Tag Archives: Washington

Image from page 76 of “The Standard guide to Atlantic City, N.J. … contains complete information of interest to travelers regarding Atlantic City, New York, Philadelphia and Washington, D.C. ..” (1909)

Check out these philadelphia travel guide images:

Image from page 76 of “The Standard guide to Atlantic City, N.J. … contains complete information of interest to travelers regarding Atlantic City, New York, Philadelphia and Washington, D.C. ..” (1909)
philadelphia travel guide
Image by Internet Archive Book Images
Identifier: standardguidetoa00atla
Title: The Standard guide to Atlantic City, N.J. … contains complete information of interest to travelers regarding Atlantic City, New York, Philadelphia and Washington, D.C. ..
Year: 1909 (1900s)
Authors:
Subjects: Atlantic City (N.J.) — Guidebooks
Publisher: Atlantic City, N.J., Standard guide publishing co.
Contributing Library: The Library of Congress
Digitizing Sponsor: Sloan Foundation

View Book Page: Book Viewer
About This Book: Catalog Entry
View All Images: All Images From Book

Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book.

Text Appearing Before Image:
CHUTT, Mgr. WINTERFALLandSPRING SUMMER HOTEL RICHMOND I7th and H Streets. N. W. WASHINGTON, D. C. People who travel and stop in Washington, D. C, the most delightful cityin the world, will find accommodations comfortable, elegant and refined at HOTEL RICHMOND Around the corner from the White House 100 ROOMS – 50 BATHS Rates per day, European Plan, .50 and .00 With Bath, .50, .00 and .50 American Plan, .00 and .50 per day With Bath, .00, .50 and .00 Write for Booklet with Map ADIRONDACKS Seven hours from New York without changeLake Luzerne at the Gateway. Switzerland of America WAYSIDE INN and COTTAGES Luzerne Post Office – Warren County, New York 45 minutes from Saratoga Rates: Single, weekly, .50 up ; Double, .00 upRooms with private bath Suites of five rooms and bath Cottages 3 to 12 rooms with bath Write for Booklet CLIFFORD M. LEWIS, Proprietor When writing hotels please mention this Guide. Read inslrudions on pages 11 and 12. 72 THE QUE EN OF ALL RESORTS

Text Appearing After Image:
The New Varnum Hotel New Jersey Avenue and C Street, S. E.WASHINGTON, D. C. Overlooking United States Capitol and Congres-sional Library. Reopened under new management.Sunny Rooms, every one an outside one. PrivateBaths, Suites. Cuisine the very best. American Plan, 82.50 and upKuropean Plan, S1.50 and up Most cheerful and homelike hotel in Washington E. A. BENNETT, Proprietor HOTILL DRISCOLL NEWMODERN WASHINGTON, D. C.

Note About Images
Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability – coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.

Washington DC – National Museum of American History: America on the Move – Steam Locomotive Jupiter

Check out these philadelphia transportation images:

Washington DC – National Museum of American History: America on the Move – Steam Locomotive Jupiter
philadelphia transportation
Image by wallyg
The Steam locomotive, Jupiter, was built in built in August, 1876, by the Baldwin Locomotive Company, Philadelphia, to the order of the Santa Cruz Railroad, in California, for light freight and passenger service in the agricultural region between Santa Cruz and Watsonville. Jupiter was the third locomotive owned by the Santa Cruz Railroad; hence the bronze ‘number plate’ on the engine’s front with the big ‘3.’

When the shortline railroad was bought by a larger railroad company and converted to standard guage (56 1/2 inches between rails) in 1883, Jupiter was sold to the narrow-gauge International Railway of Central America (IRCA), a United Fruit Company subsidiary. Jupiter was used on the IRCA’s remote Ocos Branch rail line, in northwestern Guatemala, hauling mostly bananas, some coffee, and a few passengers until 1960. O. Roy Chalk, who owned D.C. Transit, bought an interest in the successor to the IRCA in the 1960s. For reasons that aren’t clear, Mr. Chalk shipped the battered and derelict Jupiter from Guatemala up to Washington, D.C., for a children’s park he built at 7th & O Streets in the late 1960s. Because of the year in which Jupiter was manufactured – 1876 – Jupiter attracted the attention of curator John H. White, Jr., who persuaded Mr. Chalk to donate the locomotive to the Smithsonian for the Bicentennial Exhibition of 1976, mounted that year in the SI’s Arts & Industries Building.

Smithsonian staff, under White and specialist John N. Stine, restored Jupiter to its present state. The most demanding part of the restoration was perhaps the all-walnut cab, made to furniture-grade standards and constructed using an excellent side-view photograph taken in 1878. A walnut cab had graced Jupiter originally, per the original Baldwin specification. The paintwork and colors also come from the original Baldwin specification.

America on the Move, an ongoing exhibition, fills transportation hall’s nearly 26,000 square feet with 340 objects, and features 19 historic settings in chronological order from the coming of the railroad to a California town in 1876 to the role of the streetcar and the automobile in creating suburbs to the global economy of Los Angeles in 1999.

The National Museum of American History (NMAH), administered by the Smithsonian Institute, collects, preserves and displays American heritage in the areas of social, political, cultural, scientific and military history. The museum, which first opened in 1964 as the Museum of History and Technology, is located on the National Mall in one of the last structures designed by McKim, Mead & White. It was renamed in 1980, and closed for a 2-year, million renovation by Skidmore, Owings & Merrill LLP from 2006 to 2008.

The Smithsonian Institution, an educational and research institute and associated museum complex, administered and funded by the government of the United States and by funds from its endowment, contributions, and profits from its shops and its magazines, was established in 1846. Although concentrated in Washington DC, its collection of over 136 million items is spread through 19 museums, a zoo, and nine research centers from New York to Panama.

30th St. Station
philadelphia transportation
Image by A. Strakey

Washington, D.C., grieves for slain Chapel Hill students

Washington, D.C., grieves for slain Chapel Hill students
Awad said he finds comfort knowing that people in Washington are gathering to remember the three students, over 250 miles away from the Raleigh-Durham-Chapel Hill region known as the Triangle. “People … understand that it's beyond Raleigh, it's …
Read more on McClatchy Washington Bureau

PARKING SPAT BLAMED IN TRAGEDY: 3 slain in Chapel Hill
Craig Stephen Hicks, 46, was charged with three counts of first-degree murder in Tuesday's shooting of Deah Shaddy Barakat, 23, of Chapel Hill; Yusor Mohammad, 21, of Chapel Hill; and Razan Mohammad Abu-Salha, 19, of Raleigh. (AP Photo/Michael …
Read more on Durham Herald Sun

Column: Beer drinking on job a brewery benefit in 1800s
Taprooms grew in popularity becoming elegant rooms with fine furniture and sports pictures on the walls. Some were rooftop affairs with a city view. … Ltd Inc., is on Warsaw Avenue in Price Hill. She is a longtime member of the Price Hill Historical …
Read more on Cincinnati.com

Washington DC for Families – Combine History with Fun in the Nation’s Capitol

The Smithsonian museums are favorites for parents and kids of all ages (and parents love the free admission). The National Air & Space Museum (Independence Ave at 4th Street, SW) features the largest collection of air and spacecraft in the world. Favorite sights include the original Wright 1903 Flyer, the Spirit of St. Louis, the Apollo 11 command module, and a lunar rock sample that visitors can touch. The IMAX theater and planetarium shows rival any blockbuster movie (most shows have a per person admission charge).

The Natural History Museum (10th Street & Constitution Ave. NW) is also a favorite with families. The museum features dinosaur, whale, and shark displays, as well as the legendary Hope Diamond. A new exhibit, Butterflies and Plants: Partners in Evolution will showcase live butterflies and plants in an enclosed pavilion (opening February 2008). The Discovery Room at the Natural History Museum is a hands-on room for families and students. The room features activities using real Museum objects and artifacts. Your kids can feel the skin of a crocodile or try on clothes from another country.

Enjoy learning about other cultures at the National Museum of the American Indian (Fourth Street & Independence Ave., S.W.), exhibiting Native American objects from ancient pre-Columbian civilizations through current times or the Smithsonian Anacostia Community Museum (1901 Fort Place, SE), focusing on African-American culture. The National Zoo (3001 Connecticut Avenue NW) features over 400 different species of animals from all over the world, with the giant pandas one of the most well-known exhibits.

At Arlington National Cemetery, take your kids to the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier (formally the Tomb of the Unknowns) for the changing of the guard which takes place every hour from November to March (every half hour during April-October). It is a definite memory-maker.

For budding artists, Washington DC is a smorgasbord of inspiration. The National Portrait Gallery (Eighth and F Streets, NW ) and the Smithsonian American Art Museum (8th and F Streets N.W.) feature famous portraits and the largest collection of American art in the world. The Smithsonian Hirschhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden (at the corner of Seventh Street SW and Independence Avenue) features modern and contemporary art. The Smithsonian National Museum of African Art (950 Independence Avenue, SW) features contemporary and ancient art from Africa. The Smithsonian Freer Gallery (Jefferson Drive at 12th Street, SW) features a world-renowned collection of art from the East (Japan, Korea, China, South and Southeast Asia) and the Smithsonian Sackler Gallery (1050 Independence Avenue, SW) connected to the Freer, exhibits Chinese, ancient Near Eastern, and Asian art.

No one can resist watching real money being printed on the tour at the Bureau of Engraving and Printing (14th & C Sts., SW).

What kid doesn’t want to be a spy? The International Spy Museum (800 F Street, NW) is the first and only public museum in the USA solely dedicated to espionage and the only one in the world to provide a global perspective on this all-but-invisible profession. It features the largest collection of international spy-related artifacts ever placed on public display.

Everyone has their favorite monument in DC, and the Washington Monument (15th Street, SW) is a favorite of kids, probably because of the view. Take the elevator to the top of the memorial to our nation’s first president, and enjoy the city’s landmarks from a birds-eye view. Just north of the Washington Monument is the Vietnam Veterans Memorial and the Lincoln Memorial.

All of the sightseeing is bound to work up an appetite. Fortunately, Washington has a variety of family-friendly restaurants. ESPN Zone (555 12th St. NW) offers entertainment at the Sports Arena, with a variety of competitive games (and a menu that will please kids and parents). Hard Rock Café (999 E St. NW) is a great place for teens. The Food Court at Union Station (50 Massachusetts Avenue, NE) has more than 30 casual dining choices all in one place plus trains, shops and a movie theater. Fuddruckers (734 7th St NW or 1216 18th St NW) is the home of the make-your-own gourmet burger, plus chicken, soups, and salads. Old Glory BBQ (3139 M Street NW) is a casual Georgetown restaurant with a selection of barbecued ribs, pulled pork and chicken sandwiches, burgers and salads. The retro diner chain, Johnny Rockets (2000 Penn Galleria, 3131 M Street, NW, 1718 Connecticut Ave. NW) offers plenty of kid-friendly food in a fun atmosphere. Thomas Sweet (3214 P St. NW) was voted Best Ice Cream Parlor by locals.

If your family is headed to Washington DC, CRSHotels.com has the perfect hotel for you. Choose the Phoenix Park Hotel the Capitol Hill Suites, the Georgetown Hill Inn or the Best Western Capitol Skyline. Stay at the Lombardy Hotel, the Henley Park Hotel, the Georgetown Suites, the Morrison Clark Historic Hotel, or the Washington Plaza.

Find Your Washington DC Hotel

Article Source:
http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Carlos_Giraldo

Find More History Of Penns View Articles

Statue of Washington outside Independence Hall

Check out these independence hall images:

Statue of Washington outside Independence Hall
independence hall
Image by dolescum
Statue of George Washington outside Independence Hall in Philadelphia, PA, January 2008.

Monument-Colonial America-United States-Independence Hall-714-Knotts Berry Farm-Founding Fathers
independence hall
Image by Edward Headington
Shots of Independence Hall at Knott’s Berry Farm.

Building-Colonial America-United States-Independence Hall-714-Knotts Berry Farm-Founding Fathers
independence hall
Image by Edward Headington
Shots of Independence Hall at Knott’s Berry Farm.

Philadelphia – Old City: Independence Hall – George Washington statue

Check out these independence hall images:

Philadelphia – Old City: Independence Hall – George Washington statue
independence hall
Image by wallyg
Joseph Alexis Bailly’s statue of George Washington was dedicated in front of Independence Hall, on the south side of Chestnut between 5th and 6th Streets, in October 1910. The marble original was erected on the spot in 1908, but moved inside city Hall and replaced by the ,000, 8-foot tall bronze cast copy, founded by Roman Bronze Works, which sits atop a 6’8" marble and granite base.

Independence Hall was built by Edmund Woolley and Andrew Hamilton, the Speaker of the Pennsylvania Assembly, in 1753 as the Pennsylvania State House. But it was the events that took place between 1775 and 1787 that earned it the name Independence Hall, and reinforce its iconic status as the Birthplace of the Nation. It is within its walls that the delegates to the Second Continental Congress met, the Declaration of Independence was approved, and the Constitution of the United States was debated, drafted and signed.

Construction on the redbrick Georgian style building, at the time the most ambitious public work in the colonies, began in 1732. The five-part plan included a 105-foot long main block, two covered arcades, and two 50-foot long wing buildings at the end of the arcades. The Provincial government paid for construction as it went along–piecemeal for 21 years. The building has undergone many restorations, notably by Greek revival architect John Haviland in 1830, and by a committee from the National Park Service, in 1950, returning it to its 1776 appearance. The bell tower, consisting of a wooden steeple set atop the three-story brick house, was the original home of the Liberty Bell and today holds the Centennial Bell, created for the United States Centennial Exposition in 1876.

Independence National Historical Park preserves several sites associated with the American Revolution. Administered by the National Park Service, the 45-acre park was authorized in 1948, and established on July 4, 1956.

Independence Hall was designated a World Heritage Site on October 24, 1979.

Independence National Park Historic District National Register #66000675 (1966)

Philadelphia – Old City: Independence Hall – George Washington statue
independence hall
Image by wallyg
Joseph Alexis Bailly’s statue of George Washington was dedicated in front of Independence Hall, on the south side of Chestnut between 5th and 6th Streets, in October 1910. The marble original was erected on the spot in 1908, but moved inside city Hall and replaced by the ,000, 8-foot tall bronze cast copy, founded by Roman Bronze Works, which sits atop a 6’8" marble and granite base.

Independence Hall was built by Edmund Woolley and Andrew Hamilton, the Speaker of the Pennsylvania Assembly, in 1753 as the Pennsylvania State House. But it was the events that took place between 1775 and 1787 that earned it the name Independence Hall, and reinforce its iconic status as the Birthplace of the Nation. It is within its walls that the delegates to the Second Continental Congress met, the Declaration of Independence was approved, and the Constitution of the United States was debated, drafted and signed.

Construction on the redbrick Georgian style building, at the time the most ambitious public work in the colonies, began in 1732. The five-part plan included a 105-foot long main block, two covered arcades, and two 50-foot long wing buildings at the end of the arcades. The Provincial government paid for construction as it went along–piecemeal for 21 years. The building has undergone many restorations, notably by Greek revival architect John Haviland in 1830, and by a committee from the National Park Service, in 1950, returning it to its 1776 appearance. The bell tower, consisting of a wooden steeple set atop the three-story brick house, was the original home of the Liberty Bell and today holds the Centennial Bell, created for the United States Centennial Exposition in 1876.

Independence National Historical Park preserves several sites associated with the American Revolution. Administered by the National Park Service, the 45-acre park was authorized in 1948, and established on July 4, 1956.

Independence Hall was designated a World Heritage Site on October 24, 1979.

Independence National Park Historic District National Register #66000675 (1966)

Philadelphia – Old City: Independence Hall – George Washington statue
independence hall
Image by wallyg
Joseph Alexis Bailly’s statue of George Washington was dedicated in front of Independence Hall, on the south side of Chestnut between 5th and 6th Streets, in October 1910. The marble original was erected on the spot in 1908, but moved inside city Hall and replaced by the ,000, 8-foot tall bronze cast copy, founded by Roman Bronze Works, which sits atop a 6’8" marble and granite base.

Independence Hall was built by Edmund Woolley and Andrew Hamilton, the Speaker of the Pennsylvania Assembly, in 1753 as the Pennsylvania State House. But it was the events that took place between 1775 and 1787 that earned it the name Independence Hall, and reinforce its iconic status as the Birthplace of the Nation. It is within its walls that the delegates to the Second Continental Congress met, the Declaration of Independence was approved, and the Constitution of the United States was debated, drafted and signed.

Construction on the redbrick Georgian style building, at the time the most ambitious public work in the colonies, began in 1732. The five-part plan included a 105-foot long main block, two covered arcades, and two 50-foot long wing buildings at the end of the arcades. The Provincial government paid for construction as it went along–piecemeal for 21 years. The building has undergone many restorations, notably by Greek revival architect John Haviland in 1830, and by a committee from the National Park Service, in 1950, returning it to its 1776 appearance. The bell tower, consisting of a wooden steeple set atop the three-story brick house, was the original home of the Liberty Bell and today holds the Centennial Bell, created for the United States Centennial Exposition in 1876.

Independence National Historical Park preserves several sites associated with the American Revolution. Administered by the National Park Service, the 45-acre park was authorized in 1948, and established on July 4, 1956.

Independence Hall was designated a World Heritage Site on October 24, 1979.

Independence National Park Historic District National Register #66000675 (1966)

Sightseeing in New York City and Washington DC During a Government Shutdown


Washington, DC (PRWEB) October 02, 2013

OnBoard Sightseeing Tours, the only sightseeing tour company with operations in New York City, Washington DC, and Las Vegas, is operating all tours on a normal schedule despite the government shutdown.

OnBoard’s New York Tours, including the flagship tour, the Premium NY See It All! Tour, have been unaffected by the shutdown. Even with the shutdown, OnBoard Tours give you the best interaction available with the Statue of Liberty, Empire State Building, and all the great attractions people want to experience in New York. Guests get phenomenal photo opportunities at all of the top attractions, including the Statue of Liberty.

In Washington, OnBoard had to adjust some of the tour stops to handle the fact that the monuments are technically closed, but all of the people who took tours today had a fantastic time, thanks to the improvisation and skill of expert tour guides. Given the fact that the monuments are closed, the Smithsonian is closed, and certain roads giving access to the memorials are shut down, the best way to experience Washington DC right now is to take the OnBoard DC It All! Tour, so your tour guide can show you how to enjoy the attractions despite the government shutdown, said Larry Lockhart, Vice President of OnBoard.

The government shutdown is unfortunate, said Tom Schmidt, OnBoards founder, but OnBoards tour guides focus on limiting the impact on our guests. The people who are most affected are those who have not joined a tour with a guide who can navigate the changed landscape. OnBoard tour guides find the best access points and photo opportunities for each monument. They also find alternative itineraries, taking advantage of attractions that are not closed down, like the National Cathedral, U.S. Capitol, Embassy Row, the Air Force Memorial, and other fantastic attractions.

Many of the tours and stops that OnBoard operates have not been affected by the shutdown. The U.S. Capitol, White House, Marine Corps Memorial, and Washington Monument stops are unaffected, as is the yacht cruise on the Potomac River during the DC It All! Tour. Also, OnBoards Mount Vernon and Arlington Cemetery Tour is operating as normal, because those two attractions are open as normal.

Despite the fact that the visitor experience is still very strong on OnBoard Tours, there has been a significant financial impact on OnBoard and other tourism-related companies such as hotels and attractions. OnBoard estimates it will suffer a 20% decline in sales in Washington DC for at least a week, as the result of the shutdown. The problem is that even if the shutdown ends today, many travelers have canceled plans for the next 10 days, and they are not likely to reinstate them. That spells bad news for the tourism industry around national monuments and National Parks. The Statue of Liberty, Liberty Bell, Fort Sumter in Baltimore, Mount Rushmore, and the National Parks such as Yellowstone and Yosemite.

Tom Schmidt, founder of OnBoard Tours, was interviewed on BBC TV on October 1. Here’s a link to one of the OnBoard Tours interviews.







More Liberty Bell Press Releases

Oneida Indian Nation Launches Philadelphia Radio Ad on Sports Icons Growing Opposition to Washington NFL Teams Name

(PRWEB) November 15, 2013

Washingtons NFL team will be faced with a new round of Change the Mascot ads when it heads to Pennsylvania to face the Philadelphia Eagles this Sunday. The radio spot, airing on Philadelphias WIP-FM highlights several historical leaders in the fight for equality in American athletics and thanks the sports icons who have recently spoken out against the Washington teams use of the R-word.

Entitled Legends the radio spot was released today by the Oneida Indian Nation as part of its ongoing Change the Mascot campaign, which will continue to air similar ads throughout the NFL season in Washington and all cities where the team plays road games.

Earlier this week at a White House meeting between President Obama and Native American leaders, Oneida Indian Nation Representative Ray Halbritter personally thanked the president for voicing his concern that the NFL teams nickname was offensive.*

Its heartening to see both world leaders and sports icons taking a stand against the Washington football teams use of a degrading racial epithet, said Halbritter. From the struggles of Jackie Robinson to Billie Jean King, sports have often paved the way to equality in America. We encourage the NFL, Commissioner Roger Goodell, and Washington team owner Dan Snyder to embrace the opportunity to make the change and be remembered for standing on the right side of history.

Full text of Legends ad:

NARRATOR: Whether Jesse Owens, John Carlos, Jackie Robinson, Arthur Ashe or Billie Jean King, sports has always led the fight for equality in America. That tradition is now being carried on in the fight to stop Washington’s pro football team from using a racial slur against Native Americans. From legendary coach Marv Levy to former Raiders president Amy Trask to Washington’s Hall of Fame wide receiver Art Monk to broadcasting legend Bob Costas, leading voices from the sports world are stepping up and saying it is time to end this ugly chapter in NFL history. Even NBA Commissioner David Stern has spoken out against the R-word, saying no professional league should be in the business of promoting such an offensive slur.

RAY HALBRITTER: I’m Ray Halbritter of the Oneida Indian Nation. As a proud sponsor of the NFL, we want to thank these sports icons for speaking out against the NFL’s continued use of a racial slur. In the spirit of mutual respect, it is time for the Washington NFL team to change its name. No group deserves to be treated as a target of racial epithets. We deserve to be treated as what we are: Americans.

*Tribal leaders thank Obama for voicing concern over Washington Redskins name, 11/12/13, washingtonpost.com/national/tribal-leaders-thank-obama-for-voicing-concern-over-washington-redskins-name/2013/11/12/2238f1f6-4bf0-11e3-bf60-c1ca136ae14a_story.html







Things to do in Washington DC, with little money?

Question by catpeople_2000: Things to do in Washington DC, with little money?
I will be staying for a week for a 2 day-course, I know it´s a great city and has a lot of museums, but I dont want to be bored with so much history. Please tell me what can I do in Washington DC -besides museums and historical monuments-, I have a whole week. I am not a party person.

Best answer:

Answer by DC Bob
Eat your way around the world. Washington is a true melting pot with residents from around the world, which is reflected on the menus at area restaurants. Forget the chain restaurants you probably have at home. Instead, make like Columbus and discover the city’s global palette. Local favorites include Mexican tapas at Oyamel, Indian at Rasika, Ethiopian at Etete, Italian at Dino and Belgian at Brasserie Beck.

Pack your running shoes or bicycle. With over 200 miles of trails in Washington, jogging and biking are popular activities. Runners interested in taking in the monuments and looping around the Mall should aim for an early morning jog, as the area gets crowded later in the day. Or head to Rock Creek Park, an 1,800-acre maze of beautiful, well-marked trails, stretching 11 miles from the Lincoln Memorial to beyond the Maryland border. A paved path runs from the Kennedy Center through the park. You can also pick up trails near Dupont Circle and the National Zoo.

Go celebrity spotting. L.A. and New York have movie stars and models. In D.C. the power players are the politicos. Keep your eyes peeled and you might spot a few Washington celebrities. Classic power spots include The Palm and Off the Record, the bar in The Hay-Adams Hotel. For a power breakfast, visit Bistro Bis on the Hill or the Four Seasons in Georgetown. Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi regularly frequents The Source. Senator Harry Reid is a regular at Westend Bistro by Eric Ripert. And former Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice was partial to Bombay Club, near the White House.

Tune into the music scene. Jazz legend Duke Ellington was born and raised in Washington and a thriving musical tradition continues with plenty of hot spots to hear live music, particularly along the U Street corridor where Ellington used to play. Bohemian Caverns hosted everyone from Coltrane to Calloway and the subterranean supper club still features jazz bands. Down the street is The Black Cat, whose founders include Foo Fighter Dave Grohl. Modest Mouse, the White Stripes and Jeff Buckley are just a few of the names who have performed at this hipster club. Across town, in Georgetown there’s Blues Alley, the country’s oldest continuing supper club. Check out the schedule in advance as big name acts sell out quickly.

Put your wallet away. Many of D.C.’s sights are free – the Smithsonian museums, the Washington National Cathedral, National Geographic Society, Library of Congress and so many more. But those aren’t the only freebies to be found. Every day, the Kennedy Center’s Millennium Stage hosts a free performance at 6 p.m. The United States Navy Band performs free concerts throughout the area (check navyband.navy.mil/sched.shtml for the schedule). Tryst Coffeehouse in the lively Adams Morgan neighborhood hosts free jazz nights Monday through Wednesday nights (and free Wi-Fi during the week). Put your bargain hunter hat on and you’ll find there are plenty of free ways to explore the capital.

This is my help from Washington, D.C. United States of America.
Please pick a “Best Answer”, even if it is not mine.
That way we can tell if we really do help people.

Add your own answer in the comments!

Coveted Luxury Three Bedroom Ayer Condominium Now Available in Philadelphias Washington Square Neighborhood


Philadelphia, PA (PRWEB) August 23, 2012

Today, Paul Lipowicz of Keller Williams Realty Center City Philadelphia announced the recent availability and price reduction of a three bedroom with den, three bath condominium at the Ayer, a coveted a 13-story, 56 unit property prominently situated on Washington Square, in the heart of Center City Philadelphia. The condo recently became available after former resident Andre Iguodala, of the Philadelphia 76ers vacated due to a trade to the Denver Nuggets. The list price for unit 6NW has been adjusted to $ 1,349,000.

This former model residence is a part of a high-end residential opportunity offering luxury services and amenities, an inspired art deco design, unparalleled quality of space and light, and spectacular views of tree-lined canopies as well as striking cityscapes. The Ayer is emblematic of the ultimate in luxury urban living with immediate proximity to the heart of Philadelphia, great restaurants, fashionable shopping, abundant history and cultural richness.

The Ayer 6NW represents an extraordinary ownership opportunity and value in the heart of Philadelphia, said Paul Lipowicz, broker with Keller Williams luxury homes. The Ayer stands out as one of Philadelphia’s most coveted and architecturally significant condominium properties and the location, with its proximity to Washington Square, cant be beat with restaurants, shopping and culturally rich activities at your fingertips.

The Ayer was originally built in 1929 as the headquarters of N.W. Ayer & Sons, the first advertising company in the United States. The art deco-inspired building was designed by Philadelphia architect Ralph Bencker, also known for The Rittenhouse Plaza, the Ethical Society building, and the Horn and Hardart chain. The building is built of Indiana Limestone and features bronze doors at the entrance facing Washington Square as well as large Egyptian-style deco sculptures at the top of the building on all four sides. The building became a mixed-use office building in 1972, when N.W. Ayer relocated its headquarters to New York City, and was converted to residences in 2006.

Noted features of 6NW at the Ayer include: 3 bedroom + den, 3 bath layout; imposing loft-like spaces with 11.5 foot ceilings and 8 foot windows; stunning North/West exposures; significant upgrades of the finest exotic materials; Sumatra Rosewood flooring; customized storage throughout as well as Macassar Ebony built-ins; designer lighting, Bulthaup B3 kitchen; Miele/Sub-Zero, natural stone baths; Duravit/Dornbracht bath fixtures; fully automated smart home with motorized shades and custom audio; hotel-style concierge services; on-site valet parking; chauffer-driven sedan; storage locker, pet-friendly building; fitness center; and balance of tax abatement. Pictures of the unit can be found here: http://www.ayercondominium.com

6NW is aggressively priced at $ 1,349,000. For more information and a tour of the unit, please contact Paul Lipowicz, Keller Williams Luxury Homes at (215) 805-9451 or visit http://www.paullipowicz.com.

About Paul Lipowicz:

Since joining Keller Williams Realty-Center City in 2006, Paul Lipowicz has become the go-to broker for many of Philadelphias premier developers and luxury home buyers/sellers. As Keller Williams-Center Citys top individual agent the last three consecutive years, Paul specializes in luxury condominium and single-family sales, both conventional and accelerated, in Center City Philadelphia and the Main Line. A Philly-native, Paul offers boutique, client-centric services and prides himself on always being personally available and intimately acquainted with the most seemingly minute details of realty transactions.

About Keller Williams Realty Inc.:

Founded in 1983, Keller Williams Realty Inc. is the second-largest real estate franchise operation in the United States, with over 700 offices and 84,000 associates in the United States and Canada. The company, which began franchising in 1990, has an agent-centric culture that emphasizes access to leading-edge education and promotes an economic model that rewards associates as stakeholders and partners. For more information, visit Keller Williams Realty Philadelphia – Center City online at http://www.kwphilly.com/

For more information please contact:

Paul Lipowicz

(215) 627-3500 (office)

(215) 805-9451 (mobile)

paul(dot)lipowicz(at)gmail(dot)com







Related History Of Rittenhouse Press Releases