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Image from page 76 of “The Standard guide to Atlantic City, N.J. … contains complete information of interest to travelers regarding Atlantic City, New York, Philadelphia and Washington, D.C. ..” (1909)

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Image from page 76 of “The Standard guide to Atlantic City, N.J. … contains complete information of interest to travelers regarding Atlantic City, New York, Philadelphia and Washington, D.C. ..” (1909)
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Identifier: standardguidetoa00atla
Title: The Standard guide to Atlantic City, N.J. … contains complete information of interest to travelers regarding Atlantic City, New York, Philadelphia and Washington, D.C. ..
Year: 1909 (1900s)
Authors:
Subjects: Atlantic City (N.J.) — Guidebooks
Publisher: Atlantic City, N.J., Standard guide publishing co.
Contributing Library: The Library of Congress
Digitizing Sponsor: Sloan Foundation

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CHUTT, Mgr. WINTERFALLandSPRING SUMMER HOTEL RICHMOND I7th and H Streets. N. W. WASHINGTON, D. C. People who travel and stop in Washington, D. C, the most delightful cityin the world, will find accommodations comfortable, elegant and refined at HOTEL RICHMOND Around the corner from the White House 100 ROOMS – 50 BATHS Rates per day, European Plan, .50 and .00 With Bath, .50, .00 and .50 American Plan, .00 and .50 per day With Bath, .00, .50 and .00 Write for Booklet with Map ADIRONDACKS Seven hours from New York without changeLake Luzerne at the Gateway. Switzerland of America WAYSIDE INN and COTTAGES Luzerne Post Office – Warren County, New York 45 minutes from Saratoga Rates: Single, weekly, .50 up ; Double, .00 upRooms with private bath Suites of five rooms and bath Cottages 3 to 12 rooms with bath Write for Booklet CLIFFORD M. LEWIS, Proprietor When writing hotels please mention this Guide. Read inslrudions on pages 11 and 12. 72 THE QUE EN OF ALL RESORTS

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The New Varnum Hotel New Jersey Avenue and C Street, S. E.WASHINGTON, D. C. Overlooking United States Capitol and Congres-sional Library. Reopened under new management.Sunny Rooms, every one an outside one. PrivateBaths, Suites. Cuisine the very best. American Plan, 82.50 and upKuropean Plan, S1.50 and up Most cheerful and homelike hotel in Washington E. A. BENNETT, Proprietor HOTILL DRISCOLL NEWMODERN WASHINGTON, D. C.

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Coast Guard Band performs with New York Philharmonic

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Coast Guard Band performs with New York Philharmonic
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NEW YORK – Conductor Bramwell Tovey leads the New York Philharmonic Orchestra and Coast Guard Band in a musical piece during the Star-Spangled Celebration held at Lincoln Center’s Avery Hall, July 4, 2013. Based at the Coast Guard Academy in New London, Conn., the Coast Guard Band, a 55-member ensemble performed with the orchestra to celebrate Independence Day.U.S. Coast Guard photo by Petty Officer 2nd Class Erik Swanson.

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Hotels Near Penn Station New York

The Pennsylvania Station, or the Penn Station, as it is commonly known as, is a primary intercity rail hub in the region. It is situated in the underground levels of Pennsylvania Plaza; and is one of the busiest passenger transportation services of the country. Since it is such a major transportation service of the area, therefore a number of people tend to opt for hotels, which are located near the area, in order to avail the facility of easy transport.

If you are about to visit this grand city and have the same preference, then in that case, the following are some of the options that you could choose from:

1. Hotel Pennsylvania

This magnificent hotel is well situated as per your preference. It also offers easy access to the Madison Square Garden, as well as the Empire State Building. The property offers a number of facilities, which include Complimentary fitness center, Refrigerators on request, High-speed Internet access, Air-conditioned public areas, ATM/banking, Audio-visual equipment, Bar/lounge, Beauty services, Business services, Concierge desk, Conference rooms, Currency exchange, Dry cleaning service, Gift shops or newsstand, Medical assistance, Parking garage, Pool table nearby, as well as Tour assistance. However what makes it more attractive, is its close proximity to Penn Station.

2. The Affinia

This magnificent property offers a lot in terms of aesthetics. The crystal chandeliers and the terrazzo floors are an absolute treat to watch. Along with that, the property is also located, as per your preference, giving it the advantage of location as well. The facilities offered by the property include 24-hour front desk, Air-conditioned public areas, ATM/banking, Audio-visual equipment, Ballroom, Bar/lounge, Business center, Business services, Complimentary newspapers in lobby, Concierge desk, Conference room, Currency exchange, Dry cleaning service, wireless Internet access, Laundry facilities, Multilingual staff, Parking garage, Porter/bellhop, Restaurant in hotel, Safe-deposit box, Air conditioning, Blackout drapes/curtains, Cable/satellite TV, Child care, Climate control, Clock radio, Coffee/tea maker, Complimentary newspaper, Cribs, Hair dryer, Hypo-allergenic bedding available, as well as In-room safe.

3. Hampton Inn

Located adjacent to the Madison Square Garden as well as the Herald Square, this property also offers easy access to Jacob K. Javits Convention Center, Macy’s department store, Fifth Avenue shops, Broadway, Times Square, as well as LaGuardia Airport. Here, you are offered wireless Internet access, as well as hot breakfasts. It also offers fitness equipment, business services, limo and Town Car service, a landscaped patio, slate-gray hardwood furnishings, flat-screen plasma TVs, 400-thread count linens, as well as microwave ovens and refrigerators on request. You are also available with a number of other amenities, which can make your stay lavish and grand. However, its close proximity to the Penn station is a factor that should attract you the most.

The above hotels offer a number of facilities, apart from being favorably located, as per your preference. You can therefore always opt for them, when you come to this place.

Looking for Newyork Hotels? Make a reservation at Luxury Hotels in New York

Man found dead after small plane crash off New York coast

Man found dead after small plane crash off New York coast
The two and a half-minute clip debuted on US television during half-time during an American football game between the New York Giants and the Philadelphia Eagles in Philadelphia and was also released online to the delight of fans on social media …
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Washington Redskins vs. New England Patriots: Full Washington Game Preview
Behind a career performance from Kirk Cousins, the team engineered the largest comeback in team history. … At the top, the New York Giants' slipping defense put them on square ground in the loss column with both the Redskins and Philadelphia Eagles.
Read more on Bleacher Report

Image from page 409 of “Roosevelt’s African trip; the story of his life, the voyage from New York to Mombasa, and the route through the heart of Africa, including the big game and other ferocious animals, strange peoples and countries found in the course

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Image from page 409 of “Roosevelt’s African trip; the story of his life, the voyage from New York to Mombasa, and the route through the heart of Africa, including the big game and other ferocious animals, strange peoples and countries found in the course
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Identifier: rooseveltsafrica00ungerfr
Title: Roosevelt’s African trip; the story of his life, the voyage from New York to Mombasa, and the route through the heart of Africa, including the big game and other ferocious animals, strange peoples and countries found in the course of his travels
Year: 1909 (1900s)
Authors: Unger, Frederic William, b. 1875
Subjects: Roosevelt, Theodore, 1858-1919 Game and game-birds
Publisher: [Philadelphia?, PA.]
Contributing Library: Smithsonian Libraries
Digitizing Sponsor: Smithsonian Libraries

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ued by both, but that of the former will be evident from thedescription of the latter. A man without means forms an expedition, and borrows moneyfor this purpose at one hundred per cent, after this fashion. He agreesto repay the lender in ivory at one-half its market value. Having ob-tained the required sum, he hires several vessels and engages from onehundred to three hundred men, composed of Arabs and runaway vil-lains from distant countries, who have found an asylum from justicein the obscurity of Khartoum. He purchases guns and large quantitiesof ammunition for his men, together with a few hundred pounds of 373 374 SAMUEL BAKER AND THE SLAVE TRADE glass beads. The piratical expedition being complete, he pays his menfive months wages in advance, at the rate of forty-five piastres (nineshillings) per month, and he agrees to give them eighty piastres permonth for any period exceeding the five months advanced. His menreceive their advance partly in cash and partly in cotton stuffs for

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BAKERS ARRIVAL AT RIONGAS ISLAND clothes at an exorbitant price. Every man has a strip of paper, uponwhich is written, by the clerk of the expedition, the amount he ha§received both in goods and money, and this paper he must produce atthe final settlement. The vessels sail about December, and on arrival at the desiredlocality, the party disembark and proceed into the interior, until theyarrive at the village of some negro chief, with whom they establish an SIR SAMUEL BASER AND THE SLAVE TRADE 375 intimacy. Charmed with his new friends, the power of whose weap-ons he acknowledges, the negro chief does not neglect the opportunityof seeking their alliance to attack a hostile neighbor. Marchingthroughout the night, guided by their negro hosts, they bivouac withinan hours march of the unsuspecting village doomed to an attack abouthalf an hour before break of day. The time arrives, and, quietly sur-rounding the village while its occupants are still sleeping, they firethe grass huts in all

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Image from page 116 of “A trip to the Orient; the story of a Mediterranean cruise” (1907)
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Identifier: triptoorientstor00jacorich
Title: A trip to the Orient; the story of a Mediterranean cruise
Year: 1907 (1900s)
Authors: Jacob, Robert Urie
Subjects: Middle East — Description and travel
Publisher: Philadelphia, The J. C. Winston co
Contributing Library: University of California Libraries
Digitizing Sponsor: MSN

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iffs on three sides. Theonly approach to its summit, which is about two hundredfeet above the level of the modern city, is on the south-west side, being reached by the avenues we had followedup the gradual slope past Mars Hill. On this height, said the guide, the Athenians,during the reign of Pericles in the golden age of Greece,erected a temple to their patron deity, Minerva, thegoddess of wisdom. And to this goddess, named alsoAthena, who, as they asserted, sprang from the brainof Jupiter a mature woman in complete armor, theylooked for protection. For her they offered theirchoicest gifts, yet they did not neglect the multitude ofother gods whom they feared to offend. The old guide was well informed, but his Englishwas rather difficult to understand. He was inter-rupted a number of times until one of the tourists, acollege professor, undertook the task of assisting himin the story. ■These dilapidated stone steps, said the professor,formed once the magnificent marble staircase that

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GIGANTIC STATUES OF WOMEN UPHOLD THE CORNICE. (105) io6 A TRIP TO THE ORIENT. led to the gateway of the Acropolis. The staircase wasseventy feet in width; in the centre was a slopingcarriageway up which chariots could be driven. It wasbuilt by Pericles four hundred years before the Christianera. Statues of wonderful beauty, by famous sculp-tors, were arranged along the steps. At times of greatrejoicing, as after a victory, triumphal processionsascended these flights to present offerings to the gods,or to deposit in the treasury of the temple the spoilstaken from their enemies and to offer sacrifices andworship to their protecting goddess. The Propylaea,or grand entrance hall and gateway to the Acropolis,stood at the head of the stairway; these broken columnsare all that remain of one of the most imposing structuresof that golden age. Keep close to the professor and never mind theguide, urged one of our companions. We followedher suggestion. This small building on our right with four g

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Image from page 16 of “The New York improvement and tunnel extension of the Pennsylvania railroad. Issued October, 1910” (1910)

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Image from page 16 of “The New York improvement and tunnel extension of the Pennsylvania railroad. Issued October, 1910” (1910)
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Identifier: newyorkimproveme00penn_0
Title: The New York improvement and tunnel extension of the Pennsylvania railroad. Issued October, 1910
Year: 1910 (1910s)
Authors: Pennsylvania Railroad Durst, Seymour B., 1913- former owner. NC
Subjects: Pennsylvania Station (New York, N.Y.) Pennsylvania Railroad Tunnels Tunnels Tunnels
Publisher: Philadelphia, Pa
Contributing Library: Columbia University Libraries
Digitizing Sponsor: The Durst Organization

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rried over72,000,000, in 1896 more than 94,000,000 and in 1906about 140,000,000 people. In 1890 the population gathered within a circle of19 miles radius, with City Hall, Manhattan, as thecenter, was 3,326,998; in 1900 it was 4,612,153, andfive years later it was 5,404,638, an increase in tenyears of 38 per cent. In 1913 it is estimated that thepopulation of this territory will approximate sixmillion people, and in 1920 eight million. These startling figures, and what they meant intransportation needs, in addition to the serious problemof providing corresponding freight facilities, wereconsidered when the Pennsylvania Railroad was con-templating entering New York City. It was evidentthat one of the greatest transportation problems inhistory was rapidly evolving, and it was only by quickaction that the Railroad could prepare to cope with it. With the traffic in and out of New York Citygrowing more rapidly than it had during any periodin the last twenty years, the question confronting 6

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Pen n sylv a ii ia St a tion— Detail of Main Entrance onSeventh Avenue Pennsylvania Station— Detail of Driveway Entrance,Thirty-first Street and SeventhAvenue The Pennsylvania Railroads New York Improvement the Management of the Railroad was whether thevolume of this traffic was such as to warrant anyother method of transportation than ferries for cross-ing North and East Rivers. The action taken bythe Pennsylvania Railroad shows how it met thissituation, and the result is the New York Stationand Tunnel Extension. Ill There were many reasons for the construction ofthis great improvement. The Company desired toprovide for the future by enlarging the present facili-ties for freight and passenger traffic, because of thecontinuous growth in this traffic. To accomplish thisbefore the cost became almost prohibitive, or the taskimpossible because of the construction of other under-ground transportation lines, meant that no time shouldbe lost. It was the Companys plan to run its passenger

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After Hours on 11th Street
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The sky was overcast all day today, and I thought I would go the entire day without getting a decent photo. The dreary weather had me so depressed, I forgot my tripod at home and didn’t even take my camera out of the bag while walking to work this morning.

So after everyone left work, I hung my camera from the ceiling by its neckstrap, pointed it at the 11th Stree/Vine St intersection below, set a 25-second shutter speed, opened the aperture to its widest setting and set ISO to 200. I probably could have taken a better shot if I had brought my tripod and turned out the office lights, but hindsight is always 20-20. Anyway, i like how this turned out. The reflection of my desk gives it an interesting touch.

Image from page 20 of “The New York improvement and tunnel extension of the Pennsylvania railroad. Issued October, 1910” (1910)

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Image from page 20 of “The New York improvement and tunnel extension of the Pennsylvania railroad. Issued October, 1910” (1910)
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Identifier: newyorkimproveme00penn
Title: The New York improvement and tunnel extension of the Pennsylvania railroad. Issued October, 1910
Year: 1910 (1910s)
Authors: Pennsylvania Railroad Durst, Seymour B., 1913- former owner. NC
Subjects: Pennsylvania Station (New York, N.Y.) Pennsylvania Railroad Tunnels Tunnels Tunnels
Publisher: Philadelphia, Pa
Contributing Library: Columbia University Libraries
Digitizing Sponsor: The Durst Organization

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th similar connections inthese Boroughs, with freight stations suitably locatedto develop their commercial interests. It was planned to provide additional freightfacilities, and, by the use of the Long Island Railroad,to shorten the water transportation trip for the NewEngland traffic across New York Harbor from twelveto three and four-tenths miles. The Company considered it its duty to obtain aproper share of the golden future by judicious ex-penditures in a territory having abundant promise,whether viewed from the growth of traffic in the past,or the outlook for the future. IV Built after the Roman Doric style of architecture,the New York Station of the Pennsylvania Railroadcovers the entire area bounded by Seventh and EighthAvenues and Thirty-first and Thirty-third Streets.The depth of the property on both streets is 799 feet11 % inches, and the length of the building is 788 feet9 inches, thus allowing for extra-wide sidewalks onboth side streets and avenues. The walls extend 430 8

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Pennsylvania Station— Seventh Avenue Facade lookingNorth from Thirty-first Street Ivania Station—Detail of Thirty-third StreetEntrance to Main WaitingRoom The Pennsylvania Railroads New York Improvement feet 6 inches from Thirty-first Street to Thirty-thirdStreet, the Seventh Avenue facade signalizing themain entrance. While the facades of the station were designed tosuggest the imposing character of the ancient Romantemples and baths, the impression intended to bemade upon the layman approaching the Station, infull view of the exterior of the general waiting roomwith its huge semi-circular windows, is that of one ofthe leading railway stations of the world. In designing the exterior of the building, Messrs.McKim, Mead & White, the architects, were at painsto embody two ideas : To express in so far as was prac-ticable, with the unusual condition of tracks below thestreet surface and in spite of the absence of the con-ventional train shed, not only the exterior design of agreat

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Image from page 151 of “Progressive Pennsylvania; a record of the remarkable industrial development of the Keystone state, with some account of its early and its later transportation systems, its early settlers, and its prominent men” (1908)
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Identifier: progressivepenns00swan
Title: Progressive Pennsylvania; a record of the remarkable industrial development of the Keystone state, with some account of its early and its later transportation systems, its early settlers, and its prominent men
Year: 1908 (1900s)
Authors: Swank, James Moore, 1832-1914
Subjects:
Publisher: Philadelphia, J.B. Lippincott Co.
Contributing Library: Smithsonian Libraries
Digitizing Sponsor: Smithsonian Libraries

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the dif-ferent parts of Pennsylvania its citizens could not affordto yield to New York the trade of the Great West throughits Erie Canal without making an effort to secure a partof this trade. Leading citizens had long urged the neces-sity of more convenient means of communication betweenthe Delaware and the western parts of the State than wereafforded by roads and turnpikes. The project of unitingthe Delaware with Lake Erie by a system of canals andriver navigation was considered by the General Assemblyas early as 1769, and was embodied in 1811 in the char-ter of the Union Canal Company already mentioned. Oth-er early projects contemplated the opening of communi-cation by water as far as possible between the Delawareand the Ohio at Pittsburgh. But none of these schemesassumed tangible form until about the time of the com-pletion of the Erie Canal in 1825. Even if practicable inall cases they could not have been realized by individualeffort; the State would have had to undertake them.

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THE BUILDING OF THE PENNSYLVANIA CANAL. 139 CHAPTER XIV. THE BUILDING OF THE PENNSYLVANIA CANAL. On February 10, 1824, a committee of the Pennsylva-nia Legislature, to which had been referred the subject ofimproving the transportation facilities between the easternand western parts of the State, recommended that a sur-vey be made of a route along the valleys of the Susque-hanna, Juniata, Conemaugh, Kiskiminitas, and Alleghenyrivers, with a view to a continuous canal from Philadel-phia to Pittsburgh. On March 27,1824, an act was passedauthorizing three commissioners to explore a route for acanal from Harrisburg to Pittsburgh by the waters of theJuniata and Conemaugh rivers, and by the west branch ofthe Susquehanna and Sinnemahoning with the waters ofthe Allegheny, and also a route from a point on the Schuyl-kill river in the county of Schuylkill, thence by Mahanoycreek, the river Susquehanna, the Moshannon or Clearfieldand Blacklick creeks, the Conemaugh, the Kiskiminitas,and Allegheny

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Image from page 12 of “Progressive Pennsylvania; a record of the remarkable industrial development of the Keystone state, with some account of its early and its later transportation systems, its early settlers, and its prominent men” (1908)
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Identifier: progressivepenns00swan
Title: Progressive Pennsylvania; a record of the remarkable industrial development of the Keystone state, with some account of its early and its later transportation systems, its early settlers, and its prominent men
Year: 1908 (1900s)
Authors: Swank, James Moore, 1832-1914
Subjects:
Publisher: Philadelphia, J.B. Lippincott Co.
Contributing Library: Smithsonian Libraries
Digitizing Sponsor: Smithsonian Libraries

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tation in Pennsylvania 102 11. Early Navigation in Pennsylvania … 114 12. Early Steamboats in Pennsylvania 124 13. Early Canals in Pennsylvania 130 14. The Building of the Pennsylvania Canal 139 15. The Pennsylvania Canal in Operation . 149 16. Early Railroads in the United States 156 17. Early Railroads in Pennsylvania 165 18. The Great Industries of Pennsylvania 174 19. The Early Iron Industry of Pennsylvania .. 185 20. The Manufacture of Iron and Steel Rails 202 21. Cornwall and Other Iron Ores 216 22. Coal and Coke in Pennsylvania 224 23. Industries Developed by Pennsylvanians 229. 24. Industries Created by Pennsylvanians 240 25. Early Chain and Wire Bridges 248 26. The Early History of Pittsburgh 255 27. Chronological Record of Important Events 267 28. The Muhlenberg Family of Pennsylvania 289 29. General Arthur St. Clair 298 30. Albert Gallatin 312 31. A Man of Letters 316 32. Two Men from Somerset 331 33. A Champion of Protection 342 34. Other Noted Western Pennsylvanians 349

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B&M* PROGRESSIVE PENNSYLVANIA. CHAPTER I. THE LACK OF CIVIC PRIDE IN PENNSYLVANIA. Pkominent Pennsylvanians have repeatedly and forci-bly called attention to the lack of civic pride in Pennsyl-vania, and they have had good reason for their criticism.It has been truthfully said that we even neglect to claimfor our military heroes the honors that are their due. Thewinter at Valley Forge, which marked the supreme crisisof the Revolution, and the battle of Gettysburg, which de-termined the fate of the Southern Confederacy, are eventsin the history of Pennsylvania to which its people mightpoint with greater pride than they do. The achievementsof eminent Pennsylvanians in war and in peace are nottaught to the children of the State in their school-booksor commemorated to any considerable extent in monu-ments, or statues, or bronze tablets, so that the presentgeneration of Pennsylvanians and succeeding generationsmay be reminded of the deeds of these great men andbe inspired to noble deedprogressivepenns00swan

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Killer of two New York City police officers had long criminal history

Killer of two New York City police officers had long criminal history
Moments before opening fire, Ismaaiyl Brinsley approached people on the street and asked them to follow him on Instagram, then told them, “Watch what I'm going to do,” Chief of Detectives Robert Boyce said. A portrait of the Brooklyn-born gunman …
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Targeted by their uniform: The disturbing 43-year history of assassinations of
On May 21, 1971, Patrolmen Waverly Jones and Joseph Piagentini were ambushed from behind on a street in Harlem, during the early days of violent actions by the Black Liberation Army—which sought to create a separate country for Americans of African …
Read more on New York’s PIX11 / WPIX-TV

Image from page 88 of “Two thousand miles on an automobile; being a desultory narrative of a trip through New England, New York, Canada, and the West” (1902)

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Image from page 88 of “Two thousand miles on an automobile; being a desultory narrative of a trip through New England, New York, Canada, and the West” (1902)
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Identifier: twothousandmiles00edd
Title: Two thousand miles on an automobile; being a desultory narrative of a trip through New England, New York, Canada, and the West
Year: 1902 (1900s)
Authors: Eddy, Arthur Jerome, 1859-1920
Subjects: Eddy, Arthur Jerome, 1859-1920 Automobile travel
Publisher: Philadelphia, London, J.B. Lippincott company

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s; it is as if apprentice blacksmiths hadspent their idle moments in constructing a machine. The carriage work is hopelessly bad. The build-ing of carriages is a long-established industry, em- 6 82 On an Automobile ploying hundreds of thousands of hands and millionsof capital, and yet in the entire United States thereare scarcely a dozen builders of really fine, substantial,and durable vehicles. Yet every cross-road maker ofautomobiles thinks that if he can only get his motorto go, the carpenter next door can do his woodwork.The result is cheap stock springs, clips, irons, bodies,cushions, tops, etc., are bought and put over themotor. The use of aluminum bodies and more metalwork generally is helping things somewhat; not thataluminum and metal work are necessarily better thanwood, but it prevents the unnatural union of the lightwood bodies, designed for cheap horse-vehicles, witha motor. The best French makers do not build theirbodies, but leave that part to skilled carriage builders.

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r-y CHAPTER SEVEN BUFFALO TO CANANDAIGUA The five hundred and sixtv-odd miles to Buffalo had Troubles bcgtn been covered Avith no trouble that delayed us for morethan an hour, but our troubles were about to begin. The Professor had still a few days to waste frivo-lously, so he said he would ride a little farther,possibly as far as Albany. However, it was notour intention to hurry, but rather take it easily,stopping by the way, as the mood—or our friends—seized us. It rained all the afternoon of Tuesday, about allnight, and was raining steadilv when we turned off 83 give out 84 On an Automobile Main Street into Genesee with Batavia thirty-eightmiles straight away. We fuh}- expected to reach therein time for kmcheon; in fact, word had been sentahead that we would come in, like a circus, abouttwelve, and friends were on the lookout,—it was fouroclock when we reached town. The road is good, gravel nearly every rod, but the (steady rain had softened the surface to the depth of about

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Image from page 297 of “Two thousand miles on an automobile; being a desultory narrative of a trip through New England, New York, Canada, and the West” (1902)
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Identifier: twothousandmiles00edd
Title: Two thousand miles on an automobile; being a desultory narrative of a trip through New England, New York, Canada, and the West
Year: 1902 (1900s)
Authors: Eddy, Arthur Jerome, 1859-1920
Subjects: Eddy, Arthur Jerome, 1859-1920 Automobile travel
Publisher: Philadelphia, London, J.B. Lippincott company

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conspiracy to effect suchrevolution, also conspired to excite classes of workingmen inChicago into sedition, tumult, and riot, and to the use ofdeadly weapons and the taking of human life, and for thepurpose of producing such tumult, riot, use of weapons andtaking of life, advised and encouraged such classes by news-paper articles and speeches to murder the authorities of thecity, and a murder of a policeman resulted from such adviceand encouragement, then defendants are responsible there-for. It is the logical application of this proposition thatwill defeat the propaganda of action. If it beenacted that any man who advocates the commissionof any criminal act, or who afterwards condones thecrime, shall be deemed guilty of an offence equal tothat advocated or condoned and punished accordingly,the propaganda of action in all branches of criminalendeavor will be effectually stifled without the doubt-ful expedient of directing legislation against any par-ticular social or economic theory.

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UP THE HLL. CHAPTER SEVENTEEN NEW YORK TO BUFFALO It was Saturday, the 14th, at nine oclock, when weleft New York for Albany, followmg the route ofthe Endurance Contest. The morning was bright and warm. The roadswere perfect for miles. We passed Kings Bridge,Yonkers, Hastings, and Dobbs Ferry flying. At Tar-rytown we dropped the chain. A link had parted.Pushing the machine under the shade of a tree, ahalf-hour was spent in replacing the chain and rivet-ing in a new link. All the pins showed more or lesswear, and a new chain should have been put on inNew York, but none that would fit was to be had.292 New York to Buffalo 293 We dined at Peekskill, and had a machinist go overthe chain, riveting the heads of the pins so nonewould come out again. Nelson Hill, a mile and a half beyond Peekskill, a cUmbproved all it was said to be,—and more. In the course of the trip we had mounted hills thatwere worse, and hills that were steeper, but only inspots or for short distances; for a steady ste

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Image from page 193 of “Two thousand miles on an automobile; being a desultory narrative of a trip through New England, New York, Canada, and the West” (1902)
philadelphia travel company
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Identifier: twothousandmiles00edd
Title: Two thousand miles on an automobile; being a desultory narrative of a trip through New England, New York, Canada, and the West
Year: 1902 (1900s)
Authors: Eddy, Arthur Jerome, 1859-1920
Subjects: Eddy, Arthur Jerome, 1859-1920 Automobile travel
Publisher: Philadelphia, London, J.B. Lippincott company

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s own and use auto-mobiles ; the horses will see so many that little noticewill be taken, but the pioneers of the sport will have animenviable time. A good half-days work was required on the machine So»i/-repairsbefore starting again. The tire that had been plugged with rubber bandsweeks before in Indiana was now leaking, the aircreeping through the fabric and oozing out at severalplaces. The leak was not bad, just about enough torequire pumping every day. The extra tire that had been following along wastaken out of the express office and put on. It was atire that had been punctured and repaired at the fac-tory. It looked all right, but as it turned out the repairwas poorly made, and it would have been better toleave on the old tire, inflating it each day. A small needle-valve was worn so that it leaked;that was replaced. A stiffer spring was inserted in theintake-valve so it would not open quite so easily. Anumber of minor things were done, and every nut andbolt tried and tightened.

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THJE A.^^VaDE INN^ CHAPTER FOURTEEN LEXINGTON AND CONCORD Saturday morning-, September 7, at eleven oclock,we left the Touraine for Auburndalc, where wekmched, then to Waltham, and from there due northby what is known as Waltham Street to Lexington,striking- Massachusetts Avenue just opposite the townhall. PaidRevevf Aloug- this liistoric highway rode Paul Revere; at his heels followed the regulars of King George. Tab-lets, stones, and monuments mark every known pointof interest from East Lexington to Concord.188 Lexington and Concord 189 In Boston, at the head of Hull Street, Christ Church,the oldest church in the city, still stands, and bears atablet claiming for its steeple the credit of the signalsfor Paul Revere: but the Old North Church in NorthSquare, near which Revere lived and where he attendedservice, and from the belfry of which the lanterns werereally hung, disappeared in the conflict it initiated. Inthe winter of the siege of Boston the old meeting-house was pulled down

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