unnatural union of the lightwood bodies, designed for cheap horse-vehicles, witha motor. The best French makers do not build theirbodies, but leave that part to skilled carriage builders.

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r-y CHAPTER SEVEN BUFFALO TO CANANDAIGUA The five hundred and sixtv-odd miles to Buffalo had Troubles bcgtn been covered Avith no trouble that delayed us for morethan an hour, but our troubles were about to begin. The Professor had still a few days to waste frivo-lously, so he said he would ride a little farther,possibly as far as Albany. However, it was notour intention to hurry, but rather take it easily,stopping by the way, as the mood—or our friends—seized us. It rained all the afternoon of Tuesday, about allnight, and was raining steadilv when we turned off 83 give out 84 On an Automobile Main Street into Genesee with Batavia thirty-eightmiles straight away. We fuh}- expected to reach therein time for kmcheon; in fact, word had been sentahead that we would come in, like a circus, abouttwelve, and friends were on the lookout,—it was fouroclock when we reached town. The road is good, gravel nearly every rod, but the (steady rain had softened the surface to the depth of about

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Image from page 297 of “Two thousand miles on an automobile; being a desultory narrative of a trip through New England, New York, Canada, and the West” (1902)
philadelphia travel company
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Identifier: twothousandmiles00edd
Title: Two thousand miles on an automobile; being a desultory narrative of a trip through New England, New York, Canada, and the West
Year: 1902 (1900s)
Authors: Eddy, Arthur Jerome, 1859-1920
Subjects: Eddy, Arthur Jerome, 1859-1920 Automobile travel
Publisher: Philadelphia, London, J.B. Lippincott company

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conspiracy to effect suchrevolution, also conspired to excite classes of workingmen inChicago into sedition, tumult, and riot, and to the use ofdeadly weapons and the taking of human life, and for thepurpose of producing such tumult, riot, use of weapons andtaking of life, advised and encouraged such classes by news-paper articles and speeches to murder the authorities of thecity, and a murder of a policeman resulted from such adviceand encouragement, then defendants are responsible there-for. It is the logical application of this proposition thatwill defeat the propaganda of action. If it beenacted that any man who advocates the commissionof any criminal act, or who afterwards condones thecrime, shall be deemed guilty of an offence equal tothat advocated or condoned and punished accordingly,the propaganda of action in all branches of criminalendeavor will be effectually stifled without the doubt-ful expedient of directing legislation against any par-ticular social or economic theory.

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UP THE HLL. CHAPTER SEVENTEEN NEW YORK TO BUFFALO It was Saturday, the 14th, at nine oclock, when weleft New York for Albany, followmg the route ofthe Endurance Contest. The morning was bright and warm. The roadswere perfect for miles. We passed Kings Bridge,Yonkers, Hastings, and Dobbs Ferry flying. At Tar-rytown we dropped the chain. A link had parted.Pushing the machine under the shade of a tree, ahalf-hour was spent in replacing the chain and rivet-ing in a new link. All the pins showed more or lesswear, and a new chain should have been put on inNew York, but none that would fit was to be had.292 New York to Buffalo 293 We dined at Peekskill, and had a machinist go overthe chain, riveting the heads of the pins so nonewould come out again. Nelson Hill, a mile and a half beyond Peekskill, a cUmbproved all it was said to be,—and more. In the course of the trip we had mounted hills thatwere worse, and hills that were steeper, but only inspots or for short distances; for a steady ste

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Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability – coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.

Image from page 193 of “Two thousand miles on an automobile; being a desultory narrative of a trip through New England, New York, Canada, and the West” (1902)
philadelphia travel company
Image by Internet Archive Book Images
Identifier: twothousandmiles00edd
Title: Two thousand miles on an automobile; being a desultory narrative of a trip through New England, New York, Canada, and the West
Year: 1902 (1900s)
Authors: Eddy, Arthur Jerome, 1859-1920
Subjects: Eddy, Arthur Jerome, 1859-1920 Automobile travel
Publisher: Philadelphia, London, J.B. Lippincott company

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s own and use auto-mobiles ; the horses will see so many that little noticewill be taken, but the pioneers of the sport will have animenviable time. A good half-days work was required on the machine So»i/-repairsbefore starting again. The tire that had been plugged with rubber bandsweeks before in Indiana was now leaking, the aircreeping through the fabric and oozing out at severalplaces. The leak was not bad, just about enough torequire pumping every day. The extra tire that had been following along wastaken out of the express office and put on. It was atire that had been punctured and repaired at the fac-tory. It looked all right, but as it turned out the repairwas poorly made, and it would have been better toleave on the old tire, inflating it each day. A small needle-valve was worn so that it leaked;that was replaced. A stiffer spring was inserted in theintake-valve so it would not open quite so easily. Anumber of minor things were done, and every nut andbolt tried and tightened.

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THJE A.^^VaDE INN^ CHAPTER FOURTEEN LEXINGTON AND CONCORD Saturday morning-, September 7, at eleven oclock,we left the Touraine for Auburndalc, where wekmched, then to Waltham, and from there due northby what is known as Waltham Street to Lexington,striking- Massachusetts Avenue just opposite the townhall. PaidRevevf Aloug- this liistoric highway rode Paul Revere; at his heels followed the regulars of King George. Tab-lets, stones, and monuments mark every known pointof interest from East Lexington to Concord.188 Lexington and Concord 189 In Boston, at the head of Hull Street, Christ Church,the oldest church in the city, still stands, and bears atablet claiming for its steeple the credit of the signalsfor Paul Revere: but the Old North Church in NorthSquare, near which Revere lived and where he attendedservice, and from the belfry of which the lanterns werereally hung, disappeared in the conflict it initiated. Inthe winter of the siege of Boston the old meeting-house was pulled down

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Outstanding Scenic Drives on US Route 89 Enhance the Road Trip Experience


Oracle, AZ (Vocus) November 18, 2009

Although most of US Route 89 between Mexico and Canada could be considered as a scenic drive, several sections stand out above the rest. Here is a list of the top five scenic drives selected by the US Route 89 Appreciation Society.

Driving US Route 89, a traveler encounters the greatest variety of scenery available along any one road in the United States, explains James Cowlin, a landscape photographer and founder of the US Route 89 Appreciation Society. From the deserts of Arizona, across the Colorado Plateau in Utah and into the Rocky Mountains of Wyoming and Montana, five of the most outstanding scenic drives are featured in the Road Trip Guides on the US Route 89 website. The Appreciation Society also encourages visitors to the website to add a description and photographs of their favorite scenic drive along highway 89.

Pinal Pioneer Parkway, Arizona

From Oracle Junction north of Tucson to Florence, this 42-mile section of historic US 89 (now AZ 79) is known as the Pinal Pioneer Parkway. Crossing the high Sonoran desert, the road is lined with ancient many-armed saguaro cactus and forests of chain fruit cholla. Black Mountain dominates the view to the east and in the distance are the the Tortilla Mountains. To the south, the peaks of the Santa Catalina Mountains rise to over 9000 feet. While the drive is enjoyable in all seasons, summer temperatures can be quite hot. Be sure to bring plenty of drinking water along. Spring and fall are the best times for this drive when wildflowers and cactuses are in bloom. At the mid-point of the drive is a memorial to the cowboy actor, Tom Mix, who died in a car crash nearby in 1940. Historically, the Pinal Pioneer Parkway was part of the main road linking Phoenix and Tucson, so driving the road today gives the motorist a small taste of what that journey was like before the era of Interstate highways.

Oak Creek Canyon, Arizona

Oak Creek flows south from the edge of the Colorado Plateau through Sedona to the Verde River. The 16-mile stretch of historic US 89A (now AZ 89A) from Sedona to the Oak Creek Vista Overlook takes the traveler through a wonderland of creek-side cottonwood and sycamore trees. Oak Creek has cut down through ancient layers of sandstone and limestone forming red and white cliffs that tower above the road. There are a number of parking areas and campgrounds that give access to the creek for hiking and picnicing. The switchbacks at the head of Oak Creek Canyon mark the transition from the lowland desert and the central mountains of Arizona on to the Colorado Plateau.

Logan Canyon National Scenic Byway, Utah

Logan Canyon is 40-mile stretch of US Route 89 between Logan in the Cache Valley and Garden City on the shore of Bear Lake. From the Wasatch-Cache National Forest boundary east of Logan, the road climbs steadily alongside the Logan River until it reaches the summit at the Bear Lake overlook. The forest-lined drive offers many places to stop for a picnic or to camp for an extended stay. The canyon is also renowned for its display of brightly colored fall foliage. The road is open year-round and recreational opportunities range from hiking and horseback riding to cross-country skiing and snowmobiling. From the summit, US 89 drops quickly to the shore of Bear Lake. A free brochure detailing this scenic drive is available from the Logan Canyon National Scenic Byway website.

Grand Teton National Park, Wyoming

For 45 miles US Route 89 lies inside Grand Teton National Park. Ten overlooks and picnic areas line the highway, providing spectacular views of the jagged eastern face of the Teton Range. Each is a photographers delight, with the Snake River in the foreground in the southern stretch, and Jackson Lake reflecting the mountains in the north. Although the road is open year-round, the most colorful time to drive it is in the fall when the leaves are turning and the air is crisp and clear.

Kings Hill Scenic Byway, Montana

Passing through the Lewis and Clark National Forest, this 71-mile long section of US 89 winds its way along mountain streams through the Little Belt Mountains. Along the road are many outdoor recreation opportunities from fly fishing in the summer to snowmobiling in the winter. One of the highlights is a short hike to Memorial Falls located about a mile and a half south of the town of Neihart. Sluice Boxes State Park is near the northern end of the scenic byway. This primitive state park contains the remains of mines, a railroad and historic cabins lining Belt Creek through a beautiful canyon carved in limestone.

Special Offer for Highway 89 Travelers

Visitors to the US Route 89 website can share their favorites on the Scenic Drives page of the Road Trip Guides. Using the unique Share Your 89 Stories feature, contributors can add a description and photographs to the page. Each person who contributes to this page will receive a free copy of the Adobe Acrobat (pdf} version of the official US Route 89 Road Trip Map Book.

The US Route 89 Appreciation Society is a resource for planning a western road trip vacation and a place for sharing stories and photographs of this unique highway. It is part of the slow road movement that encourages travel on the two-lane roads that lead to the heart and soul of America. For more information, visit the US Route 89 website. Media Contact: James Cowlin, 602-944-3286, jim at us89society dot org.

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Related Society Hill Distance Press Releases

Class trip to New York City for Law and court seeing…suggestions?

Question by waltherkevin: Class trip to New York City for Law and court seeing…suggestions?
Were going on a field to trip NYC for Mock Trial Team. Any suggestions on anything to see?

Best answer:

Answer by Jamerican Steve
Does it have to be legal Based? If so, try the Tweed Courthouse.
Tours are available on weekdays and are offered free of charge. To make a reservation, please call 311 or 212-NEW-YORK outside of New York City.

Here is info on it. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tweed_Courthouse

If not, try the following. with discount passes.
http://411newyork.org/guide/2007/05/23/passes-for-new-york/

American Museum of Natural History
Bodies…The Exhibition
Bronx Museum of the Arts
Bronx Zoo
Brooklyn Botanic Garden
Brooklyn Children’s Museum
Brooklyn Historical Society
Brooklyn Museum
Carnegie Hall Tours
Cathedral of St. John the Divine
Central Park Zoo
Circle Line Sightseeing Cruises
Clipper City–Tall Ship Cruises
Cloisters Museum and Gardens
Empire State Building Observation Deck
Food on Foot Tours
Hispanic Society of America
Historic Richmond Town
Intrepid Sea, Air & Space Museum
Jewish Children’s Museum
Madame Tussaud’s New York
Madison Square Garden All Access Tour
Malcolm X & Dr. Betty Shabazz Memorial, Educational and Cultural Center
Manhattan Mall
Metropolitan Museum of Art
Museum of Modern Art (MoMA)
Museum of the Moving Image
Museum of Sex
Museum of the City of New York
New Museum
NBC Studio Tour
New York Aquarium
New York Botanical Garden
New York City Police Museum
New York Hall of Science
New York Skyride
New York Transit Museum
Noble Maritime Collection
On Location Tours
Paley Center for Media
Prospect Park Zoo
Queens Museum of Art
Queens Zoo
Radio City Music Hall Stage Door Tour
Rock & Roll Hall of Fame ANNEX NYC
Shearwater Sailing
Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum
Staten Island Botanical Garden
Staten Island Children’s Museum
Statue of Liberty and Ellis Island
Immigration Museum Ferry
Studio Museum in Harlem
Top of the Rock
Tour at Lincoln Center
Uncle Sam’s Edgar Allan Poe Greenwich Village Tour
Uncle Sam’s George M. Cohan Theatre District Tour
Uncle Sam’s Hamilton Financial Tour
Van Cortlandt House Museum
Walkin’ Broadway
Wave Hill
Whitney Museum of American Art
Weeksville Heritage Center

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Help planning a trip to Philadelphia?

Question by puppyies123: Help planning a trip to Philadelphia?
My family and I are going on a trip to Philadelphia around Christmas time. What are some suggestions of places to go?
What are some free historical sites to visit, interesting shops, and great places to eat (I’ve been to Gino’s and Pat’s already).
Are there any special things going on around Christmas time?
Thanks!

Best answer:

Answer by Mandy Green
Hi, December in Philly will be very cold, snows a lot too. but around the Christmas time there will be a great many fun. the most famous attractions like historic City Hall, Independence Hall,Society Hill and Liberty Bell will be decorated and lit up for the holidays. if you stand in Love Park in the evening facing the sculpture, you will see a stunning view of lights down JFK Blvd. a small, but still impressive tree is placed in the center section of the water fountain in LOVE Park. most of the historic sites here are free, like Independence Hall, Congress Hall and Old City Hall, The Liberty Bell, Franklin Square – the most family-friendly square in the city, Carpenters’ Hall. if you have only a few days here, i think these are enough for you and your family.

as to shopping, Christmas Village s an outdoor Holiday market event at Dilworth Plaza on the west side of City Hall Philadelphia from Thanksgiving till Christmas Eve. there will be wooden booths and tents selling all kinds of nice stuff, like European food, sweets and drinks as well as international seasonal holiday gifts, ornaments and high quality arts and crafts. the scene will be very impressive

as to hotels, this city offers a great many accommodation options, some of the family friendly ones include: Sheraton Philadelphia City Center Hotel, The Westin Philadelphia, Marriott Philadelphia Downtown. but without knowing your budget and preference, i couldn’t give any specific recommendation. you may find the following link useful:
http://www.philadelphia-hotels-pa.com/hotels

i didn’t know much about dining here, since i am not a gourmet, anything eatable is okay to me. but some of interesting restaurants here include: MidAtlantic Restaurant, Koo Zee Doo, Mixto, and Marrakesh. the food may not be the most yummy(though they are always yummy for me), but you will get the most unique and interesting dining experience. wish you a happy time.

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